• School organisation and STEM career-related learning

      Hutchinson, Jo; University of Derby (National STEM Centre, 2013)
      The aim of the research project has been to identify the range of factors that shape senior leadership team decisions with regards to STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) career-related learning. Evidence has shown that the support of school senior leaders and their organisation of STEM within the school is highly significant in determining the success of STEM in an individual school. This research points to the importance of management structures within schools which prioritise career-related learning and provide effective support for all teaching staff to play their part. The findings support schools investing in senior teachers to provide career-related learning for pupils. The report goes on to identify the factors influencing senior leaders in taking forward STEM career-related learning across their school. The report explores how schools can enhance their STEM career-related learning provision, both within their local context, but also in the context of shifting policy and infrastructure. It examines, in particular, commissioning career guidance services, staff development, and the role of school strategy. The report closes with a series of recommendations for schools to consider.
    • Self-employed Irish women's entrepreneurial risk behaviour

      Humbert, Anne Laure; Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Institute for Small Business and Entrepeurship, 2011)
    • ‘Smart Cities’ – Dynamic sustainability issues and challenges for ‘old world’ economies: A case from the United Kingdom

      Stokes, Peter; Larson, Mitchell J.; Russell, Natalie; Adderley, Simon; Moore, Neil; Mathews, Martin; Smith, Simon M.; Lichy, Jessica; Scott, Peter; Ward, Tony; et al. (2015-11-30)
      The rapid and dynamic rate of urbanization, particularly in emerging world economies, has resulted in a need to find sustainable ways of dealing with the excessive strains and pressures that come to bear on existing infrastructures and relationships. Increasingly during the twenty-first century policy makers have turned to technological solutions to deal with this challenge and the dynamics inherent within it. This move towards the utilization of technology to underpin infrastructure has led to the emergence of the term ‘Smart City’. Smart cities incorporate technology based solutions in their planning development and operation. This paper explores the organizational issues and challenges facing a post-industrial agglomeration in the North West of England as it attempted to become a ‘Smart City’. In particular the paper identifies and discusses the factors that posed significant challenges for the dynamic relationships residents, policymakers and public and private sector organizations and as a result aims to use these micro-level issues to inform the macro-debate and context of wider Smart City discussions. In order to achieve this, the paper develops a range of recommendations that are designed to inform Smart City design, planning and implementation strategies.
    • SMEs & the Internet: a comparative study - China and the UK.

      Ritchie, Bob; Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Elgar, 2005)
    • STEM subjects and jobs: a longitudinal perspective of attitudes among Key Stage 3 students, 2008 - 2010

      Hutchinson, Jo; Bentley, Kieran; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby., 2011-03)
      The STEM Careers Awareness Timelines initiative was part of Action Programme 8 which ran between 2008 to 2011. The project was undertaken by the Centre for Education and Industry at the University of Warwick, the International Centre for Guidance Studies at the University of Derby and Isinglass Consultancy. The project enlisted 30 schools to pilot the initiatives across England. Nominated school contacts initially assessed their school in relation to delivery of STEM subjects and careers. Through mentoring arrangements and regional events, these schools were then supported through their design and delivery of careers awareness timelines – or programmes of activities within the curriculum - designed to increase the awareness of young people about STEM subjects and related careers options. Surveys of young people were also undertaken that were designed to capture opinions on STEM subjects and thoughts about STEM careers. The first of these surveys (which we refer to as Wave One) took place from September 2008 until March 2009. The second (Wave Two) lasted from September 2010 until February 2011. The staggered approach, focusing two surveys with many of the same questions on the same schools two years apart, allowed for a comparison of attitudes at the beginning and at the end of the project. This longitudinal perspective facilitated an assessment of change both within a cohort and between school years. Wave One of the research generated 4073 completed questionnaires from year seven and year nine students from 27 schools. Wave Two of the research received 2216 responses from a total of 19 of the pilot schools.
    • Strategic consultation on the FE workforce and Initial Teacher Education workforce for the Education & Training Foundation

      Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; Marriott, John; Jackson, Heather; University of Derby, iCeGS (2014)
      A research project undertaken on behalf of the Education and Training Foundation exploring barriers to attracting candidates with higher qualifications and skills to the FE sector and to explores if ITE predominantly attracts people from a humanities background. The report suggests that people move into FE teaching through opportunity. The issue if dual professionalism is an important element of identity. Those becoming teacher educators tend to drift into the role. Discussions were focused less on the background of people but on the space they have to deliver a curriculum which includes pedagogy theory and the extent to which ITE need to have subject specialisms to prepare teachers for effective classroom practice.
    • Supply chain risk

      Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Ashgate, 2004)
      The impact of technological change, globalization, information and communication technologies and international governmental intervention has radically altered supply chain strategies, operations and risk profiles for most organizations. The challenge facing business and researchers alike is how best to address risk management in this new context. This collection, written by international scholars from the UK, US and Scandinavia, addresses this need by providing the first topical review of these developments and the latest research findings. The findings represent a robust cross-disciplinary view of supply chains, articulating policies and strategies for organizations. The research studies are based on empirical case studies within services and manufacturing in both large and SME organizations. This work is intended to provide the foundation for future research in this expanding area and the impact it has on managing risk within the supply chain.
    • Supply chain risk management and performance: issues and challenges

      Ritchie, Bob; Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Springer, 2008)
    • Supply chain risk management and performance: a guiding framework for future development

      Ritchie, Bob; Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2007)
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the constructs underpinning risk management and explores its application in the supply chain context through the development of a framework. The constructs of performance and risk are matched together to provide new perspectives for researchers and practitioners. Design/methodology/approach The conceptual and empirical work in the supply chain management field and other related fields is employed to develop a conceptual framework of supply chain risk management (SCRM). Risk in the supply chain is explored in terms of risk/performance sources, drivers, consequences and management responses, including initial approaches to categorization within these. Two empirical cases are used to illustrate the application of the framework. Findings A new framework is presented that helps to integrate the dimensions of risk and performance in supply chains and provide a categorisation of risk drivers. Research limitations/implications SCRM is at an early stage of evolution. The paper provides a clarification of the dimensions and constructs within this field together with directions for future research and development. Practical implications The focus on performance in terms of efficiency and effectiveness linked to risk drivers and risk management responses provides insights to managing and measuring risk in supply chains. Originality/value The paper consolidates the work in an emerging strand of supply chain management. Two key challenges facing the research community are addressed, the ability to prescribe strategies to address particular risk drivers and the interaction of risk management and performance.
    • Supporting STEM students into STEM careers: A practical introduction for academics

      Hooley, Tristram; Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (iCeGS, University of Derby, 2012)
      Graduate employability is increasingly becoming a selection criteria used by students in their choice of university and discipline. It is also used as a metric for the quality assessment of institutions and the construction of the various league tables produced by newspapers and other media outlets. In addition to identifying levels of employment, further study and unemployment, graduates’ employment destinations are classified as “graduate” or “non-graduate” jobs. The distinction between “graduate” and “non-graduate” is also important for the various metrics that are produced from the destinations data.6 To evidence that a particular course or discipline supports graduate employability it is therefore important not only that graduates are able to find work, but also that they can find work of an appropriate level. A STEM degree should be a clear asset in achieving this aim of finding graduate level employment.
    • The use of power in self and collective interests of retailers and small apparel suppliers’ relationships

      Talay, Cagri; Oxborrow, Lynn; Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University; University of Derby (2017-07-07)
    • What the Dickens? Representations of women's entrepreneurship in the work of Charles Dickens

      Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Irish Academy of Management, 2015)
    • Who Are We, Where Do We Come From, Where Are We Going To? Greek Cypriot Women Artists in Contemporary Cyprus

      Photiou, Maria; Loughborough University (Taylor & Francis Publishers, 2012)
      This article is about Greek Cypriot women artists. In particular it concerns their art, their careers, and their relation to politics; the way they were influenced by politics in Cyprus and how they represented the political upheavals of the time in their own practice. Although all these artists experienced the several phases of Cypriot history in a different way, they all have something in common: the fact that these artists were women living in a colonised, patriarchal country under Greek Cypriot nationality. Their practices are the result of what they experienced and an analysis of their work will reveal the artistic strategies they applied as a response to the politics in Cypriot society.
    • Women and new business creation-breaking down the risk barriers

      Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Routledge, 2007)