• Taking crime seriously: Playing the weighting game

      Ignatans, Dainis; Pease, Ken; University of Derby (Oxford Academic, 2015-09-18)
      The advantages and problems of weighting crime counts by harm inflicted are detailed. To obtain a better understanding of crime trends and distributions, victim judgements of the seriousness of offences committed against them derived from the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) were analysed and used as weights of crime counts. The data were used to check whether there was a seriousness drop paralleling the crime drop of recent decades. There was, albeit somewhat less precipitous. Series crimes (i.e. repeated crimes against the same targets and presumed to be by the same perpetrators) account for an astonishing 39% of all crime and around 42% of crime weighted by seriousness. The article focuses on distributions across households. In line with our earlier work on crime events per se, the most victimized households have benefited most from the seriousness ‘drop’ in absolute terms, but still account for a similar proportion of total harm over time. A case is made for the use of CSEW victim seriousness judgement for a variety of analytic and practical purposes.
    • The “tech” of two cities: what Hong Kong failed but Shenzhen succeeded

      Huang, Flora; Yeung, Horace; University of Essex (Coller Capital, 2017-05-01)
      Shenzhen used to be a tiny town of around 30,000 people, north of the then prosperous British colony, Hong Kong, in southern China. The story is certainly entirely different now that Shenzhen is comparable to, if it has not already outshone its once proud neighbor. Shenzhen’s Nanshan district, home to a huge hi-tech industrial park, is now China’s richest, with a higher per capita GDP than even capitalist Hong Kong. This article will compare the two cities through the use of CIV city cases. It will discuss whether the institutional differences can help to explain the respective growth stories of the cities. Afterwards, the article will consider the prospects of the Qianhai Shenzhen-Hong Kong Modern Service Industry Cooperation Zone, a national-level initiative to combine the core strengths of the two cities in an attempt to boost the existing technology center to a new level before a conclusion is drawn.
    • Terrorism's footprint of fear

      Roach, Jason; Pease, Ken; Charlotte, Sanson; University of Derby; University of Derby (Routledge, 2016-08-24)
      Generally, when terms have extensive connotative baggage, it is wise to denude them. In the context of this paper, the only attribute we feel might be retained from the terrorism label is its implication that in such attacks, classes of people are deemed more or less equally ‘legitimate’ targets such that each citizen regards herself as a legitimate target. In the terrorist’s ideal scenario, insofar as it is thought through, the evocation of public fear of victimisation advances their cause. It leads to pressure on governments to settle or serves to destabilise the target administration by making daily life more problematic and by devoting resources to combatting terrorism’s threat that cannot be sustained indefinitely. The evolutionary context to this book leads us to consider anti-predator behaviour by prey animals alongside public fear of victimisation generated by acts of terrorism.
    • Text, cases and materials on medical law

      Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Derby (Pearson, 2015)
      Text, Cases and Materials on Medical Law combines detailed commentary and analysis of the law with excerpts from a range of sources, both legal and non-legal, to help set the law in context and deepen your knowledge of this contentious and highly emotive area of law.
    • The Information Governance Review and the new legal framework for informatics

      Grace, Jamie; University of Derby (Mark Allen Healthcare, 2013-07-30)
    • The legalities and politics of health informatics

      Grace, Jamie; University of Derby (Mark Allen Healthcare, 2011-03)
    • Towards a Deeper Understanding of 21st Century Global Terrorism

      Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology, 2016)
      This paper examines essential issues relating to the rise and nature of violent extremism involving non-state actors and groups in the early 21st century. The global trends in terrorism and violent extremism are examined in relation to Western governments' counter terror operations. The paper analyses the existing legal framework for fighting violent extremism and terrorism and highlights the inherent limitations of the current International Law of War in dealing with the growing challenges posed by terrorists and violent extremist groups. The paper discusses how terrorist groups use civilians, women and children as tools and weapon of war to fuel their campaign of terror and suggests ways in which the international community could deal with the challenge of fighting terrorist groups without putting civilians, women and children in harm way. The paper emphasises the need to uphold human rights values and respect for the law of war in our response to global terrorism. The paper poses the question as to whether the current legal framework for dealing with terrorist groups is sufficient without contravening the essential provisions and ethos of the International Law of War and Human Rights. While the paper explains how terrorist groups flagrantly disregard the rule of law and disrespect human rights in their campaign of terror, it also notes instances in which the current Western strategy in fighting terrorism may be viewed or considered as conflicting with human rights and international law.
    • Twenty-seven years of controversy: The perils of PGD

      Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Derby (BioCore, 2018-01-17)
      It has been 27 years since the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 was passed in the United Kingdom in response to advances in fertility treatment. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis - the screening of embryos for genetic diseases - has led to lengthy ethical debates on sex selection, eugenics, disabilities, saviour siblings, surplus embryos and most recently, adult-onset diseases (the BRCA cancer gene). This article provides an overview of how the law and practice of PGD in the United Kingdom and United States over the last quarter of a century has developed into new ‘branches’ of PGD, and predicts where they may be heading in the future. It concludes that many of the adverse views on PGD are unfounded and that some of these unique branches may develop to accommodate the screening of additional social traits. An underlying conflict between reproductive autonomy and a right to an open future is also rising under the surface to be noted for the future.
    • U.S. franchise regulation as a paradigm for the European Union

      Meiselles, Michala; Emerson, Robert; University of Derby; University of Florida (Washington University, 2021)
      The protection afforded to franchisees differs widely across the world. Nations with economically strong franchise sectors typically regulate the contract’s bargaining phase and post-formation. Sparked by the European Parliament’s call to review regulations governing Europe’s underperforming retail franchise sector, we propose reforms to counter the structural and economic inequality between franchise parties. Drawing on lessons from comparatively successful federal frameworks, we present a regulatory trifecta of mandatory disclosures to prospective franchisees, required express or implied contractual obligations and rights for both franchisors and franchisees, and compulsory adherence to certain protections of franchisees throughout the franchise relationship.
    • Using modeling to predict and prevent victimization.

      Pease, Ken; Tseloni, Andromachi; Loughborough University (Springer, 2014)
    • Voles don't take taxis

      Pease, Ken; Loughborough University (Wiley, 2014-07-05)
      Johnson’s paper advances understanding of sequences of burglaries committed by thesame offender. Furthermore, it has heuristic value in suggesting new avenues for applicable research. Each of the current data shortcomings represents an opportunity for novel research approaches, and the optimum forager metaphor holds continuing appeal as an organizing principle helpful to operational policing.
    • Was Quashing the Maji-Maji Uprising Genocide? An Evaluation of Germany’s Conduct through the Lens of International Criminal Law

      Bachmann, Klaus; Kemp, Gerhard; SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities; University of Derby (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2021-07-30)
      Recently, political actors in Tanzania have demanded compensation from Germany for colonial atrocities against various ethnic and religious groups during the Maji-Maji uprising (1905–1907). By analyzing first-hand archival records from Germany and Tanzania, this article examines whether German actions constitute genocide according to the Genocide Convention or the International Criminal Tribunals’ jurisprudence. The authors find strong evidence to support a claim of genocide, and assess the viability of potential compensation claims against Germany; they conclude, however, that such claims would meet significant obstacles due to the concept of state immunity for sovereign actions under international customary law, as well as case law of the International Court of Justice.
    • What can we do to prevent a repeat of Paris in the UK?

      Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (Derby Telegraph, 2015)
      In the wake of the Paris terrorist attack, questions have been asked as to what we can d to prevent a repeat of this attack in the United Kingdom. This article offers some thoughts on this issue. The article recognises the enormity of the challenges facing the world's nations and society at large in the early 21st century as we witness the rise of violent extremism with groups such as Al Qaeda and Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) in the Middle East, the Boko Haram in West Africa and Al Shabaab in East Africa striking civilian targets indiscriminately and with a frightening degree of impunity. The paper argues for a rethink of our prevent strategies and suggests ways in which we could prevent similar attack in the UK.
    • What have criminologists done for us lately?

      Farrell, Graham; Pease, Ken; University College London (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014)
    • Whatever happened to repeat victimisation?

      Pease, Ken; Ignatans, Dainis; Batty, Lauren; University of Derby (Springer Link, 2018-10-04)
      Crime is concentrated at the individual level (hot dots) as well as at area level (hot spots). Research on repeat victimisation affords rich prevention opportunities but has been increasingly marginalised by policy makers and implementers despite repeat victims accounting for increasing proportions of total crime. The present paper seeks to trigger a resurgence of interest in research and initiatives based on the prevention of repeat victimisation.
    • Witnesses’ verbal evaluation of certainty and uncertainty during investigative interviews: Relationship with report accuracy

      Paulo, Rui; Bull, Ray; Albuqurque, Pedro; Derby University (Springer, 2019-06-07)
      The Enhanced Cognitive Interview (CI) is a widely studied method to gather informative and accurate testimonies. Nevertheless, witnesses still commit errors and it can be very valuable to determine which statements are more likely to be accurate or inaccurate. This study examined whether qualitative confidence judgments could be used to evaluate report accuracy in a time-saving manner. Forty-four participants watched a mock robbery video and were interviewed 48 h later with a revised CI. Participants’ recall was categorized as follows: (1) evaluated with very high confidence (certainties), (2) recalled with low-confidence utterances (uncertainties), or (3) recalled with no confidence markers (regular recall). Certainties were more accurate than uncertainties and regular recall. Uncertainties were less accurate than regular recall; thus, its exclusion raised participants’ report accuracy. Witnesses were capable of qualitatively distinguishing between highly reliable information, fairly reliable information, and less reliable information in a time-saving way. Such a distinction can be important for investigative professionals who do not know what happened during the crime and may want to estimate which information is more likely to be correct.
    • Women and access to environmental justice in Nigeria

      Ekhator, Eghosa; University of Derby (Institute for African Women in Law, 2020-10)
    • The wrong harvest: The law on saviour siblings

      Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2015-02-11)
      The momentous case of Quintavalle supported the creation of saviour siblings in English law. The House of Lords confirmed that embryos can be selected for social purposes according to the desires of the mother. This article discusses the implications of that decision for the welfare of saviour siblings and argues that harvesting of young saviour siblings is difficult to justify under the current fragmentary law.