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dc.contributor.authorRylands, Lee
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Simon J.
dc.contributor.authorHurst, Howard Thomas
dc.contributor.authorBentley, Ian
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-20T10:58:16Z
dc.date.available2017-02-20T10:58:16Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-01
dc.identifier.citationRylands, L. et al (2016) 'Effect of cadence selection on peak power and time of power production in elite BMX riders: A laboratory based study', Journal of Sports Sciences, DOI: 10.1080/02640414.2016.1215491.en
dc.identifier.issn1466447X
dc.identifier.pmid27477519
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02640414.2016.1215491
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621427
dc.description.abstractThe aims of this study were to analyse the optimal cadence for peak power production and time to peak power in bicycle motocross (BMX) riders. Six male elite BMX riders volunteered for the study. Each rider completed 3 maximal sprints at a cadence of 80, 100, 120 and 140 revs · min(-1) on a laboratory Schoberer Rad Messtechnik (SRM) cycle ergometer in isokinetic mode. The riders' mean values for peak power and time of power production in all 3 tests were recorded. The BMX riders produced peak power (1105 ± 139 W) at 100 revs · min(-1) with lower peak power produced at 80 revs · min(-1) (1060 ± 69 W, (F(2,15) = 3.162; P = .266; η(2) = 0.960), 120 revs · min(-1) (1077 ± 141 W, (F(2,15) = 4.348; P = .203; η(2) = 0.970) and 140 revs · min(-1) (1046 ± 175 W, (F(2,15) = 12.350; P = 0.077; η(2) = 0.989). The shortest time to power production was attained at 120 revs · min(-1) in 2.5 ± 1.07 s. Whilst a cadence of 80 revs · min(-1) (3.5 ± 0.8 s, (F(2,15) = 2.667; P = .284; η(2) = 0.800) 100 revs · min(-1) (3.00 ± 1.13 s, (F(2,15) = 24.832; P = .039; η(2) = 0.974) and 140 revs · min(-1) (3.50 ± 0.88 s, (F(2,15) = 44.167; P = .006; η(2) = 0.967)) all recorded a longer time to peak power production. The results indicate that the optimal cadence for producing peak power output and reducing the time to peak power output are attained at comparatively low cadences for sprint cycling events. These findings could potentially inform strength and conditioning training to maximise dynamic force production and enable coaches to select optimal gear ratios.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02640414.2016.1215491en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of sports sciencesen
dc.subjectCyclingen
dc.subjectBicycle motocrossen
dc.subjectPoweren
dc.subjectCadenceen
dc.titleEffect of cadence selection on peak power and time of power production in elite BMX riders: A laboratory based study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentLiverpool John Moores Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Central Lancashireen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Sports Sciencesen
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-07-15
refterms.dateFOA2018-02-01T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractThe aims of this study were to analyse the optimal cadence for peak power production and time to peak power in bicycle motocross (BMX) riders. Six male elite BMX riders volunteered for the study. Each rider completed 3 maximal sprints at a cadence of 80, 100, 120 and 140 revs · min(-1) on a laboratory Schoberer Rad Messtechnik (SRM) cycle ergometer in isokinetic mode. The riders' mean values for peak power and time of power production in all 3 tests were recorded. The BMX riders produced peak power (1105 ± 139 W) at 100 revs · min(-1) with lower peak power produced at 80 revs · min(-1) (1060 ± 69 W, (F(2,15) = 3.162; P = .266; η(2) = 0.960), 120 revs · min(-1) (1077 ± 141 W, (F(2,15) = 4.348; P = .203; η(2) = 0.970) and 140 revs · min(-1) (1046 ± 175 W, (F(2,15) = 12.350; P = 0.077; η(2) = 0.989). The shortest time to power production was attained at 120 revs · min(-1) in 2.5 ± 1.07 s. Whilst a cadence of 80 revs · min(-1) (3.5 ± 0.8 s, (F(2,15) = 2.667; P = .284; η(2) = 0.800) 100 revs · min(-1) (3.00 ± 1.13 s, (F(2,15) = 24.832; P = .039; η(2) = 0.974) and 140 revs · min(-1) (3.50 ± 0.88 s, (F(2,15) = 44.167; P = .006; η(2) = 0.967)) all recorded a longer time to peak power production. The results indicate that the optimal cadence for producing peak power output and reducing the time to peak power output are attained at comparatively low cadences for sprint cycling events. These findings could potentially inform strength and conditioning training to maximise dynamic force production and enable coaches to select optimal gear ratios.


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