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dc.contributor.authorO'Driscoll, Brian
dc.contributor.authorClay, Patricia L.
dc.contributor.authorCawthorn, R. Grant
dc.contributor.authorLenaz, Davide
dc.contributor.authorAdetunji, Jacob
dc.contributor.authorKronz, Andreas
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-02T15:22:47Z
dc.date.available2017-05-02T15:22:47Z
dc.date.issued2014-02-01
dc.identifier.citationO'Driscoll, B. et al (2014) 'Trevorite: Ni-rich spinel formed by metasomatism and desulfurization processes at Bon Accord, South Africa?', Mineralogical Magazine, 78 (1):145.en
dc.identifier.issn0026461X
dc.identifier.issn14718022
dc.identifier.doi10.1180/minmag.2014.078.1.11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621579
dc.description.abstractThe 3.5 Ga Bon Accord Ni deposit occurs within the lowest serpentinized mafic ultramafic lavas of the Barberton Greenstone Belt (South Africa). Though now completely mined out, it comprised a suite of rare Ni-rich minerals that led to its interpretation as either an extraterrestrial body or as an oxidized fragment of Fe-Ni alloy originating from the terrestrial core. In this study, we draw on detailed petrographic observation and mineral chemical data, as well as previous work, to re-evaluate these ideas. The balance of evidence, from thin section (<1 mm) to regional (∼10s of km) scales, appears to support an alternative origin for Bon Accord, possibly as an oxidized Ni-sulfide deposit formed in association with ocean floor komatiite eruptions.
dc.description.sponsorshipNAen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMineralogical Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://openurl.ingenta.com/content/xref?genre=article&issn=0026-461X&volume=78&issue=1&spage=145en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Mineralogical Magazineen
dc.subjectBon accorden
dc.subjectDesulfursizationen
dc.subjectMetasomatismen
dc.subjectSouth Africaen
dc.subjectSpinelen
dc.subjectTrevoriteen
dc.titleTrevorite: Ni-rich spinel formed by metasomatism and desulfurization processes at Bon Accord, South Africa?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentKeele Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Manchesteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of the Witwatersranden
dc.contributor.departmentTrieste Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Göttingenen
dc.identifier.journalMineralogical Magazineen
html.description.abstractThe 3.5 Ga Bon Accord Ni deposit occurs within the lowest serpentinized mafic ultramafic lavas of the Barberton Greenstone Belt (South Africa). Though now completely mined out, it comprised a suite of rare Ni-rich minerals that led to its interpretation as either an extraterrestrial body or as an oxidized fragment of Fe-Ni alloy originating from the terrestrial core. In this study, we draw on detailed petrographic observation and mineral chemical data, as well as previous work, to re-evaluate these ideas. The balance of evidence, from thin section (<1 mm) to regional (∼10s of km) scales, appears to support an alternative origin for Bon Accord, possibly as an oxidized Ni-sulfide deposit formed in association with ocean floor komatiite eruptions.


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