• Supporting STEM students into STEM careers: A practical introduction for academics

      Hooley, Tristram; Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (iCeGS, University of Derby, 2012)
      Graduate employability is increasingly becoming a selection criteria used by students in their choice of university and discipline. It is also used as a metric for the quality assessment of institutions and the construction of the various league tables produced by newspapers and other media outlets. In addition to identifying levels of employment, further study and unemployment, graduates’ employment destinations are classified as “graduate” or “non-graduate” jobs. The distinction between “graduate” and “non-graduate” is also important for the various metrics that are produced from the destinations data.6 To evidence that a particular course or discipline supports graduate employability it is therefore important not only that graduates are able to find work, but also that they can find work of an appropriate level. A STEM degree should be a clear asset in achieving this aim of finding graduate level employment.
    • The use of power in self and collective interests of retailers and small apparel suppliers’ relationships

      Talay, Cagri; Oxborrow, Lynn; Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University; University of Derby (2017-07-07)
    • What the Dickens? Representations of women's entrepreneurship in the work of Charles Dickens

      Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Irish Academy of Management, 2015)
    • Who Are We, Where Do We Come From, Where Are We Going To? Greek Cypriot Women Artists in Contemporary Cyprus

      Photiou, Maria; Loughborough University (Taylor & Francis Publishers, 2012)
      This article is about Greek Cypriot women artists. In particular it concerns their art, their careers, and their relation to politics; the way they were influenced by politics in Cyprus and how they represented the political upheavals of the time in their own practice. Although all these artists experienced the several phases of Cypriot history in a different way, they all have something in common: the fact that these artists were women living in a colonised, patriarchal country under Greek Cypriot nationality. Their practices are the result of what they experienced and an analysis of their work will reveal the artistic strategies they applied as a response to the politics in Cypriot society.
    • Women and new business creation-breaking down the risk barriers

      Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Routledge, 2007)