• All things being equal?: equality and diversity in Careers education, information, advice and guidance

      Hutchinson, Jo; Rolfe, Heather; Moore, Nicki; Bysshe, Simon; Bentley, Kieran; University of Derby (Equality and Human Rights Commission, 2011)
      In its education chapter, the Commission’s first Triennial Review of evidence on inequality, How Fair is Britain? Equality, Human Rights and Good Relations in 2010, found that educational attainment has been transformed in recent years. Around half of young people are now getting good qualifications at 16 (5+ A*-C GCSEs or equivalent including English and Maths) and, in 2008/09, 2.4 million students enrolled in higher education in the UK – a considerable change from a time when educational opportunities were only available to a minority of young people. However, the evidence shows that educational attainment continues to be strongly associated with socio-economic background. Stereotypical information and guidance can limit young people’s options and aspirations at an early age. Careers advice often reinforces traditional choices and young people have limited information on the pay advantages of nontraditional routes. Nearly one in four young people say that they have not had enough information to make choices for their future. This rises to just under a quarter of disabled young people.
    • Career ambitions of teenage mothers: customer insight research

      Hutchinson, Jo; Moore, Nicki; University of Derby, iCeGS (iCeGS - International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2012)
      Teenage pregnancy is more common in some areas and among some groups of young women. Rates of teenage pregnancy in socially deprived areas are higher than the national average. Because of its association with deprivation, in 1999 the Social Exclusion Unit set out targets to Local Authorities to reduce the numbers of conceptions and increase the participation of young mothers in education, training and employment. Progress towards reducing conceptions has been steady but slow as the figure below from Nottinghamshire shows. It remains concentrated in geographic ‘hot spots’ in both the City and the County. Similarly fewer than 30% of young mothers in the City or the County are in education, employment or training. This research sought to find out more about these young women. Through interviews and data analysis the research explored the motivations and factors that influence when or whether a young mother will return to the labour market.
    • Career learning journeys of Derby and Derbyshire NEETs

      Hutchinson, Jo; Korzeniewski, Richard; Moore, Nicki; University of Derby, iCeGS (iCeGS - International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2011-03)
      Young people (aged under 25 years) typically represent a third of all unemployed people across Derby and Derbyshire. The numbers of young people aged between 16 and 18 years old who are either not in education, employment or training (known as NEETs) in Derby and Derbyshire is a concern for local communities, businesses, support organisations, and families. In early 2010 changes to support services and structures were being undertaken, whilst at the same time the economic downturn was affecting opportunities for employment and training. The opportunity that arose at this time through the EMIEP project to undertake research both about, and with, the local NEET population was seized upon locally as a way to better understand the realities of being NEET through systematic analysis of the NCCIS database alongside qualitative analysis of interviews with 40 young people who were categorised as NEET. It finds that those young people with multiple disadvantage feel better supported by services than those whose NEET status derived from just one or two disadvantaging factors.
    • Gendered horizons: boys' and girls' perceptions of job and career choices

      Hutchinson, Jo; Moore, Nicki; Davies, Andrew; Thomas, Malcolm; Marriott, John; University of Derby; Aberystwyth University (Chwarae Teg, 2013)
      At what age and how do children in Wales form ideas about work and gender? The research study report in Gendered Horizons draws on evidence from stakeholder interviews, a survey of parents, interviews with children in primary school and young people in secondary school and a literature review. It finds that children and young people’s awareness of gendered roles in the workplace is not well developed for example they do not recognise the pay and progression implications of their expressed choices or a range of work roles. Whilst the younger children were still expressing their career ambitions in terms of fantasy roles that were clearly stereotypical in most cases, the older age group were also predominantly talking about job roles that they saw around them and roles that conformed to stereotypical gender roles, such as psychology for girls, working outdoors for boys, and teaching for both genders. In their mid-teens these young people did however have a better understanding of the world of work and of associated gender expectations. Furthermore, some of them expressed ideas about consciously challenging those stereotypes. There was consensus that young people need good guidance on was what their options were. While there is always debate on when career-related learning should start, there was agreement that it had to be before Year 9 when subject choices needed to be made. There was some evidence from the stakeholders that suggested that if young people are given opportunities to see workplaces, to talk to people who work in those places (whether introduced through family or school or other networks), then they are more likely to consider these as possibilities. Further, if they are supported with a programme of career learning they will know where to find information about pay, employment conditions, job opportunities, qualification requirements and career progression –they will understand why knowledge of these matters is important and will begin to challenge stereotypical thinking that underpins career choices.