• Police strategies and suspect responses in real-life serious crime interviews

      Leahy-Harland, Samantha; Bull, Ray; Bournemouth University; University of Derby (Springer, 2016-09-13)
      This research focuses exclusively on real-life taped interviews with serious crime suspects and examines the strategies used and types of questions asked by police, and suspects’ responses to these. The information source was audio-tape-recorded interviews with 56 suspects. These recordings were obtained from 11 police services across England and Wales and were analysed using a specially designed coding frame. It was found that interviewers employed a range of strategies with presentation of evidence and challenge the most frequently observed. Closed questions were by far the most frequently used, and open questions, although less frequent, were found to occur more during the opening phases of the interviews. The frequency of ineffective question types (e.g. negative, repetitive, multiple) was low. A number of significant associations were observed between interviewer strategies and suspect responses. Rapport/empathy and open-type questions were associated with an increased likelihood of suspects admitting the offence whilst describing trauma, and negative questions were associated with a decreased likelihood.
    • Political discontent and the 21st Century's threats to global peace, security and human progress

      Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (College of Law, Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Derby, 2016)
      This paper examines 21st century relations between the State and the communities over which it, nominally at least, has jurisdiction. More specifically the aim of the paper is to explain both why and how so called mainstream politics is failing to engage with many peoples and communities around the world. To this end the paper identifies key areas of conflicts, tensions, mistrusts and other issues in both the domestic and international politics that could compromise the long term stability of nation states and threatens the peace, and security of peoples around the world. Cases are sited of hostile and un-diplomatic relations between states and ill-considered foreign policies that focus on narrow national interests rather than wider societal good. Based on the analysis presented, the paper concludes that the way politics is being played in the 21st century is a principal contributing factor to the current sense of despair and disconnection between the State and the governed. Tentative proposals are advanced towards forming a new politics which addresses the fear and concerns of other states, cultures and peoples as an integral part of any foreign policy and diplomatic relations.
    • The politics of migration in the UK from an artist's perspective - a conversation place No. 6, with a French artist Chris Dugrenier on migration and dance streamed live on May 5, 2015

      Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (Dance4, 2015)
      In this video, Dr Francis Jegede from the University of Derby and a Latin Dance enthusiast, explores the intersection of International Relations, Dance and Politics within the context of current debate and controversies surrounding the issue of migration in the UK. The video was produced by Dance4 under their Conversation Place project. A Conversation Place is a Dance4 project that brings together intriguing and provoking combinations of people who wouldn't normally meet face-to-face to shine a new light on the discourse that surrounds contemporary dance and choreographic practice. Project was set up with the hope that brief glimpses of the lives and ideas of Dance4 guest speakers and friends, shared online, can open up different perspectives on social issues and challenges facing society in Great Britain and beyond. Dance4 is an international centre for the development of extraordinary 21st century dance. A unique voice in the UK dance sector. Their work supports artists and practitioners who are interested in the development of dance as a tool for community development.
    • Population, resources and development

      Chrispin, Jane; Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (Collins Educational, 1996)
      Award-winning geography text covers the following themes: global wealth distribution, debt and aid; population structure, dynamics and migration; development strategies and population policies; industrialization and employment; and energy resources, commodities and trade. National Book Award - this book won the Geographical Association’s Silver Award - 1996.
    • Population, resources and development / 2nd. Ed.

      Chrispin, Jane; Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (Collins Educational, 2000)
      A completely revised edition of this popular A level text.This book covers: 1. Growth, wealth and happiness 2. Colonialism, dependency and aid 3. Population dynamics and structure 4. Population movements and urbanisation 5. Population policies and food supply 6. Human resources and industrialisation 7. Natural resources and development 8. World trade, commodities and communications 9. Regional development policies 10. Tourism as a development strategy 11. Alternative strategies for development
    • Pre-colonial legal system in Africa: an assessment of indigenous laws of Benin kingdom before 1897

      Ojo, Idahosa Osagie; Ekhator, Eghosa; University of Derby; University of Leeds (State University of New York, 2020)
      There were salient novelties in the legal system of the Benin Kingdom and other areas in pre-colonial Africa that promoted justice, peace, and order among people and communities. Special provisions such as collective responsibility in legal personality, the law of primogeniture, the fusion of laws and religion in theory and practice, and the recognition of societal status and political position in legal proceedings amongst other legal concepts were incorporated into the body of laws in Benin. Previous intellectual efforts center on the political, economic, and social aspects of history, largely neglecting these legal dynamics and other vital areas of the kingdom's organization. Hence, this study analyzes indigenous legal concepts in the Benin Kingdom using several varieties of primary and secondary sources. It contends that Benin, like other African societies, developed practical and useful legal concepts that helped in the consolidation of peace and harmony throughout its length and breadth, and that these indigenous Benin legal concepts were in force till 1897.
    • Presumed consent in organ donation: is the duty finally upon us?

      Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Bradford (2010)
    • Preventing crime and evoking altruism.

      Pease, Ken; University College London (Springer, 2014)
      The chapter describes the current movement towards the integration of a wider range of science disciplines in the understanding and prevention of crime. Circumstances have led to that integration being furthest advanced in collaborative research of crime scientists with mathematicians and geographers, among others. The sub-discipline of positive psychology, with its theoretical underpinnings in evolutionary theory, is identified as a promising partner in the burgeoning of crime science.
    • Preventing repeat and near repeat crime concentrations.

      Farrell, Graham; Pease, Ken; University of Leeds; University College London (Routledge, 2017-03-16)
    • Preventing repeat and near repeat crime concentrations.

      Farrell, Graham; Pease, Ken; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-03-16)
    • Privacy as personal resistance: exploring legal narratology and the need for a legal architecture for personal privacy rights

      Grace, Jamie; University of Derby (University of Idaho College of Law, 2011)
      Different cultures produce different privacies – both architecturally and legally speaking – as well as in their different legal architectures. The ‘Simms principle’ can be harnessed to produce semi-constitutional privacy protection through statute; building on the work already done in ‘bringing rights home’ through the Human Rights Act 1998. This article attempts to set out a notion of semi-entrenched legal rights, which will help to better portray the case for architectural, constitutional privacy, following an examination of the problems with a legal narrative for privacy rights as they currently exist. I will use parallel ideas from the works of W.B. Yeats and Costas Douzinas to explore and critique these assumptions and arguments. The ultimate object of this piece is an argument for the creation of a legal instrument, namely an Act of Parliament, in the United Kingdom; the purpose of which is to protect certain notions of personal privacy from politically-motivated erosion and intrusion.
    • Qualitative analysis of qualitative evaluation: an exploratory examination of investigative interviewers’ reflections on their performance

      Griffiths, Andy; Walsh, Dave; University of Derby; Department of Social Sciences, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Department of Social Sciences, University of Derby, Derby, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2017-10-12)
      Self-evaluation of interviews conducted by law enforcement professionals is a principal feature of a prescribed interview framework in England and Wales, underpinning their practice development. However, self-evaluation has been found in prior research to be neglected. Building on our recent study (which found that interviewers regularly over-rated themselves, when compared to our independent ratings), the same interviewers assessed their interview skills by way of completing an extensive reflective log. We found that those we regarded as skilled in our prior study tended to be more accurate in identifying their strengths and areas for improvement, while planning to correct such shortfalls in their future practice. On the other hand, those we had earlier rated as least skilled tended to be much less reflective, being both descriptive and inaccurate in their understanding of key interview tasks. They also remained inaccurate concerning their own interview skills, failing to be prospective in planning to improve their skills. As such, while reflective logs appear to be, for skilled interviewers, both a prompt for accurate self-assessment and a catalyst for planning further professional development, we also caution that such tools need further refinement to achieve the same goals for those either less reflective or less skilled.
    • Quintavalle: The quandry in bioethics

      Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Derby (Cleveland State University, 2016-12-31)
      The case of R. (Quintavalle) v. Human Fertilisation Embryology Authority (and Secretary of State for Health) presents a handful of legal problems. The biggest legal query to arise from the case is the inevitable harvest of babies, toddlers and very young children for their bone marrow. This article unpacks the judicial story behind Quintavalle to reveal how the strict provisions of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 - namely ‘suitable condition’ under schedule 2 paragraph 1(1)(a) and ‘treatment services’ and ‘assisting’ under section 2(1) - were widely misinterpreted to introduce the social selection of embryos into law. The legal loopholes created by the judgment (embryo wastage, welfare, eugenics and the legality of child harvest in particular) are also identified. It will be concluded that screening for a tissue match is social selection despite arguments to the contrary and that parents are not yet entitled in law to harvest a very young child for bone marrow, making the creation of a saviour sibling under the 1990 Act as a result of Quintavalle ultimately futile.
    • R v Hendy: intoxication and diminished responsibility

      Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Sunderland (2007)
    • RE: AB (termination of pregnancy)[2019] EWA CIV 1215: ‘wishes and feelings’ under the mental capacity act 2005

      Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Derby (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2020-06-15)
      In Re: AB (Termination of Pregnancy), the Court of Appeal was asked to consider an assumption made about the future living arrangements of a pregnant patient, and the weight to be ascribed to her wishes and feelings when she had no real understanding of her predicament. This commentary explores the importance of taking into account the perspective of the patient, even if suffering from a mental disorder, and it will analyse the existing common law to show that the weaker the ability of the patient to form her own wishes and feelings, the more appropriate it would be to rely on the remaining evidence.
    • Regional Economic Communities as the Building Blocs of the African Continental Free Trade Area Agreement

      Ajibo, Collins .C; Nwankwo, Chidebe .M; Ekhator, Eghosa; University of Nigeria; University of Derby (MARVIS BV, 2021-06-16)
      The African Continental Free Trade Area Agreement (AfCFTA) recognises the Regional Economic Communities (RECs) as the building blocs for continent-wide integration in line with the historical efforts reflected in the Lagos Action Plan of 1980 and the transitional plan of the African Union (AU) articulated in the 1991 Abuja Treaty establishing the African Economic Community (Abuja Treaty). The AfCFTA enjoins State Parties that are members of other RECs, which have attained among themselves higher levels of elimination of customs duties and trade barriers than those provided for under the Protocol, to continue maintaining this, and where possible improve upon, existing higher levels of trade liberalisation among themselves. While RECs are fundamental to the African integration experience and are considered the building blocs of AfCFTA, several challenges may emerge. This paper examines the prospects and challenges of RECs under the recently established AfCFTA regime.
    • The regulation of illegal fundraising in China

      Huang, Flora; Liu, Xinmin; Yeung, Horace; University of Essex (Taylor and Francis, 2018-10-03)
      The rise of financial technology means that it is easier than ever to raise funds from a large group of people, notably via peer-to-peer lending or crowdfunding platforms. This article seeks to discuss the law on illegal fundraising, which has existed for some time before the boom of the Internet, as a legal response to the increasing number of fundraising from the public. Regulation is necessary to ensure market order and investor protection. Virtually in all markets, there are restrictions on how entities can make a public offer of shares, bonds and/or other investment schemes. There are several laws, most notably criminal law, in China that are relevant to illegal fundraising. An individual/company can poten- tially breach one or more of these rules as long as they attempt to raise funds from a non-conventional (i.e. not stock markets or banks) route. The worst outcome of this used to be death penalty. There has been a degree of ambiguities in the application of these laws. The article will attempt to clarify these ambiguities. The regulation of illegal fundraising can have a far reaching conse- quence on the financial markets in China, considering that non- state entities, particularly small and medium-sized enterprises, have limited access to conventional finance. The article will con- sider whether China is on the right track in terms of regulation to allow alternative fundraising channels to thrive. This article is the first ever to present a holistic account of the regulation of illegal fundraising in China.
    • Repeat victimisation.

      Farrell, Graham; Pease, Ken; University of Leeds; Loughborough University (Routledge, 2016-11-01)