• All things being equal?: equality and diversity in Careers education, information, advice and guidance

      Hutchinson, Jo; Rolfe, Heather; Moore, Nicki; Bysshe, Simon; Bentley, Kieran; University of Derby (Equality and Human Rights Commission, 2011)
      In its education chapter, the Commission’s first Triennial Review of evidence on inequality, How Fair is Britain? Equality, Human Rights and Good Relations in 2010, found that educational attainment has been transformed in recent years. Around half of young people are now getting good qualifications at 16 (5+ A*-C GCSEs or equivalent including English and Maths) and, in 2008/09, 2.4 million students enrolled in higher education in the UK – a considerable change from a time when educational opportunities were only available to a minority of young people. However, the evidence shows that educational attainment continues to be strongly associated with socio-economic background. Stereotypical information and guidance can limit young people’s options and aspirations at an early age. Careers advice often reinforces traditional choices and young people have limited information on the pay advantages of nontraditional routes. Nearly one in four young people say that they have not had enough information to make choices for their future. This rises to just under a quarter of disabled young people.
    • Be/come closer to home: Narratives of contested lands in the visual practices of Katerina Attalidou and Alexandra Handal

      Photiou, Maria; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 27/05/2016)
      Women from Cyprus and Palestine are citizens of divided countries and have experienced conspiracies and invasions that have confiscated their homelands. This article investigates visual practices of women artists and the ways in which they are embedded in the space of each location. It aims to reflect on artists' experiences of borders, location and narrations of homeland. It focuses on the artistic practices of Greek-Cypriot artist Katerina Attalidou and Alexandra Handal, who engage in questioning and challenging issues on homeland, borders, history, citizenship, identity and exile. This article will enquire as to how the idea of homeland 'real or imagined' is represented in visual works and will investigate how the usage of images and narratives can challenge the concept of home. Through the discussion of images this article will consider how these practices serve as a reminder of exile and develop a critical understanding of contemporary events and our reaction to them.
    • The D2N2 employability framework: Employers and schools supporting young people's routes to work

      Hutchinson, Jo; Dickinson, Berni; Vickers, Rob; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (D2N2, 2015)
      The D2N2 Employability Framework provides the methodology by which we can significantly improve the employability and life skills of our young people regardless of academic ability or which career pathway they chose to take. Collectively schools, colleges, training providers, wealth creating companies, social enterprises and the public sector have a duty to ensure that we give our young people the best chances in gaining employment and at the same time addressing the skills needs of employers within our area.
    • Delivering NEET policy packages? A decade of NEET policy in England

      Hutchinson, Jo; Beck, Vanessa; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby; University of Leicester (Taylor and Francis, 2015)
      This article explores the way in which government policy shapes the lives of young people who are not in education, employment or training (NEET). In particular it examines how the concept of NEETs is set within a specific infrastructure and discourse for managing and supporting young people. The article provides a brief history of the NEET concept and NEET initiatives, before moving on to scrutinise the policies of the Coalition Government. A key distinction is made between those policies and practices that seek to prevent young people becoming NEET from those that seek to re-engage those who are NEET. It is argued that the Coalition has drawn on a similar active labour market toolkit to the previous Labour administration, but that this has been implemented with fewer resources and less co-ordination. It concludes that there is little reason to believe that Coalition policy will be any more successful than that of the previous government, and some reason to be concerned that it will lead to young people becoming more entrenched within NEET.
    • Education to employment: complicated transitions in a changing world

      Hutchinson, Jo; Kettlewell, Kelly; University of Derby (2015)
      The editorial presents a collection of papers which highlight the complex nature of supporting all young people as they move out of statutory education. They illuminate some of the real concerns and problems related to the NEETs phenomenon. By drawing together this body of research and interrogating it, it has been possible to peel back the label ‘NEET’, look beyond the rhetoric and highlight an increasingly sophisticated understanding of the limitations and applications of the label that can provide the basis for international exchange of research findings. Above all, taken together, the papers suggest that the experience of NEET is not homogeneous. This is something that needs to be understood and acknowledged to a far greater extent if policy is to result in actions that truly support young people’s transitions from education to employment.
    • Gendered horizons: boys' and girls' perceptions of job and career choices

      Hutchinson, Jo; Moore, Nicki; Davies, Andrew; Thomas, Malcolm; Marriott, John; University of Derby; Aberystwyth University (Chwarae Teg, 2013)
      At what age and how do children in Wales form ideas about work and gender? The research study report in Gendered Horizons draws on evidence from stakeholder interviews, a survey of parents, interviews with children in primary school and young people in secondary school and a literature review. It finds that children and young people’s awareness of gendered roles in the workplace is not well developed for example they do not recognise the pay and progression implications of their expressed choices or a range of work roles. Whilst the younger children were still expressing their career ambitions in terms of fantasy roles that were clearly stereotypical in most cases, the older age group were also predominantly talking about job roles that they saw around them and roles that conformed to stereotypical gender roles, such as psychology for girls, working outdoors for boys, and teaching for both genders. In their mid-teens these young people did however have a better understanding of the world of work and of associated gender expectations. Furthermore, some of them expressed ideas about consciously challenging those stereotypes. There was consensus that young people need good guidance on was what their options were. While there is always debate on when career-related learning should start, there was agreement that it had to be before Year 9 when subject choices needed to be made. There was some evidence from the stakeholders that suggested that if young people are given opportunities to see workplaces, to talk to people who work in those places (whether introduced through family or school or other networks), then they are more likely to consider these as possibilities. Further, if they are supported with a programme of career learning they will know where to find information about pay, employment conditions, job opportunities, qualification requirements and career progression –they will understand why knowledge of these matters is important and will begin to challenge stereotypical thinking that underpins career choices.
    • Holocaust remembrance as ‘civil religion’: the case of the Stockholm Declaration.

      Allwork Larissa; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015-07)
    • Holocaust remembrance between the national and the transnational: the Stockholm International Forum and the first decade of the International Task Force.

      Allwork Larissa; University of Derby (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015-07-30)
      'Holocaust Remembrance Between the National and the Transnational' provides a key study of the remembrance of the Jewish Catastrophe and the Nazi-era past in the world arena. It uses a range of primary documentation from the restitution conferences, speeches and presentations made at the Stockholm International Forum of 2000 (SIF 2000), a global event and an attempt to mark a defining moment in the inter-cultural construction of the political and institutional memory of the Holocaust in the USA, Europe and Israel. Containing oral history interviews with delegates to the conference and contemporary press reports, this book explores the inter-relationships between global and national Holocaust remembrances.
    • How small suppliers deal with the buyer power in asymmetric relationships within the sustainable fashion supply chain.

      Talay, Cagri; Oxborrow, Lynn; Brindley, Clare; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University (Elsevier, 2018-09-05)
      This research investigates the application of power by retail buyers and how fashion suppliers deal with the application of power within sustainable supply chains by focusing on the experience of six small fashion suppliers. Using an exploratory case methodology, the empirical findings demonstrate that power is applied by enforcing collaborations and extension of responsibilities of fashion suppliers. Small fashion suppliers deal with the application of power by providing process efficiency that supports the performance of economic, environmental and social sustainable goals of retail buyers within sustainable supply chains. This research contributes by linking the concept of power and sustainability within fashion supply chains. The paper concludes by evaluating the application of power by retail buyers and fashion suppliers' responses.
    • Interrogating Europe's voids of memory: trauma theory and Holocaust remembrance between the national and the transnational.

      Allwork Larissa; University of Derby (Journal of Fondazione CDEC, 2016-12-16)
      Reflecting on the research process for 'Holocaust Remembrance between the National and the Transnational' (HRNT), which explores and analyzes the significance of the European and global politics of the commemoration of the Holocaust and Nazi-era crimes in the late 1990s and 2000s, this article will consider the influence of the intellectual context of trauma theory for this book. It will offer a response to the increasing critique of Eurocentric trauma theory which developed during the period spent researching the Stockholm International Forum (SIF 2000) and the first decade of the Task Force for International Co-operation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research (ITF, now the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance, IHRA). This article will discuss how a revised trauma theory, along the lines suggested by scholars such as Joshua Pederson, continues to offer important possibilities for European studies of the histories and memories of the Holocaust in singular and comparative terms.
    • Let’s talk about peace over dinner: A cultural experience on memory, dislocation and the politics of belonging in Cyprus.

      Photiou, Maria; University of Derby (Intellect, 01/10/2017)
      On Saturday 9 April 2011, Greek Cypriot artist Lia Lapithi invited a group of eighteen guests to join her for her own version of the Last Supper, a four-course dinner that took place in the warehouse of an old furniture factory in Nicosia, Cyprus. The dinner was the first project of a series of orchestrated meals that Lapithi hosted and participated, where the theme was hospitality and politics in Cyprus.1 Significant to Lapithi’s work are autobiographical experiences and the geopolitical division of Cyprus. Born in 1963 in Cyprus, Lapithi experienced at a young age the traumatic 1974 division of Cyprus and the on-going occupation of half of the island by Turkey.2 This article explores the significance of an orchestrated meal for the politics of belonging and remembering in contemporary Cyprus. It analyses the representation of the event by Lapithi, who engaged in questioning the meaning of peace by serving food as a ‘medium’ and as a ‘symbol of peace’. It also explores Lapithi’s strategies in communicating her own memories and experiences as a refugee who can visit her family’s house over the occupied northern side of Cyprus only as a guest. Through the discussion of food/taste and visuals, this article will consider how the dinner acts as a means of catharsis for the participants and develops a critical understanding of contemporary events in Cyprus and our reaction to them.
    • Partnership, capital formation and equality and diversity: learning from five case studies

      Hutchinson, Jo; University of Derby (Institute of Career Guidance, 2011-11)
      Careers education, information, advice and guidance (CEIAG) should challenge stereotypes, promote equality of opportunity and celebrate diversity (DCSF, 2008). Its delivery requires a range of people, organisations and services that bring together their services and networks to focus on individual needs. The co-ordination of these multiple agencies is referred to in this paper as partnership working. Together, these elements of firstly careers work, secondly equality and diversity, and thirdly partnership working form the substance of this paper. In the spring of 2010 the International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) with the National Institute for Social and Economic Research (NIESR) conducted fieldwork among case study projects. They were identified by the sector as representing examples of good and innovative practice that focussed on the range of equality and diversity issues in the delivery of CEIAG to young people. This was part of a project commissioned by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC, 2011). These case studies were chosen to reflect the various equality strands, covering England, Scotland and Wales and were not necessarily ‘CEIAG projects’, rather they recognise that careers work is a part of young people’s overall needs and thus CEIAG becomes part of the overall intervention strategy. Using these case studies the paper explores the idea that effective working has to be based on the creation or utilisation of aspects of local capital (Putnam, 2000; Kintrea et al, 2008); namely political, financial, organisational and social capital. The case studies all demonstrated that a range of conditional factors needed to be in place for projects to develop and thrive. The paper introduces the various well-rehearsed factors which shape effective partnership working (Hutchinson and Campbell, 1998; Connexions, 2003; Ford, 2005; LSIS, 2009) before going on to observe some of the processes that the case studies demonstrated in terms of transformational behaviours, personalisation and challenge. It concludes that the concept of capital formation with its focus on connections, reciprocity and trust helps to illuminate some of the motivators and drivers of partnership working.
    • School organisation and STEM career-related learning

      Hutchinson, Jo; University of Derby (National STEM Centre, 2013)
      The aim of the research project has been to identify the range of factors that shape senior leadership team decisions with regards to STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) career-related learning. Evidence has shown that the support of school senior leaders and their organisation of STEM within the school is highly significant in determining the success of STEM in an individual school. This research points to the importance of management structures within schools which prioritise career-related learning and provide effective support for all teaching staff to play their part. The findings support schools investing in senior teachers to provide career-related learning for pupils. The report goes on to identify the factors influencing senior leaders in taking forward STEM career-related learning across their school. The report explores how schools can enhance their STEM career-related learning provision, both within their local context, but also in the context of shifting policy and infrastructure. It examines, in particular, commissioning career guidance services, staff development, and the role of school strategy. The report closes with a series of recommendations for schools to consider.
    • STEM subjects and jobs: a longitudinal perspective of attitudes among Key Stage 3 students, 2008 - 2010

      Hutchinson, Jo; Bentley, Kieran; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby., 2011-03)
      The STEM Careers Awareness Timelines initiative was part of Action Programme 8 which ran between 2008 to 2011. The project was undertaken by the Centre for Education and Industry at the University of Warwick, the International Centre for Guidance Studies at the University of Derby and Isinglass Consultancy. The project enlisted 30 schools to pilot the initiatives across England. Nominated school contacts initially assessed their school in relation to delivery of STEM subjects and careers. Through mentoring arrangements and regional events, these schools were then supported through their design and delivery of careers awareness timelines – or programmes of activities within the curriculum - designed to increase the awareness of young people about STEM subjects and related careers options. Surveys of young people were also undertaken that were designed to capture opinions on STEM subjects and thoughts about STEM careers. The first of these surveys (which we refer to as Wave One) took place from September 2008 until March 2009. The second (Wave Two) lasted from September 2010 until February 2011. The staggered approach, focusing two surveys with many of the same questions on the same schools two years apart, allowed for a comparison of attitudes at the beginning and at the end of the project. This longitudinal perspective facilitated an assessment of change both within a cohort and between school years. Wave One of the research generated 4073 completed questionnaires from year seven and year nine students from 27 schools. Wave Two of the research received 2216 responses from a total of 19 of the pilot schools.
    • Supporting STEM students into STEM careers: A practical introduction for academics

      Hooley, Tristram; Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (iCeGS, University of Derby, 2012)
      Graduate employability is increasingly becoming a selection criteria used by students in their choice of university and discipline. It is also used as a metric for the quality assessment of institutions and the construction of the various league tables produced by newspapers and other media outlets. In addition to identifying levels of employment, further study and unemployment, graduates’ employment destinations are classified as “graduate” or “non-graduate” jobs. The distinction between “graduate” and “non-graduate” is also important for the various metrics that are produced from the destinations data.6 To evidence that a particular course or discipline supports graduate employability it is therefore important not only that graduates are able to find work, but also that they can find work of an appropriate level. A STEM degree should be a clear asset in achieving this aim of finding graduate level employment.
    • The use of power in self and collective interests of retailers and small apparel suppliers’ relationships

      Talay, Cagri; Oxborrow, Lynn; Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University; University of Derby (2017-07-07)