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dc.contributor.authorTakhar, Sukhraj
dc.contributor.authorLiyanage, Kapila
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-21T13:56:36Z
dc.date.available2017-06-21T13:56:36Z
dc.date.issued2017-07-25
dc.identifier.citationTakhar, S. and Liyanage, K. (2017) 'Top down or bottom up? – Supply chain engagement for material compliance reporting', Proceedings of the International Symposium on Industrial Engineering and Operations Management (IEOM) Bristol, UK, July 24-25en
dc.identifier.isbn9781509039241
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621655
dc.description.abstractMaterial compliance reporting relates to engaging with a supply chain to ascertain the materials (substances and mixtures) applied as part of a transformation cycle for a given product (termed ‘article’ in chemical regulations). Chemical regulations result in increasing control over chemical substance usage. The material compliance reporting information is required to ensure compliance to the chemical regulations, by identifying the chemical substances and mixtures used within an article, which can then be compared against regulated chemical substance lists to identify potential business risks. This paper contributes to material compliance reporting literature by identifying a research gap, relating to supply chain approaches to material compliance. The results will aid other industries when examining best practice implementation approaches.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIEEEen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ieomsociety.org/ieomuk/en
dc.subjectMaterial compliance reportingen
dc.subjectSupply chain engagementen
dc.subjectMaterial declarationen
dc.subjectTransformation cycleen
dc.subjectChemical regulationsen
dc.titleTop down or bottom up? – Supply chain engagement for material compliance reportingen
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
html.description.abstractMaterial compliance reporting relates to engaging with a supply chain to ascertain the materials (substances and mixtures) applied as part of a transformation cycle for a given product (termed ‘article’ in chemical regulations). Chemical regulations result in increasing control over chemical substance usage. The material compliance reporting information is required to ensure compliance to the chemical regulations, by identifying the chemical substances and mixtures used within an article, which can then be compared against regulated chemical substance lists to identify potential business risks. This paper contributes to material compliance reporting literature by identifying a research gap, relating to supply chain approaches to material compliance. The results will aid other industries when examining best practice implementation approaches.


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