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dc.contributor.authorHenry, Philip M.
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-17T15:11:57Z
dc.date.available2017-02-17T15:11:57Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-12
dc.identifier.citationHenry P.M. (2016) 'An Assessment of the Prevent Strategy Within UK Counter Terrrorism and the Implications for Policy Makers, Communities and Law Enforcement', in Jegede, F., Todd, M., Hodgson, P., & Stubbs, J. (eds) Proceedings of International Conference on Diplomacy and International Relations (ICDIR-2016). Diplomacy and the Politics of Fear: The 21st Century Challenges to the Theory and Practice of Diplomacy and International Relations. 12 September. Derby: University of Derby, pp. 40-61en
dc.identifier.isbn9781910755075en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621416en
dc.description.abstractPrevent - the strategy - has become embedded in counter terrorism policy in the UK since 2007. It was reviewed and re-written in 2011 and has taken on even greater significance at the level of addressing questions of how to challenge and prevent 'radicalisation' in the context of managing security in the nation? This paper examines the tensions associated with the Prevent strategy and its legacy in the UK since 2007. It will explore the juxtaposition of policy making, which on one hand sees the means-ends solutions of avoiding further instances of terrorism at all costs, set against a potential community-based and local authority engagement model that foregrounds safeguarding against radicalisation and extremism in all its forms as a priority when working with communities across the country. There are apparent tensions in the emphasis of implementation and deliver of this strategy, which continue to challenge perceptions against the growing strengthening of fears associated with the erosion of civil liberties. The paper argues for a significant change in awareness of the behaviours and attitudes associated with 'radicalisation' and suggests policy could better reflect practice as we move through the second decade of the century.
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Derbyen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Derbyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.derby.ac.uk/newsevents/events/archive/events-archive/international-conference-on-diplomacy--international-relations.php;en
dc.subjectPreventen
dc.subjectTerrorismen
dc.subjectRadicalisationen
dc.subjectSafeguardingen
dc.subjectPolicyen
dc.subjectIdentityen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.titleAn assessment of the prevent strategy within UK counter terrrorism and the implications for policy makers, communities and law enforcementen
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T15:28:52Z
html.description.abstractPrevent - the strategy - has become embedded in counter terrorism policy in the UK since 2007. It was reviewed and re-written in 2011 and has taken on even greater significance at the level of addressing questions of how to challenge and prevent 'radicalisation' in the context of managing security in the nation? This paper examines the tensions associated with the Prevent strategy and its legacy in the UK since 2007. It will explore the juxtaposition of policy making, which on one hand sees the means-ends solutions of avoiding further instances of terrorism at all costs, set against a potential community-based and local authority engagement model that foregrounds safeguarding against radicalisation and extremism in all its forms as a priority when working with communities across the country. There are apparent tensions in the emphasis of implementation and deliver of this strategy, which continue to challenge perceptions against the growing strengthening of fears associated with the erosion of civil liberties. The paper argues for a significant change in awareness of the behaviours and attitudes associated with 'radicalisation' and suggests policy could better reflect practice as we move through the second decade of the century.


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