• Evaluating an interprofessional disease state and medication management review model

      Hoti, Kreshnik; Forman, Dawn; Hughes, Jeffery; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2013-11-18)
      There is lack of literature data reporting an incorporation of medication management reviews in students’ interprofessional education (IPE) and practice programs in aged care settings. This pilot study reports how an interprofessional disease state and medication management review program (DSMMR) was established in a residential aged care facility in Perth, Western Australia. Students from the professions of nursing, pharmacy and physiotherapy focused on a wellness check in the areas of cognition, falls and continence while integrating a medication management review. Students’ attitudes were explored using a pre- and post-placement questionnaire. Students indicated positive experience with the IPE DSMMR program which also resulted in their positive attitudinal shift towards IPE and practice. These findings indicated that aged care can be a suitable setting for student interprofessional programs focusing on DSMMR.
    • Evaluating social pedagogy training and development in Lincolnshire

      Moore, Nicki; Dodd, Vanessa; Sahar, Arif; University of Derby (2016)
      This report presents the findings and recommendations from an evaluation of social pedagogy training and implementation in residential homes in Lincolnshire. The social pedagogy training delivered by Jacaranda training in Spring 2015 was completed by 45 members of staff from three care homes in Lincolnshire
    • Evaluating the impact of career management skills module and internship programme within a university business school

      Taylor, Antony Richard; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (2014)
      This study evaluates the impact of an intervention on business school graduates’ employability comprising of a curriculum-based career management skills (CMS) module and an industrial placement year. The study uses data from the destinations of leavers of higher education survey to examine the employability of different groups within the cohort (no intervention, CMS module only and CMS module plus structured work experience). It finds that structured work experience has clear, positive effects on the ability of graduates to secure employment in ‘graduate level’ jobs within six months of graduation. Furthermore, participation in the CMS module also has a clear, positive effect upon the ability of participants to secure employment.
    • Evaluation of Careers Yorkshire and the Humber: inspiration activity and good practice guide.

      Artess, Jane; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2016-03)
      The evaluation captures the work of Careers Yorkshire and the Humber in their response to the government's 'inspiration agenda' which aims to support schools, colleges and prisons to inspire career aspiration in young people. Careers Yorkshire and the Humber is a regional provider of the National Careers Service.
    • Evaluation of the Chrysalis Summer School - 2008-2015

      Hooley, Tristram; Dodd, Vanessa; Sahar, Arif; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2016-07)
      This report presents a mixed-methods Evaluation of the Chrysalis Summer School’s impact drawing on evaluation data from 2008-2015.
    • Evaluation of the Legacy Careers Project

      Dodd, Vanessa; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2016-04)
    • Exploring teachers’ and pupils’ behaviour in online and face-to-face instrumental lessons

      King, Andrew; Prior, Helen; Waddington-Jones, Caroline; University of Hull (Taylor and Francis, 2019-01-21)
      The provision of instrumental lessons in certain areas of England can be hampered by the geographical position of some schools that are rural in nature, with teachers needing to travel long distances between schools. Internet-based technologies have been successfully used elsewhere to deliver instrumental lessons. A collaboration between the authors, North Yorkshire Music Action Zone and YouCanPlay allowed the delivery of instrumental lessons using Skype in combination with a Roland VR-3EX, an AV Mixer which offers 3 camera angles and good quality sound. Our aim was to repurpose existing technology to provide instrumental lessons in remote rural communities. The study was conducted in two-phases: a pilot study in North Yorkshire; and a further roll-out of the lessons in four additional areas (Cornwall; Cumbria; Durham/Darlington; and East Riding of Yorkshire). We wished to investigate the technical challenges and pedagogical aspects of the delivery, and also compare digitally-delivered and face-to-face instrumental lessons to explore the differences in behaviour. Data collected included pre- and post-project interviews with teachers, recordings of the teachers’ first and last lessons, and post-project questionnaires from pupils and their parents. Results suggested that there were technical challenges relating to sound, video and connection quality, and the physical environment of the lessons, some of which were alleviated by the Roland VR-3EX. Some concerns expressed by teachers in the initial interviews failed to materialise; others were overcome to some extent. Pupils concentrated well, were motivated to practice, and made good progress. Further analysis of the video data has allowed the comparison of face-to-face and digitally-delivered lessons. All teachers found the digital teaching more challenging than their usual face-to-face teaching; however, all reported that they would undertake similar teaching again. This paper focuses upon the exploring the behaviour of participants observed in the lessons. Digital delivery has the potential to provide greater access to instrumental lessons for children in rural communities.
    • Forsøk å be noen som ser stygge ut om å ta en ansiktsløfting

      Hooley, Tristram; Lillehammer University College (Utdanning.no, 2016)
    • Freedom of speech in a therapeutic age

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-05)
      Roy Harris (2009) and Adrian Pablé (2012) have argued that integrationists, in their philosophy and in their linguistics, have a Socratic approach to freedom of speech that sees vigorous and robust debate as the foundational freedom. Everything must be put to the test of criticism. Every citizen has a moral duty to defend freedom of speech and every academic has a duty to defend freedom of speech as the foundational freedom of the academy. Freedom of speech has historically been restricted and controlled at various times dependant on the contingent concept of human being at any time. Authoritarian attempts to control speech and antipathy to human freedom to assent or dissent from established opinion are familiar. In contemporary therapeutic culture restrictions on freedom of speech appear more kindly but are more authoritarian. Seeing human beings as diminished, vulnerable or mentally unwell provides the basis on which the state and its institutions can intervene and regulate freedom of speech and freedom to hear. Bans and censorship are now seen to be necessary to protect vulnerable individuals rather than to protect the cherished but untested ideas of the new moral elites. The kindliness of the new authoritarianism makes it harder to challenge without the challenger being seen as a victimiser. In the contemporary therapeutic university the right to assent alone is allowed. Even body language, sighs and ironic utterances are questionable. The therapeutic university is becoming the silent university. As the university is the embodiment of societal attitudes to freedom of speech what we are seeing is the creation of the silent student and future citizen who dares not speak; not for fear of being harmed but for fear of harming vulnerable others. References Harris, R. (2009) Freedom of Speech and Philosophy of Education, British Journal of Educational Studies, 57 (2) June 2009: 111-126. Pablé, A. M. (2012) Excommunicated on the grounds of Harrisy: Roy Harris, Linguistics and freedom of speech, in Ashley, LRN & Finke, W (Eds.). Language Under Controls: Policies and Practices Affecting Freedom of Speech: Selected Papers from the International Conference, September 23-24, 2011. East Rockaway, NY: Cummings & Hathaway: 1-12.
    • Friendship and peer cultures in childhood (Mexico).

      Fritz Macias, Heidi; Universidad Iberoamericana (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
    • Further education learners' prior experience of career education and guidance: A case study of Chesterfield College.

      Woolly, Amy; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (National Institute for Career Education and Counselling, 2015-10)
      This article explores further education (FE) students' prior experiences of careers education. The research draws on and extends the limited literature that exists around career support in further education. A mixed methods case study was used to explore students' experience of careers work prior to attending Chesterfield College and to examine the implications of this for the college's provision of career support. Findings indicate that the majority of students had limited contact with careers workers prior to their arrival at the college and, in instances when they had contact, often had a negative preconception of this contact. These findings are discussed with reference to the college's careers education provision and the wider implications for the sector.
    • Future First: Alumni in the Curriculum Evaluation 2015

      Artess, Jane; Hooley, Tristram; Shepherd, Claire; University of Derby (Future First, 2017-01)
    • The future of student success

      Walker, Ben; Manchester Metropolitan University (2019-03)
    • Gathering career wisdom from Facebook and other social media

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (CASCAID, Loughborough University, 2011)
      Tristram Hooley (Head of the International Centre for Guidance Studies – www.derby.ac.uk/icegs) discusses why careers professionals and their clients should be interested in social media.
    • Gender: Stories and Lies: debunking myth and determining reality

      Shelton, Fiona; University of Derby (Routledge, 2015)
    • Good looks and good practice: the attitudes of career practitioners to attractiveness and appearance

      Yates, Julia; Bagri, Kiren Kaur; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2016-10-20)
      Empirical evidence attests the impact that career image has on objective career success, yet little is known of how career practitioners conceptualise and operationalise this information. This article presents the quantitative findings of an online survey of career practitioners (n = 399, 74% female, 89% white and 75% from the U.K.) exploring their attitudes and practices towards issues of appearance and attractiveness. Career practitioners who participated in this survey acknowledged that beauty, self-presentation and interpersonal skills influence career success, and 96% of them considered conversations about career image as part of their professional remit. The career practitioners felt relatively comfortable and well informed in their discussions in this arena, but would welcome further guidance and training to inform their practice. Ethical and practical implications for the profession are considered.
    • Government, policy, and the role of the state in secondary education (Mexico).

      Aguilar-Nery, Jesús; Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
    • Graduate Careers in the Post-Brexit World

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (2016-07)
      Tristram Hooley, Professor of Career Education at the University of Derby, offers a prognosis on Brexit’s effect on the graduate labour market. He argues that careers guidance should play a role in bringing about more equality in the aftermath of Brexit and in empowering the generation of young people whose voices were not heard in the referendum.
    • The growing demand for education in Saudi Arabia: How effective is borrowing educational models from the west?

      Mirghani, Taiseer M.; University of Derby (Canadian Center of Science and Education, 2020-11-12)
      The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) considers education a top priority, and more emphasis has been placed on this following the 2016 announcement of Saudi Vision 2030. Since then, the country has witnessed several economic and social changes. As a result, the Kingdom has initiated a plan to invest in human capital through education to diversify its economy and increase employment. This includes educational reform with regard to primary and secondary education geared toward preparing students for higher education and the workplace. However, several factors may hinder the successful execution of this plan. This report will provide insights into factors such as cultural dimensions, learning profiles, the English language proficiency gap, and information on borrowing educational models from the West. It will also include some suggestions and recommendations to enhance teacher education programmes so that positive educational reform may be achieved effectively.