• Voles don't take taxis

      Pease, Ken; Loughborough University (Wiley, 2014-07-05)
      Johnson’s paper advances understanding of sequences of burglaries committed by thesame offender. Furthermore, it has heuristic value in suggesting new avenues for applicable research. Each of the current data shortcomings represents an opportunity for novel research approaches, and the optimum forager metaphor holds continuing appeal as an organizing principle helpful to operational policing.
    • Was Quashing the Maji-Maji Uprising Genocide? An Evaluation of Germany’s Conduct through the Lens of International Criminal Law

      Bachmann, Klaus; Kemp, Gerhard; SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities; University of Derby (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2021-07-30)
      Recently, political actors in Tanzania have demanded compensation from Germany for colonial atrocities against various ethnic and religious groups during the Maji-Maji uprising (1905–1907). By analyzing first-hand archival records from Germany and Tanzania, this article examines whether German actions constitute genocide according to the Genocide Convention or the International Criminal Tribunals’ jurisprudence. The authors find strong evidence to support a claim of genocide, and assess the viability of potential compensation claims against Germany; they conclude, however, that such claims would meet significant obstacles due to the concept of state immunity for sovereign actions under international customary law, as well as case law of the International Court of Justice.
    • What can we do to prevent a repeat of Paris in the UK?

      Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (Derby Telegraph, 2015)
      In the wake of the Paris terrorist attack, questions have been asked as to what we can d to prevent a repeat of this attack in the United Kingdom. This article offers some thoughts on this issue. The article recognises the enormity of the challenges facing the world's nations and society at large in the early 21st century as we witness the rise of violent extremism with groups such as Al Qaeda and Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) in the Middle East, the Boko Haram in West Africa and Al Shabaab in East Africa striking civilian targets indiscriminately and with a frightening degree of impunity. The paper argues for a rethink of our prevent strategies and suggests ways in which we could prevent similar attack in the UK.
    • What have criminologists done for us lately?

      Farrell, Graham; Pease, Ken; University College London (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014)
    • Whatever happened to repeat victimisation?

      Pease, Ken; Ignatans, Dainis; Batty, Lauren; University of Derby (Springer Link, 2018-10-04)
      Crime is concentrated at the individual level (hot dots) as well as at area level (hot spots). Research on repeat victimisation affords rich prevention opportunities but has been increasingly marginalised by policy makers and implementers despite repeat victims accounting for increasing proportions of total crime. The present paper seeks to trigger a resurgence of interest in research and initiatives based on the prevention of repeat victimisation.
    • Witnesses’ verbal evaluation of certainty and uncertainty during investigative interviews: Relationship with report accuracy

      Paulo, Rui; Bull, Ray; Albuqurque, Pedro; Derby University (Springer, 2019-06-07)
      The Enhanced Cognitive Interview (CI) is a widely studied method to gather informative and accurate testimonies. Nevertheless, witnesses still commit errors and it can be very valuable to determine which statements are more likely to be accurate or inaccurate. This study examined whether qualitative confidence judgments could be used to evaluate report accuracy in a time-saving manner. Forty-four participants watched a mock robbery video and were interviewed 48 h later with a revised CI. Participants’ recall was categorized as follows: (1) evaluated with very high confidence (certainties), (2) recalled with low-confidence utterances (uncertainties), or (3) recalled with no confidence markers (regular recall). Certainties were more accurate than uncertainties and regular recall. Uncertainties were less accurate than regular recall; thus, its exclusion raised participants’ report accuracy. Witnesses were capable of qualitatively distinguishing between highly reliable information, fairly reliable information, and less reliable information in a time-saving way. Such a distinction can be important for investigative professionals who do not know what happened during the crime and may want to estimate which information is more likely to be correct.
    • Women and access to environmental justice in Nigeria

      Ekhator, Eghosa; University of Derby (Institute for African Women in Law, 2020-10)
    • The wrong harvest: The law on saviour siblings

      Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2015-02-11)
      The momentous case of Quintavalle supported the creation of saviour siblings in English law. The House of Lords confirmed that embryos can be selected for social purposes according to the desires of the mother. This article discusses the implications of that decision for the welfare of saviour siblings and argues that harvesting of young saviour siblings is difficult to justify under the current fragmentary law.
    • Y v A Healthcare Trust and the Mental Capacity Act 2005: taking gamete retrieval to the bank

      Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Derby (Sweet & Maxwell, 2019-04)
      Comments on the application in Y v A Healthcare NHS Trust (CP) of the best interests test set out in the Mental Capacity Act 2005 s.4 to the retrieval of sperm from a man suspected of being brainstem dead, and the approach to consent to storage and use in fertility treatment by his wife. Questions whether a construction of best interests which extends to potential wishes is appropriate in the strictly regulated context of assisted conception.