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dc.contributor.authorBrownhill, Simon
dc.contributor.authorOates, Ruby
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-16T13:58:58Zen
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-09T11:23:46Z
dc.date.available2017-02-09T11:23:46Z
dc.date.issued2016-03-24en
dc.identifier.citationOates, R. (2017) 'Who do you want me to be? An exploration of female and male perceptions of imposed gender roles in the early years' Education 3-13, 45(5), pp. 658-670en
dc.identifier.issn03004279en
dc.identifier.issn14757575en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/03004279.2016.1164215en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621366
dc.description.abstractThis paper provides an exploratory discussion surrounding the views and experiences of women and men who work/train in the early years (0-8 years) by bringing together select findings from two independent doctoral research projects. In an effort to weave together the voices of females and males working/training in the early years sector, this paper focuses its attention on the different ways in which their working roles are constructed and the possible ways in which this leads to the imposition of gender roles upon professionals in the 0-8 workforce in England.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03004279.2016.1164215en
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/bitstream/handle/1810/254545/Brownhill%20&%20Oates%202016%20Education%203-13.pdf?sequence=1
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Education 3-13en
dc.subjectEarly Yearsen
dc.subjectGender rolesen
dc.titleWho do you want me to be? An exploration of female and male perceptions of imposed gender roles in the early yearsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEducation 3-13en
html.description.abstractThis paper provides an exploratory discussion surrounding the views and experiences of women and men who work/train in the early years (0-8 years) by bringing together select findings from two independent doctoral research projects. In an effort to weave together the voices of females and males working/training in the early years sector, this paper focuses its attention on the different ways in which their working roles are constructed and the possible ways in which this leads to the imposition of gender roles upon professionals in the 0-8 workforce in England.


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