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dc.contributor.authorHall, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-10T14:56:13Z
dc.date.available2017-05-10T14:56:13Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-19
dc.identifier.citationHall, M. (2017) 'Disability, discourse and desire: Analyzing online talk by people with disabilities', Sexualities, DOI: 10.1177/1363460716688675en
dc.identifier.issn13634607
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1363460716688675
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621603
dc.description.abstractFran Vicary, who has had cerebral palsy from birth, recently claimed in the UK newspaper, The Guardian, that most people with a disability seek to express themselves sexually. Arguing from personal experience, she said the expression of sexual desire is a much contested space for those with disabilities because their sexualities and bodies are controlled by broader public discourses that delegitimize and stigmatize their sexual agency and the possibility of pleasure. It is not surprising then that positive and empowering discourses of disability and sexuality are either invisible or missing. Drawing on discourse analysis, the author examines electronic talk by people with disabilities in a disability specific online community website. His analysis shows their rejection of mainstream discourses positioning them as asexual and the deployment of mainstream discourses, which draw on gender, sexuality and intimacy, as well as the circulation of disability-specific sexual pleasure discourses with sex workers and caregivers. The use of social media in expressing marginalized sexual identities is also discussed.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSageen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1363460716688675en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Sexualitiesen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectDisabilityen
dc.subjectDiscourse analysisen
dc.subjectSexual desiresen
dc.subjectSocial mediaen
dc.subjectSexual preferencesen
dc.titleDisability, discourse and desire: Analyzing online talk by people with disabilitiesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn14617382
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalSexualitiesen
html.description.abstractFran Vicary, who has had cerebral palsy from birth, recently claimed in the UK newspaper, The Guardian, that most people with a disability seek to express themselves sexually. Arguing from personal experience, she said the expression of sexual desire is a much contested space for those with disabilities because their sexualities and bodies are controlled by broader public discourses that delegitimize and stigmatize their sexual agency and the possibility of pleasure. It is not surprising then that positive and empowering discourses of disability and sexuality are either invisible or missing. Drawing on discourse analysis, the author examines electronic talk by people with disabilities in a disability specific online community website. His analysis shows their rejection of mainstream discourses positioning them as asexual and the deployment of mainstream discourses, which draw on gender, sexuality and intimacy, as well as the circulation of disability-specific sexual pleasure discourses with sex workers and caregivers. The use of social media in expressing marginalized sexual identities is also discussed.


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