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dc.contributor.authorEsmond, Bill
dc.contributor.authorWood, Hayley
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-27T09:46:47Z
dc.date.available2017-03-27T09:46:47Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-27
dc.identifier.citationEsmond, B. and Wood, H. (2017) 'More morphostasis than morphogenesis? The ‘dual professionalism’ of English Further Education workshop tutors', Journal of Vocational Education & Training, DOI: 10.1080/13636820.2017.1309568.en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13636820.2017.1309568
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621521
dc.description.abstractAn international repositioning of vocational teachers in relation to knowledge and the workplace is reflected in English Further Education through the terminology of ‘dual professionalism’. Particularly in settings most closely linked to specific occupations, this discourse privileges occupational expertise that vocational educators bring from their former employment alongside pedagogic expectations of the teaching role. In a qualitative study of recently qualified teachers employed substantially in workshop settings, using the analytical framework of Margaret Archer, workplace skills and generic attributes provided a basis for claims to expertise, extending to a custodianship of former occupations. Further augmentation of educator roles, however, appeared constrained by market approaches to development and employment insecurity in the sector and beyond. In Archer’s terms, the current environment appears to cast ‘dual professionalism’ as morphostasis, drawing on former practice at the expense of teacher identity in the face of insecurity. Morphogenesis into enhanced professional teacher identities, for example, developing coherent vocational pedagogies informed by research into advances in knowledge, appears the less likely outcome in the current and emerging sector.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/13636820.2017.1309568?needAccess=trueen
dc.subjectDual professionalismen
dc.subjectVocational educatorsen
dc.subjectTeacher educationen
dc.subjectWorkbased learningen
dc.subjectVocational pedagogyen
dc.subjectCritical realismen
dc.titleMore morphostasis than morphogenesis? The ‘dual professionalism’ of English Further Education workshop tutorsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Vocational Education & Trainingen
dc.relation.embedded<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ETJ8WfgcYNA?rel=0&amp;controls=0" frameborder="0" gesture="media" allow="encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-27T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractAn international repositioning of vocational teachers in relation to knowledge and the workplace is reflected in English Further Education through the terminology of ‘dual professionalism’. Particularly in settings most closely linked to specific occupations, this discourse privileges occupational expertise that vocational educators bring from their former employment alongside pedagogic expectations of the teaching role. In a qualitative study of recently qualified teachers employed substantially in workshop settings, using the analytical framework of Margaret Archer, workplace skills and generic attributes provided a basis for claims to expertise, extending to a custodianship of former occupations. Further augmentation of educator roles, however, appeared constrained by market approaches to development and employment insecurity in the sector and beyond. In Archer’s terms, the current environment appears to cast ‘dual professionalism’ as morphostasis, drawing on former practice at the expense of teacher identity in the face of insecurity. Morphogenesis into enhanced professional teacher identities, for example, developing coherent vocational pedagogies informed by research into advances in knowledge, appears the less likely outcome in the current and emerging sector.


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