• Crime concentrations: Hot dots, hot spots and hot flushes.

      Ignatans, Dainis; Pease, Ken; University of Huddersfield; University College London (Oxford University Press, 2018-09-14)
      None
    • Distributive justice and the crime drop.

      Ignatans, Dainis; Pease, Ken; University of Kent; University College London (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)
      Data were extracted from a total of almost 600000 respondents from all sweeps of the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) 1982-2012 to determine whether victimisation was more or less concentrated across households during the crime drop. The most victimised household decile experienced the greatest absolute decline in victimisation but still accounted for over 70% of all victimisations suffered. Methodological issues underlying the patterns observed are discussed. The characteristics associated with highly victimised household are consistent across survey sweeps. Cross-national and crime type extension of work of the kind undertaken is advocated as both intrinsically important and likely to clarify the dynamics of the crime drop.
    • First-generation immigrant judgements of offence seriousness: evidence from the crime survey for England and Wales

      Los, Greg; Ignatans, Dainis; Pease, Ken; University of Kent; University of Huddersfield; University College London (Springer, 2017-03-17)
      This exploratory paper delves into differences and similarities in the rated seriousness of offences suffered by victims of different national origins. The issue is important because a mismatch between police and victim assessments of seriousness is likely to fuel discord. It was found that first-generation immigrants did not differ in their rating of the seriousness of offences against the person from either the indigenous population or according to region of birth. However, those of Asian origin rated vehicle and property crime they had suffered as more serious than did other groups about crimes they suffered. The anticipated higher seriousness rating of offences reported to the police was observed for all groups. People of Asian origin reported to the police a smaller proportion of offences they rated trivial than did people in other groups. Analysis of seriousness judgements in victimization surveys represents a much-underused resource for understanding the nexus between public perceptions and criminal justice responses.
    • Is it just a guessing game? The application of crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) to predict burglary.

      Monchuk, Leanne; Pease, Ken; Armitage, Rachel; University of Huddersfield; University College London; Applied Criminology & Policing Centre, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK; UCL Jill Dando Institute of Security and Crime Science, London, UK; Applied Criminology & Policing Centre, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2018-08-27)
      Crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) aims to reduce crime through the design of the built environment. Designing out crime officers (DOCOs) are responsible for the delivery of CPTED by assessing planning applications, identifying criminogenic design features and offering remedial advice. Twenty-eight experienced DOCOs from across England and Wales assessed the site plan for one residential development (which had been built a decade earlier) and identified crime risk locations. Predictions of likely locations were compared with 4 years’ police recorded crime data. DOCOs are, to varying extents, able to identify locations which experienced higher levels of crime and disorder. However, they varied widely in the number of locations in which they anticipated burglary would occur.
    • On whom does the burden of crime fall now? Changes over time in counts and concentration.

      Ignatans, Dainis; Pease, Ken; University of Huddersfield; University College London; University of Huddersfield, UK; University College London, UK (Sage, 2015-11-03)
      A recent publication (Ignatans and Pease, 2015) sought to examine the changed distribution of crime across households in England and Wales over a period encompassing that of the crime drop common to Western countries (1982–2012). It was found that while crime against the most victimised households declined most in absolute terms, the proportion of all crime accounted for by those most victimised increased somewhat. The characteristics associated with highly victimised households were found to be consistent across survey sweeps. The pattern suggested the continued relevance to crime reduction generally of prioritising repeat crimes against the same target. The present paper analyses the changed distribution of crime by offence type. Data were extracted from a total of almost 600,000 respondents from all sweeps of the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) 1982–2012 to determine which types of victimisation became more or less concentrated across households during the overall crime drop. Methodological issues underlying the patterns observed are discussed. Cross-national and crime type extension of work of the kind undertaken here are advocated as both intrinsically important and likely to clarify the dynamics of the crime drop.
    • Preventing crime and evoking altruism.

      Pease, Ken; University College London (Springer, 2014)
      The chapter describes the current movement towards the integration of a wider range of science disciplines in the understanding and prevention of crime. Circumstances have led to that integration being furthest advanced in collaborative research of crime scientists with mathematicians and geographers, among others. The sub-discipline of positive psychology, with its theoretical underpinnings in evolutionary theory, is identified as a promising partner in the burgeoning of crime science.
    • Preventing repeat and near repeat crime concentrations.

      Farrell, Graham; Pease, Ken; University of Leeds; University College London (Routledge, 2017-03-16)
    • Risk management in stalking victims: A multi-agency approach to victim advocacy

      Jerath, Kritika; Tompson, Lisa; Belur, Jyoti; University of Derby; University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand; University College London (SAGE Publications, 2020-12-15)
      A pilot Multi-Agency Stalking Intervention Programme (MASIP), introduced in three police forces in England, provided among a range of interventions, the delivery of safety planning advice, and needs-based support for stalking victims through a bespoke advocacy service. The ultimate aim of MASIP was to equip victims with tools to manage the variety of harms caused by stalking, as well as enable them to access the criminal justice system with adequate support. This study explores the personal needs of stalking victims from the perspectives of stalking victims, advocates and stakeholders involved in the intervention program, as part of a larger evaluation study conducted by the authors. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a total of 10 stalking victims who participated in the MASIP, three advocates who directly interacted with the victims, and 19 MASIP stakeholders involved in the project. Findings revealed that overall, victims believed the advocacy service aided their ability to cope with the realities of stalking. Having a victim advocate as single point of contact made victims’ journey through the justice system easier to navigate, provided them with the emotional support that they required to deal with the harms of stalking and the practical advice offered regarding their personal safety, and allowed them to feel in control of their own risk management. Advocates reported that the multi-agency context helped in risk assessment and ability to design and deliver bespoke support plans, which uniquely improved victims’ engagement with the service. Due to the small size and possibly biased sample, our conclusions must be interpreted with caution.
    • A situational approach to heritage crime prevention.

      Grove, Louise; Pease, Ken; University College London (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014)
    • What have criminologists done for us lately?

      Farrell, Graham; Pease, Ken; University College London (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014)