• Coalescing the lean and circular economy

      Nadeem, S.P.; University of Derby (IEOM Society, 2019-03)
      Growing population along with technological advancement to pace the production speed like never before has raised alarming concerns and attracted attention globally. Circular Economy, a fairly new concept has emerged to address such issues by proposing closed loop system in contrast to linear system. While the concept of Circular Economy presents a great potential, there yet remain the challenge for its adaptation in the existing manufacturing sector, especially at SMEs level. Many new techniques, methods and models are being developed, many of which require a complete change in the existing system, which not only have capital requirements but also upskilling labour. For SMEs it is challenging to have such transition due to higher capital and skills requirements. This research explores the possibility to combine the existing concept of Lean with Circular Economy for speedy and easy adaptation of Circular Economy principles within manufacturing sector, especially at SMEs level. A novel conceptually developed framework is proposed to merge the vitality of Lean and Circular Economy.
    • Impact of lean, agile and green (LAG) on business competitiveness: An empirical study of fast moving consumer goods businesses

      Udokporo, C.K.; Anosike, A.I.; Lim, M.K.; Nadeem, S.P.; Garza-Reyes, J.A.; Ogbuka, C.P.; University of Derby; Coventry University; Eneyserv Ltd, Nottingham (Elsevier, 2020-02-08)
      The adoption/utilisation of Lean, Agile and Green (LAG) practices in both the manufacturing and service sector is rising. However, there yet remain a research gap to precisely evaluate the relationship between LAG practices and business competitiveness (e.g, achieving reduction in cost, lead time and environmental recyclable waste). This research aims to explore this relationship, specifically in fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) businesses. The hypothesised relationships are tested with data collected from 96 FMCG companies. Structural Equation Modelling is applied to evaluate different channels of achieving business competitiveness through the adoption of Lean, Agile and Green. The findings suggest that competitive outcomes vary with the adoption of LAG practices in specific product life cycle stages. This implies that awareness of the product life cycle concept is essential. A combination of LAG practices for the sole purpose of reducing environmental waste is negatively related to environmental waste reduction. LAG practices are more efficiently adopted when the adopters are equipped with expert knowledge on the paradigms and their individual practices. This research has approached the attainment of competitiveness in the FMCG businesses by analysing management efforts that improve cost performance, lead time and environmental sustainability aspects of business operations. The research has also considered the product life cycle stages in analysing the impacts of management efforts.
    • Measuring operational excellence: an operational excellence profitability (OEP) approach.

      Gólcher-Barguil, L.A.; Nadeem, S.P.; Garza-Reyes, J.A.; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2019-03-08)
      The pursuit of operational excellence in the manufacturing industry is at rise, but its measurement still lacks of appropriate indicators to determine its financial benefits. The ambiguity is due to the impact arisen from manufacturing fluctuations such as price and cost, production mix, and direct and indirect parameters variations. Manufacturing fluctuations distort the cost benefit of operational excellence. This paper therefore proposes the OEP (Operational Excellence Profitability) indicators to isolate the impact of manufacturing fluctuation, and distinctly identify the payback of operational excellence strategies and initiatives through cost benefits of achieving higher efficiency and yield. The paper presents the conceptual and mathematical development of the proposed OEP indicators and the formulas used for their calculation. Hypothetical and industrial-based investigations and applications of the OEP indicators are conducted for their validation. The results obtained from the hypothetical exercise and industrial case suggest that OEP indicators can provide an effective cost benefit analysis of operational excellence. This would contribute in providing manufacturing organisations with more complete information regarding the performance of their processes, which will allow their directors and managers to take better decisions related to the management and improvement of their processes.