• The marketing of gambling on the Internet

      Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 1999)
      It is estimated that gambling on the Internet will be worth as much as $3bn by 2001. Gambling via interactive technology is already underpinned by two recent changes in consumer behaviour. First, increasing familiarisation with interactive technology and second, by changes in the way the gambling market operates. These already changing behaviour patterns, signal the success drivers on which gambling on the internet can build. The implications of this new leisure consumption pattern are discussed and the paper concludes that the synergy between marketing gambling and technology will transform the production and consumption of gambling.
    • Organizational ambidexterity and the emerging-to-advanced economy nexus: Cases from private higher education operators in the United Kingdom

      Stokes, Peter; Moore, Neil; Smith, Simon M.; Larson, Mitchell J.; Brindley, Clare; De Montfort University; University of Chester; University of Winchester; University of Central Lancashire; Nottingham Trent University (2016-07-25)
      The expansion of advanced-market economy (AME) firms into emerging-market economies (EME) is well documented. In recent decades, EME companies have moved increasingly into AMEs, especially within the manufacturing sector, as well as other important AME sectors such as higher education (HE). However, the latter have received less attention. This study conducts an in-depth qualitative analysis of two EME HE organizations operating in the international HE sector in London. The argument applies a theoretical framework of organizational ambidexterity with which to examine the contexts and complexities in collaborations between EME-HE and AME-HE firms. These argument surfaces, inter alia: differing dynamics in relation to institutional frameworks and sense making; myopic internationalization; tensions regarding organizational reputation, place, partner, and product legitimization; unfulfilled reverse innovation and “explorative-pull” phenomena. Overall, the article develops novel conceptual frameworks of practical relevance, which inform EME-AME firm collaborative operations in AME settings. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    • Partnership, capital formation and equality and diversity: learning from five case studies

      Hutchinson, Jo; University of Derby (Institute of Career Guidance, 2011-11)
      Careers education, information, advice and guidance (CEIAG) should challenge stereotypes, promote equality of opportunity and celebrate diversity (DCSF, 2008). Its delivery requires a range of people, organisations and services that bring together their services and networks to focus on individual needs. The co-ordination of these multiple agencies is referred to in this paper as partnership working. Together, these elements of firstly careers work, secondly equality and diversity, and thirdly partnership working form the substance of this paper. In the spring of 2010 the International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) with the National Institute for Social and Economic Research (NIESR) conducted fieldwork among case study projects. They were identified by the sector as representing examples of good and innovative practice that focussed on the range of equality and diversity issues in the delivery of CEIAG to young people. This was part of a project commissioned by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC, 2011). These case studies were chosen to reflect the various equality strands, covering England, Scotland and Wales and were not necessarily ‘CEIAG projects’, rather they recognise that careers work is a part of young people’s overall needs and thus CEIAG becomes part of the overall intervention strategy. Using these case studies the paper explores the idea that effective working has to be based on the creation or utilisation of aspects of local capital (Putnam, 2000; Kintrea et al, 2008); namely political, financial, organisational and social capital. The case studies all demonstrated that a range of conditional factors needed to be in place for projects to develop and thrive. The paper introduces the various well-rehearsed factors which shape effective partnership working (Hutchinson and Campbell, 1998; Connexions, 2003; Ford, 2005; LSIS, 2009) before going on to observe some of the processes that the case studies demonstrated in terms of transformational behaviours, personalisation and challenge. It concludes that the concept of capital formation with its focus on connections, reciprocity and trust helps to illuminate some of the motivators and drivers of partnership working.
    • Personalized relationship e-marketing and the small and medium sized enterprise

      Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (IGI Global, 2006)
      Many small businesses are beginning to adopt at least tactical solutions to enhance relationships between themselves and their customers. This chapter focuses on a UK-based marketing communications company which has developed an innovative personalized relationship e-marketing tool, utilizing mobile technology aimed at the SME sector. Current marketing practices, such as database marketing and CRM systems, are discussed in terms of SME adoption and whether the tool, Sign-Up.to is an effective replacement for established CRM systems. The authors conclude that while the case study company has developed a tool that will aid SMEs with their relationship marketing, the philosophy of relationship marketing must already be imbedded within the SME. The authors' intention is to illustrate how technology can be implemented in the SME sector and to explore how technology and marketing can help each other.
    • Public wrongs and the criminal law

      Lee, Ambrose Y. K.; University of Oxford, Centre for Criminology (Springer, 2013-03-05)
      This paper is about how best to understand the notion of ‘public wrongs’ in the longstanding idea that crimes are public wrongs. By contrasting criminal law with the civil laws of torts and contracts, it argues that ‘public wrongs’ should not be understood merely as wrongs that properly concern the public, but more specifically as those which the state, as the public, ought to punish. It then briefly considers the implications that this has on criminalization.
    • Reducing risk in information search activities

      Ritchie, Bob; Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (IGI Global, 2004)
      This chapter proposes that the initial perceptions of uncertainty and risk relating to decision making are unlikely to be modified irrespective of the quantity or quality of the information transmitted and processed by the decision maker. It argues that initial risk perceptions and decisions are fairly robust even when confronted with contradictory information. The chapter begins by offering definitions of the key terms such as risk, uncertainty, and the components of the digital economy. The authors then provide an overview of risk assessment and associated management processes before moving onto an examination of the contribution of intelligence and information to risk resolution. A case scenario provides a practical illustration of the issues raised.
    • Regional resilience in recessionary times: a case study of the East Midlands

      Oxborrow, Lynn; Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2012)
      Purpose: Since the 1990's the fashion industry has reflected the issues generally arising in the manufacturing sector, namely rapid and deep structural changes, the development of new supply chain relationships, ICT impacts and increasing globalisation with the attendant issues of ethical sourcing, off-shoring, new emerging markets and recessionary ripples. This paper focuses on one particular aspect of the fashion industry, namely the apparel sector and in particular 'fast fashion' to explore the issues arising for the SMEs in the supply chain. Approach: The research adopts a qualitative methodology and is longitudinal in nature, spanning 5 years from August 2006. The first stage of the research is reported here, where a series of focussed interview scenarios were conducted over an eighteenth month period. The sample of 12 SMEs was a convenience one, drawn from the 30 participants who took part in a business to business event in Leicester, a geographical location which acts as a microcosm of the apparel industry. Interviews were used to elicit narrative data about was what was actually happening in these apparel supply chains. Findings: The apparel supply chain has changed significantly due to recessionary ripples and structural changes. The SMEs have had more success in managing the upstream rather than the downstream relationships and relationships between buyer and suppliers continue to be fractious. Innovation has occurred but is hampered by the relationships that persist. Culture has proved to be a key dimension.
    • A retailer's perspective of customer loyalty

      Keegan, J.; Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Academy of Marketing, 2011)
    • Risk and women's entrepreneurship: the Irish context

      Brindley, Clare; Humbert, Anne Laure; Nottingham Trent University (Institute for Small Business and Entrepeurship, 2011)
    • Risk assessment and relationship management: practical approach to supply chain risk management

      Ritchie, Bob; Brindley, Clare; Armstrong, Nick; Nottingham Trent University (Inderscience Enterprises, 2008)
      The literature suggests the need for incorporating the risk construct into the measurement of organisational performance, although few examples are available as to how this might be undertaken in relation to supply chains. A conceptual framework for the development of performance and risk management within the supply chain is evolved from the literature and empirical evidence. The twin levels of dyadic performance/risk management and the management of a portfolio of performance/risks is addressed, employing Agency Theory to guide the analysis. The empirical evidence relates to the downstream management of dealerships by a large multinational organisation. Propositions are derived from the analysis relating to the issues and mechanisms that may be employed to effectively manage a portfolio of supply chain performance and risks.
    • Risk management in the digital economy

      Ritchie, Bob; Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (IGI Global, 2009)
    • School organisation and STEM career-related learning

      Hutchinson, Jo; University of Derby (National STEM Centre, 2013)
      The aim of the research project has been to identify the range of factors that shape senior leadership team decisions with regards to STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) career-related learning. Evidence has shown that the support of school senior leaders and their organisation of STEM within the school is highly significant in determining the success of STEM in an individual school. This research points to the importance of management structures within schools which prioritise career-related learning and provide effective support for all teaching staff to play their part. The findings support schools investing in senior teachers to provide career-related learning for pupils. The report goes on to identify the factors influencing senior leaders in taking forward STEM career-related learning across their school. The report explores how schools can enhance their STEM career-related learning provision, both within their local context, but also in the context of shifting policy and infrastructure. It examines, in particular, commissioning career guidance services, staff development, and the role of school strategy. The report closes with a series of recommendations for schools to consider.
    • Self-employed Irish women's entrepreneurial risk behaviour

      Humbert, Anne Laure; Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Institute for Small Business and Entrepeurship, 2011)
    • ‘Smart Cities’ – Dynamic sustainability issues and challenges for ‘old world’ economies: A case from the United Kingdom

      Stokes, Peter; Larson, Mitchell J.; Russell, Natalie; Adderley, Simon; Moore, Neil; Mathews, Martin; Smith, Simon M.; Lichy, Jessica; Scott, Peter; Ward, Tony; et al. (2015-11-30)
      The rapid and dynamic rate of urbanization, particularly in emerging world economies, has resulted in a need to find sustainable ways of dealing with the excessive strains and pressures that come to bear on existing infrastructures and relationships. Increasingly during the twenty-first century policy makers have turned to technological solutions to deal with this challenge and the dynamics inherent within it. This move towards the utilization of technology to underpin infrastructure has led to the emergence of the term ‘Smart City’. Smart cities incorporate technology based solutions in their planning development and operation. This paper explores the organizational issues and challenges facing a post-industrial agglomeration in the North West of England as it attempted to become a ‘Smart City’. In particular the paper identifies and discusses the factors that posed significant challenges for the dynamic relationships residents, policymakers and public and private sector organizations and as a result aims to use these micro-level issues to inform the macro-debate and context of wider Smart City discussions. In order to achieve this, the paper develops a range of recommendations that are designed to inform Smart City design, planning and implementation strategies.
    • SMEs & the Internet: a comparative study - China and the UK.

      Ritchie, Bob; Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Elgar, 2005)
    • STEM subjects and jobs: a longitudinal perspective of attitudes among Key Stage 3 students, 2008 - 2010

      Hutchinson, Jo; Bentley, Kieran; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby., 2011-03)
      The STEM Careers Awareness Timelines initiative was part of Action Programme 8 which ran between 2008 to 2011. The project was undertaken by the Centre for Education and Industry at the University of Warwick, the International Centre for Guidance Studies at the University of Derby and Isinglass Consultancy. The project enlisted 30 schools to pilot the initiatives across England. Nominated school contacts initially assessed their school in relation to delivery of STEM subjects and careers. Through mentoring arrangements and regional events, these schools were then supported through their design and delivery of careers awareness timelines – or programmes of activities within the curriculum - designed to increase the awareness of young people about STEM subjects and related careers options. Surveys of young people were also undertaken that were designed to capture opinions on STEM subjects and thoughts about STEM careers. The first of these surveys (which we refer to as Wave One) took place from September 2008 until March 2009. The second (Wave Two) lasted from September 2010 until February 2011. The staggered approach, focusing two surveys with many of the same questions on the same schools two years apart, allowed for a comparison of attitudes at the beginning and at the end of the project. This longitudinal perspective facilitated an assessment of change both within a cohort and between school years. Wave One of the research generated 4073 completed questionnaires from year seven and year nine students from 27 schools. Wave Two of the research received 2216 responses from a total of 19 of the pilot schools.
    • Strategic consultation on the FE workforce and Initial Teacher Education workforce for the Education & Training Foundation

      Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; Marriott, John; Jackson, Heather; University of Derby, iCeGS (2014)
      A research project undertaken on behalf of the Education and Training Foundation exploring barriers to attracting candidates with higher qualifications and skills to the FE sector and to explores if ITE predominantly attracts people from a humanities background. The report suggests that people move into FE teaching through opportunity. The issue if dual professionalism is an important element of identity. Those becoming teacher educators tend to drift into the role. Discussions were focused less on the background of people but on the space they have to deliver a curriculum which includes pedagogy theory and the extent to which ITE need to have subject specialisms to prepare teachers for effective classroom practice.
    • Supply chain risk

      Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Ashgate, 2004)
      The impact of technological change, globalization, information and communication technologies and international governmental intervention has radically altered supply chain strategies, operations and risk profiles for most organizations. The challenge facing business and researchers alike is how best to address risk management in this new context. This collection, written by international scholars from the UK, US and Scandinavia, addresses this need by providing the first topical review of these developments and the latest research findings. The findings represent a robust cross-disciplinary view of supply chains, articulating policies and strategies for organizations. The research studies are based on empirical case studies within services and manufacturing in both large and SME organizations. This work is intended to provide the foundation for future research in this expanding area and the impact it has on managing risk within the supply chain.
    • Supply chain risk management and performance: issues and challenges

      Ritchie, Bob; Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Springer, 2008)
    • Supply chain risk management and performance: a guiding framework for future development

      Ritchie, Bob; Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2007)
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the constructs underpinning risk management and explores its application in the supply chain context through the development of a framework. The constructs of performance and risk are matched together to provide new perspectives for researchers and practitioners. Design/methodology/approach The conceptual and empirical work in the supply chain management field and other related fields is employed to develop a conceptual framework of supply chain risk management (SCRM). Risk in the supply chain is explored in terms of risk/performance sources, drivers, consequences and management responses, including initial approaches to categorization within these. Two empirical cases are used to illustrate the application of the framework. Findings A new framework is presented that helps to integrate the dimensions of risk and performance in supply chains and provide a categorisation of risk drivers. Research limitations/implications SCRM is at an early stage of evolution. The paper provides a clarification of the dimensions and constructs within this field together with directions for future research and development. Practical implications The focus on performance in terms of efficiency and effectiveness linked to risk drivers and risk management responses provides insights to managing and measuring risk in supply chains. Originality/value The paper consolidates the work in an emerging strand of supply chain management. Two key challenges facing the research community are addressed, the ability to prescribe strategies to address particular risk drivers and the interaction of risk management and performance.