• Employers and schools: how Mansfield is building a world of work approach

      Hutchinson, Jo; Dickinson, Berni; University of Derby, iCeGS (2014)
      There is a keen interest in encouraging employers to engage with schools so that young people can learn more about careers, understand the skills that employers are interested in, broaden their aspirations and be motivated to succeed. Employer engagement in schools in England however is increasingly fragmented because of a loss of brokering infrastructure. This article describes a partnership approach developed in Mansfield where a consortium of local schools has worked with their business community and public sector organisations. Together they have listened to what young people say they both want and need to know about careers and then responded by providing a strategic careers learning programme. The particular contribution of the Mansfield Learning Partnership which is wholly funded by the town’s secondary schools is detailed in the article alongside elaboration of the Mansfield Framework for Career Learning which provides a work experience programme and several imaginative opportunities for young people to engage in meaningful encounters with employers,
    • Enabling the SME is sustainable procurement: a case study

      Oxborrow, Lynn; Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Institute for Small Business and Entrepeurship, 2011)
    • Evaluation of the NAHT Aspire

      Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; Hooley, Tristram; Hewitt, Des; Mieschbuehler, Ruth; Dodd, Vanessa; Langley, Emma; University of Derby, College of Education (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2015-01)
      Data collected for this second interim report through a survey, telephone interviews and site visits indicates that the NAHT Aspire Partner Schools Programme has over a short period of time demonstrated an effective approach to school improvement. Significant is that 14 schools have been rated ‘Good’ by Ofsted. Schools have particularly welcomed and benefited from the adopted approach which emphasises; • Distributed leadership which empowers staff to take on a leadership role for the five strands; • Achievement Teams which build problem focused solutions, a positive climate for staff to feel valued and improved use of data within schools; • A whole school approach to school improvement through adoption and implementation of core values; • Peer support provided through Network Days and in school through Development Days; and • Staff development through training, coaching and the 2-6-2 meeting models. Survey evidence suggested that school leaders and teachers have a lot of confidence now that their school will change for the better (97% agreed or strongly agreed with this statement). Furthermore they reported that they have the right strategy and short term priorities to effect change that will impact upon teaching and pupil attainment. There was overall a high level of confidence (99%) that teaching and pupil’s learning would improve as a result of involvement in the programme. The dedicated support provided by NAHT Aspire Achievement Advisers offers a unique and valued aspect to the programme which provides localised bespoke training and consultancy to schools in the programme. Leadership capacity was identified as a concern by Ofsted in the three pilot schools that were judged to be ‘Inadequate’ and this factor was reflected in termly reviews of the schools’ success in implementing NAHT Aspire prior to the inspections. The programme is considered to provide value for money by schools, and may represent especially good value when compared with the costs of academisation. There have been a few withdrawals to date and these have been predominantly as a result of Ofsted inspections where schools have been judged ‘Good’ or have moved to ‘Special Measures’. It would be interesting to continue to monitor the outcomes of the programme over the coming years and to assess progression from ‘Good’ to ‘Outstanding.’
    • Gambling over the Internet

      Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (IGI Global, 2006)
      Gambling providers have begun to exploit the Internet as a vehicle for marketing their products and services. This article discusses the increase in Internet gambling and how the gambling industry has exploited technology to make market gains. Gambling on the Internet is a billion-dollar industry, with online lotteries and pools generating more than half of the total market value (i.e., $1.66 billion). There is a plethora of gambling opportunities, such as casino games and online games, and horse and event betting, although inevitably some of the rules of the games have had to be adapted to operate via the new medium. The home-based nature of interactive gambling means that consumers are no longer restricted by opening hours, social status, or membership requirements, and are able to choose from a wide selection of gambling sites. The nature of the response by gambling organizations to the changes in consumer behavior has depended on the willingness of providers to become online providers, domestic and/or international legislation, and of course Internet service provision, all of which will differ depending on the gambling products offered.
    • Gendered horizons: boys' and girls' perceptions of job and career choices

      Hutchinson, Jo; Moore, Nicki; Davies, Andrew; Thomas, Malcolm; Marriott, John; University of Derby; Aberystwyth University (Chwarae Teg, 2013)
      At what age and how do children in Wales form ideas about work and gender? The research study report in Gendered Horizons draws on evidence from stakeholder interviews, a survey of parents, interviews with children in primary school and young people in secondary school and a literature review. It finds that children and young people’s awareness of gendered roles in the workplace is not well developed for example they do not recognise the pay and progression implications of their expressed choices or a range of work roles. Whilst the younger children were still expressing their career ambitions in terms of fantasy roles that were clearly stereotypical in most cases, the older age group were also predominantly talking about job roles that they saw around them and roles that conformed to stereotypical gender roles, such as psychology for girls, working outdoors for boys, and teaching for both genders. In their mid-teens these young people did however have a better understanding of the world of work and of associated gender expectations. Furthermore, some of them expressed ideas about consciously challenging those stereotypes. There was consensus that young people need good guidance on was what their options were. While there is always debate on when career-related learning should start, there was agreement that it had to be before Year 9 when subject choices needed to be made. There was some evidence from the stakeholders that suggested that if young people are given opportunities to see workplaces, to talk to people who work in those places (whether introduced through family or school or other networks), then they are more likely to consider these as possibilities. Further, if they are supported with a programme of career learning they will know where to find information about pay, employment conditions, job opportunities, qualification requirements and career progression –they will understand why knowledge of these matters is important and will begin to challenge stereotypical thinking that underpins career choices.
    • 'Girls into STEM and Komm mach MINT’: English and German approaches to support girls’ STEM career-related learning

      Hutchinson, Jo; University of Derby, iCeGS (NICEC, 2014-04)
      European economies require STEM skilled people, yet compared with boys, girls demonstrate a tendency to reject some STEM study and STEM careers. This paper briefly reviews key factors that influence this phenomenon. It then introduces four examples of campaigns and initiatives that encourage girls to consider further participation in STEM in England and MINT in Germany as part of their career ambitions. Evidence of the impact of German initiatives is presented. It concludes that where there is a deliberate strategy linked with defined actions which tackle issues that are specific to girls, then gender imbalances can begin to change.
    • Government intervention in women's entrepreneurship development: the Bumiputera craft industry

      Topimin, Salmah; Brindley, Clare; Foster, Carley; Nottingham Trent University (Institute for Small Business and Entrepeurship, 2015)
    • Holocaust education and contemporary antisemitism

      Allwork Larissa; The University of Derby (History and Policy, 2019-11-29)
      This working paper explores the relationship between Holocaust education and efforts to combat antisemitism across Europe. It synthesizes a diverse evidence base for policy-makers, which illustrates both the strengths and limitations of Holocaust education as a method for sensitizing young people to antisemitism. It concludes with recommendations for future action in Holocaust education. This working paper was researched and written for CEJI - A Jewish Contribution to an Inclusive Europe in August 2019. It is under consideration for publication with 'History and Policy'.
    • Holocaust remembrance as ‘civil religion’: the case of the Stockholm Declaration.

      Allwork Larissa; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015-07)
    • Holocaust remembrance between the national and the transnational: the Stockholm International Forum and the first decade of the International Task Force.

      Allwork Larissa; University of Derby (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015-07-30)
      'Holocaust Remembrance Between the National and the Transnational' provides a key study of the remembrance of the Jewish Catastrophe and the Nazi-era past in the world arena. It uses a range of primary documentation from the restitution conferences, speeches and presentations made at the Stockholm International Forum of 2000 (SIF 2000), a global event and an attempt to mark a defining moment in the inter-cultural construction of the political and institutional memory of the Holocaust in the USA, Europe and Israel. Containing oral history interviews with delegates to the conference and contemporary press reports, this book explores the inter-relationships between global and national Holocaust remembrances.
    • Homo‐ and heteroleptic phototoxic dinuclear metallo‐intercalators based on Ru II(dppn) intercalating moieties: synthesis, optical and biological studies.

      Saeed, Hiwa K.; Jarman, Paul J.; Archer, Stuart; Sreedharan, Sreejesh; Saeed, Ibrahim Q.; Mckenzie, Luke K.; Weinstein, Julia A.; Buurma, Niklaas J.; Smythe, Carl G. W.; Thomas, Jim A.; et al. (Wiley, 2017-09-27)
      Using a new mononuclear “building block,” for the first time, a dinuclear RuII(dppn) complex and a heteroleptic system containing both RuII(dppz) and RuII(dppn) moieties are reported. The complexes, including the mixed dppz/dppn system, are 1O2 sensitizers. However, unlike the homoleptic dppn systems, the mixed dppz/dppn complex also displays a luminescence “switch on” DNA light‐switch effect. In both cisplatin sensitive and resistant human ovarian carcinoma lines the dinuclear complexes show enhanced uptake compared to their mononuclear analogue. Thanks to a favorable combination of singlet oxygen generation and cellular uptake properties all three of the new complexes are phototoxic and display potent activity against chemotherapeutically resistant cells.
    • How do young people (in the region) form their views on future learning and career options?

      Hutchinson, Jo; Parker, Gordon; University of Derby, iCeGS (iCeGS - International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2009)
      The research informed the activities of the Regional Employment and Skills Partnership, and more specifically to “inform the future development of labour market intelligence (LMI) to support the provision of employment related information advice and guidance (IAG) to support young people”. This report provides the 14 – 19 Commission with a literature review which: • highlights the core principles of young people’s decision-making processes; • takes into consideration research which discusses the cognitive changes that young people undergo between the ages of 14 -19; • focuses on structural issues, which affect young peoples views on future work and learning options; • Investigates the significance of place and locale in the formation of young people’s views and decision making in a manner that is mindful of the identity of the North East region.
    • How small suppliers deal with the buyer power in asymmetric relationships within the sustainable fashion supply chain.

      Talay, Cagri; Oxborrow, Lynn; Brindley, Clare; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University (Elsevier, 2018-09-05)
      This research investigates the application of power by retail buyers and how fashion suppliers deal with the application of power within sustainable supply chains by focusing on the experience of six small fashion suppliers. Using an exploratory case methodology, the empirical findings demonstrate that power is applied by enforcing collaborations and extension of responsibilities of fashion suppliers. Small fashion suppliers deal with the application of power by providing process efficiency that supports the performance of economic, environmental and social sustainable goals of retail buyers within sustainable supply chains. This research contributes by linking the concept of power and sustainability within fashion supply chains. The paper concludes by evaluating the application of power by retail buyers and fashion suppliers' responses.
    • ICT adoption by SMEs: implications for relationships and management

      Ritchie, Bob; Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Wiley, 2005)
      A conceptual model of the changes in small and medium enterprise interfaces and relationships consequent on their adoption of information and communication technologies is developed and explored in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the implications for management, employees and working practices. Empirical evidence from two organisations is provided to illustrate the model and corroborate this new perspective.
    • The information-risk conundrum

      Ritchie, Bob; Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2001)
      Information technologies have been deliberately targeted towards enhancing database access, analytical powers and the communications capacity of marketers. The justification for these efforts has been based on the premise that more and better quality information will result in reduced uncertainty and improved risk perceptions in decision situations. This premiss is examined in the context of decision maker behaviour, drawing on empirical research involving 50 managers undertaking strategic analysis and decisions. The research methodology employed a computer?based simulation of a strategic decision situation, enabling the managers to access structured information databases to support their decision making. Concludes that the initial perceptions of uncertainty and risk relating to the decisions faced are unlikely to be modified irrespective of the quantity or quality of the information transmitted and processed by the decision maker. The evidence suggests that the decision maker may also construct their decision?taking behaviour to constrain the opportunity for new information to alter the initial perceptions and choices made.
    • Interrogating Europe's voids of memory: trauma theory and Holocaust remembrance between the national and the transnational.

      Allwork Larissa; University of Derby (Journal of Fondazione CDEC, 2016-12-16)
      Reflecting on the research process for 'Holocaust Remembrance between the National and the Transnational' (HRNT), which explores and analyzes the significance of the European and global politics of the commemoration of the Holocaust and Nazi-era crimes in the late 1990s and 2000s, this article will consider the influence of the intellectual context of trauma theory for this book. It will offer a response to the increasing critique of Eurocentric trauma theory which developed during the period spent researching the Stockholm International Forum (SIF 2000) and the first decade of the Task Force for International Co-operation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research (ITF, now the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance, IHRA). This article will discuss how a revised trauma theory, along the lines suggested by scholars such as Joshua Pederson, continues to offer important possibilities for European studies of the histories and memories of the Holocaust in singular and comparative terms.
    • Legal coercion, respect & reason-responsive agency

      Lee, Ambrose Y. K.; University of Oxford, Centre for Criminology (Springer, 2013)
      Legal coercion seems morally problematic because it is susceptible to the Hegelian objection that it fails to respect individuals in a way that is ‘due to them as men’. But in what sense does legal coercion fail to do so? And what are the grounds for this requirement to respect? This paper is an attempt to answer these questions. It argues that (a) legal coercion fails to respect individuals as reason-responsive agents; and (b) individuals ought to be respected as such in virtue of the fact that they are human beings. Thus it is in this sense that legal coercion fails to treat individuals with the kind of respect ‘due to them as men’.
    • Let’s talk about peace over dinner: A cultural experience on memory, dislocation and the politics of belonging in Cyprus.

      Photiou, Maria; University of Derby (Intellect, 2018-04-23)
      On Saturday 9 April 2011, Greek Cypriot artist Lia Lapithi invited a group of eighteen guests to join her for her own version of the Last Supper, a four-course dinner that took place in the warehouse of an old furniture factory in Nicosia, Cyprus. The dinner was the first project of a series of orchestrated meals that Lapithi hosted and participated, where the theme was hospitality and politics in Cyprus.1 Significant to Lapithi’s work are autobiographical experiences and the geopolitical division of Cyprus. Born in 1963 in Cyprus, Lapithi experienced at a young age the traumatic 1974 division of Cyprus and the on-going occupation of half of the island by Turkey.2 This article explores the significance of an orchestrated meal for the politics of belonging and remembering in contemporary Cyprus. It analyses the representation of the event by Lapithi, who engaged in questioning the meaning of peace by serving food as a ‘medium’ and as a ‘symbol of peace’. It also explores Lapithi’s strategies in communicating her own memories and experiences as a refugee who can visit her family’s house over the occupied northern side of Cyprus only as a guest. Through the discussion of food/taste and visuals, this article will consider how the dinner acts as a means of catharsis for the participants and develops a critical understanding of contemporary events in Cyprus and our reaction to them.
    • The marketing of gambling on the Internet

      Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 1999)
      It is estimated that gambling on the Internet will be worth as much as $3bn by 2001. Gambling via interactive technology is already underpinned by two recent changes in consumer behaviour. First, increasing familiarisation with interactive technology and second, by changes in the way the gambling market operates. These already changing behaviour patterns, signal the success drivers on which gambling on the internet can build. The implications of this new leisure consumption pattern are discussed and the paper concludes that the synergy between marketing gambling and technology will transform the production and consumption of gambling.
    • Organizational ambidexterity and the emerging-to-advanced economy nexus: Cases from private higher education operators in the United Kingdom

      Stokes, Peter; Moore, Neil; Smith, Simon M.; Larson, Mitchell J.; Brindley, Clare; De Montfort University; University of Chester; University of Winchester; University of Central Lancashire; Nottingham Trent University (2016-07-25)
      The expansion of advanced-market economy (AME) firms into emerging-market economies (EME) is well documented. In recent decades, EME companies have moved increasingly into AMEs, especially within the manufacturing sector, as well as other important AME sectors such as higher education (HE). However, the latter have received less attention. This study conducts an in-depth qualitative analysis of two EME HE organizations operating in the international HE sector in London. The argument applies a theoretical framework of organizational ambidexterity with which to examine the contexts and complexities in collaborations between EME-HE and AME-HE firms. These argument surfaces, inter alia: differing dynamics in relation to institutional frameworks and sense making; myopic internationalization; tensions regarding organizational reputation, place, partner, and product legitimization; unfulfilled reverse innovation and “explorative-pull” phenomena. Overall, the article develops novel conceptual frameworks of practical relevance, which inform EME-AME firm collaborative operations in AME settings. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.