• Developing business. developing careers: how and why employers are supporting the career development of their employees.

      Hutchinson, Jo; Devins, David; Hooley, Tristram; Kelsey, Sarah; University of Derby, iCeGS; Leeds Metropolitan University, Policy Research Institute (PRI) (UKCES, 2012)
    • Gendered horizons: boys' and girls' perceptions of job and career choices

      Hutchinson, Jo; Moore, Nicki; Davies, Andrew; Thomas, Malcolm; Marriott, John; University of Derby; Aberystwyth University (Chwarae Teg, 2013)
      At what age and how do children in Wales form ideas about work and gender? The research study report in Gendered Horizons draws on evidence from stakeholder interviews, a survey of parents, interviews with children in primary school and young people in secondary school and a literature review. It finds that children and young people’s awareness of gendered roles in the workplace is not well developed for example they do not recognise the pay and progression implications of their expressed choices or a range of work roles. Whilst the younger children were still expressing their career ambitions in terms of fantasy roles that were clearly stereotypical in most cases, the older age group were also predominantly talking about job roles that they saw around them and roles that conformed to stereotypical gender roles, such as psychology for girls, working outdoors for boys, and teaching for both genders. In their mid-teens these young people did however have a better understanding of the world of work and of associated gender expectations. Furthermore, some of them expressed ideas about consciously challenging those stereotypes. There was consensus that young people need good guidance on was what their options were. While there is always debate on when career-related learning should start, there was agreement that it had to be before Year 9 when subject choices needed to be made. There was some evidence from the stakeholders that suggested that if young people are given opportunities to see workplaces, to talk to people who work in those places (whether introduced through family or school or other networks), then they are more likely to consider these as possibilities. Further, if they are supported with a programme of career learning they will know where to find information about pay, employment conditions, job opportunities, qualification requirements and career progression –they will understand why knowledge of these matters is important and will begin to challenge stereotypical thinking that underpins career choices.
    • STEM subjects and jobs: a longitudinal perspective of attitudes among Key Stage 3 students, 2008 - 2010

      Hutchinson, Jo; Bentley, Kieran; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby., 2011-03)
      The STEM Careers Awareness Timelines initiative was part of Action Programme 8 which ran between 2008 to 2011. The project was undertaken by the Centre for Education and Industry at the University of Warwick, the International Centre for Guidance Studies at the University of Derby and Isinglass Consultancy. The project enlisted 30 schools to pilot the initiatives across England. Nominated school contacts initially assessed their school in relation to delivery of STEM subjects and careers. Through mentoring arrangements and regional events, these schools were then supported through their design and delivery of careers awareness timelines – or programmes of activities within the curriculum - designed to increase the awareness of young people about STEM subjects and related careers options. Surveys of young people were also undertaken that were designed to capture opinions on STEM subjects and thoughts about STEM careers. The first of these surveys (which we refer to as Wave One) took place from September 2008 until March 2009. The second (Wave Two) lasted from September 2010 until February 2011. The staggered approach, focusing two surveys with many of the same questions on the same schools two years apart, allowed for a comparison of attitudes at the beginning and at the end of the project. This longitudinal perspective facilitated an assessment of change both within a cohort and between school years. Wave One of the research generated 4073 completed questionnaires from year seven and year nine students from 27 schools. Wave Two of the research received 2216 responses from a total of 19 of the pilot schools.
    • Supporting STEM students into STEM careers: A practical introduction for academics

      Hooley, Tristram; Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (iCeGS, University of Derby, 2012)
      Graduate employability is increasingly becoming a selection criteria used by students in their choice of university and discipline. It is also used as a metric for the quality assessment of institutions and the construction of the various league tables produced by newspapers and other media outlets. In addition to identifying levels of employment, further study and unemployment, graduates’ employment destinations are classified as “graduate” or “non-graduate” jobs. The distinction between “graduate” and “non-graduate” is also important for the various metrics that are produced from the destinations data.6 To evidence that a particular course or discipline supports graduate employability it is therefore important not only that graduates are able to find work, but also that they can find work of an appropriate level. A STEM degree should be a clear asset in achieving this aim of finding graduate level employment.