• All things being equal?: equality and diversity in Careers education, information, advice and guidance

      Hutchinson, Jo; Rolfe, Heather; Moore, Nicki; Bysshe, Simon; Bentley, Kieran; University of Derby (Equality and Human Rights Commission, 2011)
      In its education chapter, the Commission’s first Triennial Review of evidence on inequality, How Fair is Britain? Equality, Human Rights and Good Relations in 2010, found that educational attainment has been transformed in recent years. Around half of young people are now getting good qualifications at 16 (5+ A*-C GCSEs or equivalent including English and Maths) and, in 2008/09, 2.4 million students enrolled in higher education in the UK – a considerable change from a time when educational opportunities were only available to a minority of young people. However, the evidence shows that educational attainment continues to be strongly associated with socio-economic background. Stereotypical information and guidance can limit young people’s options and aspirations at an early age. Careers advice often reinforces traditional choices and young people have limited information on the pay advantages of nontraditional routes. Nearly one in four young people say that they have not had enough information to make choices for their future. This rises to just under a quarter of disabled young people.
    • Career ambitions of teenage mothers: customer insight research

      Hutchinson, Jo; Moore, Nicki; University of Derby, iCeGS (iCeGS - International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2012)
      Teenage pregnancy is more common in some areas and among some groups of young women. Rates of teenage pregnancy in socially deprived areas are higher than the national average. Because of its association with deprivation, in 1999 the Social Exclusion Unit set out targets to Local Authorities to reduce the numbers of conceptions and increase the participation of young mothers in education, training and employment. Progress towards reducing conceptions has been steady but slow as the figure below from Nottinghamshire shows. It remains concentrated in geographic ‘hot spots’ in both the City and the County. Similarly fewer than 30% of young mothers in the City or the County are in education, employment or training. This research sought to find out more about these young women. Through interviews and data analysis the research explored the motivations and factors that influence when or whether a young mother will return to the labour market.
    • Career learning journeys of Derby and Derbyshire NEETs

      Hutchinson, Jo; Korzeniewski, Richard; Moore, Nicki; University of Derby, iCeGS (iCeGS - International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2011-03)
      Young people (aged under 25 years) typically represent a third of all unemployed people across Derby and Derbyshire. The numbers of young people aged between 16 and 18 years old who are either not in education, employment or training (known as NEETs) in Derby and Derbyshire is a concern for local communities, businesses, support organisations, and families. In early 2010 changes to support services and structures were being undertaken, whilst at the same time the economic downturn was affecting opportunities for employment and training. The opportunity that arose at this time through the EMIEP project to undertake research both about, and with, the local NEET population was seized upon locally as a way to better understand the realities of being NEET through systematic analysis of the NCCIS database alongside qualitative analysis of interviews with 40 young people who were categorised as NEET. It finds that those young people with multiple disadvantage feel better supported by services than those whose NEET status derived from just one or two disadvantaging factors.
    • Career-related learning and science education: the changing landscape

      Hutchinson, Jo; University of Derby, iCeGS (The Association for Science Education, 2012)
      Pupils ask STEM subject teachers about jobs and careers in science, but where else do they learn about work? This article outlines career-related learning within schools in England alongside other factors that influence pupils’ career decisions. The effect of the Education Act 2011 will be to change career learning in schools. The impact on science educators as advisers, facilitators, commissioners or managers of career-related learning is discussed, with a conclusion that, while science educators are not career educators, they nevertheless can support career-related learning in their delivery of the curriculum alongside enhancement and enrichment activities.
    • The D2N2 employability framework: Employers and schools supporting young people's routes to work

      Hutchinson, Jo; Dickinson, Berni; Vickers, Rob; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (D2N2, 2015)
      The D2N2 Employability Framework provides the methodology by which we can significantly improve the employability and life skills of our young people regardless of academic ability or which career pathway they chose to take. Collectively schools, colleges, training providers, wealth creating companies, social enterprises and the public sector have a duty to ensure that we give our young people the best chances in gaining employment and at the same time addressing the skills needs of employers within our area.
    • Delivering NEET policy packages? A decade of NEET policy in England

      Hutchinson, Jo; Beck, Vanessa; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby; University of Leicester (Taylor and Francis, 2015)
      This article explores the way in which government policy shapes the lives of young people who are not in education, employment or training (NEET). In particular it examines how the concept of NEETs is set within a specific infrastructure and discourse for managing and supporting young people. The article provides a brief history of the NEET concept and NEET initiatives, before moving on to scrutinise the policies of the Coalition Government. A key distinction is made between those policies and practices that seek to prevent young people becoming NEET from those that seek to re-engage those who are NEET. It is argued that the Coalition has drawn on a similar active labour market toolkit to the previous Labour administration, but that this has been implemented with fewer resources and less co-ordination. It concludes that there is little reason to believe that Coalition policy will be any more successful than that of the previous government, and some reason to be concerned that it will lead to young people becoming more entrenched within NEET.
    • Developing business. developing careers: how and why employers are supporting the career development of their employees.

      Hutchinson, Jo; Devins, David; Hooley, Tristram; Kelsey, Sarah; University of Derby, iCeGS; Leeds Metropolitan University, Policy Research Institute (PRI) (UKCES, 2012)
    • Education to employment: complicated transitions in a changing world

      Hutchinson, Jo; Kettlewell, Kelly; University of Derby (2015)
      The editorial presents a collection of papers which highlight the complex nature of supporting all young people as they move out of statutory education. They illuminate some of the real concerns and problems related to the NEETs phenomenon. By drawing together this body of research and interrogating it, it has been possible to peel back the label ‘NEET’, look beyond the rhetoric and highlight an increasingly sophisticated understanding of the limitations and applications of the label that can provide the basis for international exchange of research findings. Above all, taken together, the papers suggest that the experience of NEET is not homogeneous. This is something that needs to be understood and acknowledged to a far greater extent if policy is to result in actions that truly support young people’s transitions from education to employment.
    • Employers and schools: how Mansfield is building a world of work approach

      Hutchinson, Jo; Dickinson, Berni; University of Derby, iCeGS (2014)
      There is a keen interest in encouraging employers to engage with schools so that young people can learn more about careers, understand the skills that employers are interested in, broaden their aspirations and be motivated to succeed. Employer engagement in schools in England however is increasingly fragmented because of a loss of brokering infrastructure. This article describes a partnership approach developed in Mansfield where a consortium of local schools has worked with their business community and public sector organisations. Together they have listened to what young people say they both want and need to know about careers and then responded by providing a strategic careers learning programme. The particular contribution of the Mansfield Learning Partnership which is wholly funded by the town’s secondary schools is detailed in the article alongside elaboration of the Mansfield Framework for Career Learning which provides a work experience programme and several imaginative opportunities for young people to engage in meaningful encounters with employers,
    • Evaluation of the NAHT Aspire

      Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; Hooley, Tristram; Hewitt, Des; Mieschbuehler, Ruth; Dodd, Vanessa; Langley, Emma; University of Derby, College of Education (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2015-01)
      Data collected for this second interim report through a survey, telephone interviews and site visits indicates that the NAHT Aspire Partner Schools Programme has over a short period of time demonstrated an effective approach to school improvement. Significant is that 14 schools have been rated ‘Good’ by Ofsted. Schools have particularly welcomed and benefited from the adopted approach which emphasises; • Distributed leadership which empowers staff to take on a leadership role for the five strands; • Achievement Teams which build problem focused solutions, a positive climate for staff to feel valued and improved use of data within schools; • A whole school approach to school improvement through adoption and implementation of core values; • Peer support provided through Network Days and in school through Development Days; and • Staff development through training, coaching and the 2-6-2 meeting models. Survey evidence suggested that school leaders and teachers have a lot of confidence now that their school will change for the better (97% agreed or strongly agreed with this statement). Furthermore they reported that they have the right strategy and short term priorities to effect change that will impact upon teaching and pupil attainment. There was overall a high level of confidence (99%) that teaching and pupil’s learning would improve as a result of involvement in the programme. The dedicated support provided by NAHT Aspire Achievement Advisers offers a unique and valued aspect to the programme which provides localised bespoke training and consultancy to schools in the programme. Leadership capacity was identified as a concern by Ofsted in the three pilot schools that were judged to be ‘Inadequate’ and this factor was reflected in termly reviews of the schools’ success in implementing NAHT Aspire prior to the inspections. The programme is considered to provide value for money by schools, and may represent especially good value when compared with the costs of academisation. There have been a few withdrawals to date and these have been predominantly as a result of Ofsted inspections where schools have been judged ‘Good’ or have moved to ‘Special Measures’. It would be interesting to continue to monitor the outcomes of the programme over the coming years and to assess progression from ‘Good’ to ‘Outstanding.’
    • Gendered horizons: boys' and girls' perceptions of job and career choices

      Hutchinson, Jo; Moore, Nicki; Davies, Andrew; Thomas, Malcolm; Marriott, John; University of Derby; Aberystwyth University (Chwarae Teg, 2013)
      At what age and how do children in Wales form ideas about work and gender? The research study report in Gendered Horizons draws on evidence from stakeholder interviews, a survey of parents, interviews with children in primary school and young people in secondary school and a literature review. It finds that children and young people’s awareness of gendered roles in the workplace is not well developed for example they do not recognise the pay and progression implications of their expressed choices or a range of work roles. Whilst the younger children were still expressing their career ambitions in terms of fantasy roles that were clearly stereotypical in most cases, the older age group were also predominantly talking about job roles that they saw around them and roles that conformed to stereotypical gender roles, such as psychology for girls, working outdoors for boys, and teaching for both genders. In their mid-teens these young people did however have a better understanding of the world of work and of associated gender expectations. Furthermore, some of them expressed ideas about consciously challenging those stereotypes. There was consensus that young people need good guidance on was what their options were. While there is always debate on when career-related learning should start, there was agreement that it had to be before Year 9 when subject choices needed to be made. There was some evidence from the stakeholders that suggested that if young people are given opportunities to see workplaces, to talk to people who work in those places (whether introduced through family or school or other networks), then they are more likely to consider these as possibilities. Further, if they are supported with a programme of career learning they will know where to find information about pay, employment conditions, job opportunities, qualification requirements and career progression –they will understand why knowledge of these matters is important and will begin to challenge stereotypical thinking that underpins career choices.
    • 'Girls into STEM and Komm mach MINT’: English and German approaches to support girls’ STEM career-related learning

      Hutchinson, Jo; University of Derby, iCeGS (NICEC, 2014-04)
      European economies require STEM skilled people, yet compared with boys, girls demonstrate a tendency to reject some STEM study and STEM careers. This paper briefly reviews key factors that influence this phenomenon. It then introduces four examples of campaigns and initiatives that encourage girls to consider further participation in STEM in England and MINT in Germany as part of their career ambitions. Evidence of the impact of German initiatives is presented. It concludes that where there is a deliberate strategy linked with defined actions which tackle issues that are specific to girls, then gender imbalances can begin to change.
    • How do young people (in the region) form their views on future learning and career options?

      Hutchinson, Jo; Parker, Gordon; University of Derby, iCeGS (iCeGS - International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2009)
      The research informed the activities of the Regional Employment and Skills Partnership, and more specifically to “inform the future development of labour market intelligence (LMI) to support the provision of employment related information advice and guidance (IAG) to support young people”. This report provides the 14 – 19 Commission with a literature review which: • highlights the core principles of young people’s decision-making processes; • takes into consideration research which discusses the cognitive changes that young people undergo between the ages of 14 -19; • focuses on structural issues, which affect young peoples views on future work and learning options; • Investigates the significance of place and locale in the formation of young people’s views and decision making in a manner that is mindful of the identity of the North East region.
    • Partnership, capital formation and equality and diversity: learning from five case studies

      Hutchinson, Jo; University of Derby (Institute of Career Guidance, 2011-11)
      Careers education, information, advice and guidance (CEIAG) should challenge stereotypes, promote equality of opportunity and celebrate diversity (DCSF, 2008). Its delivery requires a range of people, organisations and services that bring together their services and networks to focus on individual needs. The co-ordination of these multiple agencies is referred to in this paper as partnership working. Together, these elements of firstly careers work, secondly equality and diversity, and thirdly partnership working form the substance of this paper. In the spring of 2010 the International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) with the National Institute for Social and Economic Research (NIESR) conducted fieldwork among case study projects. They were identified by the sector as representing examples of good and innovative practice that focussed on the range of equality and diversity issues in the delivery of CEIAG to young people. This was part of a project commissioned by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC, 2011). These case studies were chosen to reflect the various equality strands, covering England, Scotland and Wales and were not necessarily ‘CEIAG projects’, rather they recognise that careers work is a part of young people’s overall needs and thus CEIAG becomes part of the overall intervention strategy. Using these case studies the paper explores the idea that effective working has to be based on the creation or utilisation of aspects of local capital (Putnam, 2000; Kintrea et al, 2008); namely political, financial, organisational and social capital. The case studies all demonstrated that a range of conditional factors needed to be in place for projects to develop and thrive. The paper introduces the various well-rehearsed factors which shape effective partnership working (Hutchinson and Campbell, 1998; Connexions, 2003; Ford, 2005; LSIS, 2009) before going on to observe some of the processes that the case studies demonstrated in terms of transformational behaviours, personalisation and challenge. It concludes that the concept of capital formation with its focus on connections, reciprocity and trust helps to illuminate some of the motivators and drivers of partnership working.
    • School organisation and STEM career-related learning

      Hutchinson, Jo; University of Derby (National STEM Centre, 2013)
      The aim of the research project has been to identify the range of factors that shape senior leadership team decisions with regards to STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) career-related learning. Evidence has shown that the support of school senior leaders and their organisation of STEM within the school is highly significant in determining the success of STEM in an individual school. This research points to the importance of management structures within schools which prioritise career-related learning and provide effective support for all teaching staff to play their part. The findings support schools investing in senior teachers to provide career-related learning for pupils. The report goes on to identify the factors influencing senior leaders in taking forward STEM career-related learning across their school. The report explores how schools can enhance their STEM career-related learning provision, both within their local context, but also in the context of shifting policy and infrastructure. It examines, in particular, commissioning career guidance services, staff development, and the role of school strategy. The report closes with a series of recommendations for schools to consider.
    • STEM subjects and jobs: a longitudinal perspective of attitudes among Key Stage 3 students, 2008 - 2010

      Hutchinson, Jo; Bentley, Kieran; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby., 2011-03)
      The STEM Careers Awareness Timelines initiative was part of Action Programme 8 which ran between 2008 to 2011. The project was undertaken by the Centre for Education and Industry at the University of Warwick, the International Centre for Guidance Studies at the University of Derby and Isinglass Consultancy. The project enlisted 30 schools to pilot the initiatives across England. Nominated school contacts initially assessed their school in relation to delivery of STEM subjects and careers. Through mentoring arrangements and regional events, these schools were then supported through their design and delivery of careers awareness timelines – or programmes of activities within the curriculum - designed to increase the awareness of young people about STEM subjects and related careers options. Surveys of young people were also undertaken that were designed to capture opinions on STEM subjects and thoughts about STEM careers. The first of these surveys (which we refer to as Wave One) took place from September 2008 until March 2009. The second (Wave Two) lasted from September 2010 until February 2011. The staggered approach, focusing two surveys with many of the same questions on the same schools two years apart, allowed for a comparison of attitudes at the beginning and at the end of the project. This longitudinal perspective facilitated an assessment of change both within a cohort and between school years. Wave One of the research generated 4073 completed questionnaires from year seven and year nine students from 27 schools. Wave Two of the research received 2216 responses from a total of 19 of the pilot schools.
    • Strategic consultation on the FE workforce and Initial Teacher Education workforce for the Education & Training Foundation

      Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; Marriott, John; Jackson, Heather; University of Derby, iCeGS (2014)
      A research project undertaken on behalf of the Education and Training Foundation exploring barriers to attracting candidates with higher qualifications and skills to the FE sector and to explores if ITE predominantly attracts people from a humanities background. The report suggests that people move into FE teaching through opportunity. The issue if dual professionalism is an important element of identity. Those becoming teacher educators tend to drift into the role. Discussions were focused less on the background of people but on the space they have to deliver a curriculum which includes pedagogy theory and the extent to which ITE need to have subject specialisms to prepare teachers for effective classroom practice.
    • Supporting STEM students into STEM careers: A practical introduction for academics

      Hooley, Tristram; Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (iCeGS, University of Derby, 2012)
      Graduate employability is increasingly becoming a selection criteria used by students in their choice of university and discipline. It is also used as a metric for the quality assessment of institutions and the construction of the various league tables produced by newspapers and other media outlets. In addition to identifying levels of employment, further study and unemployment, graduates’ employment destinations are classified as “graduate” or “non-graduate” jobs. The distinction between “graduate” and “non-graduate” is also important for the various metrics that are produced from the destinations data.6 To evidence that a particular course or discipline supports graduate employability it is therefore important not only that graduates are able to find work, but also that they can find work of an appropriate level. A STEM degree should be a clear asset in achieving this aim of finding graduate level employment.