• Creating a coaching culture for managers in your organisation

      Forman, Dawn; Joyce, Mary; McMahon, Gladeana; Univeristy of Derby (Routledge, 2013)
      Creating a Coaching Culture for Managers in your Organisation is for managers leaders and coaches interested in extending the practice of coaching to achieve broader organisational outcomes. The book offers a practical approach on how to use coaching strategically to create a culture that supports change, builds leadership capacity, and achieves a high degree of alignment between the goals and aspirations of organisations, and their staff.
    • The critically reflective and creative practitioner

      Yates, Ellen; University of Derby (Routledge, 2020-06-07)
      This chapter aims to explain what critical reflection is and how it can be applied to empower students and enable them to question habitual practice and contest some of the dominant discourses within early childhood. The professions that utilise critical reflection are ones that deal with people, where relationships and ethical judgements are required but may not always be simple. In order to practise critical reflection as a professional, it may be necessary to reflect personally and individually, but is usually more useful and effective if this is practised with others. The chapter explains what critical reflection is, outlined some models and critical theory and explained how these can be applied to our professional lives and supports us in scrutinising our professional practice. It explores what critical reflection is and what it might mean for early childhood students. The author explores some critical theories and concepts that assist with critical reflection and help us deconstruct our experiences.
    • Cuba: educationaliImpact of the Cuban revolution

      Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Bloomsbury, 31/10/2019)
      Education in Mexico, Central America and the Latin Caribbean examines the development and practice of education in México, Costa Rica, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panamá. The chapters, written by local experts, provide an overview of the structure, aims and purposes of education in each of these ten countries with very different socio-economic backgrounds. The authors present curriculum standards, pedagogy, evaluation, accountability and delivery, discussing both how the formal systems are structured and how they actually function. The volume explores the origins of proposed reforms and their implementation, emphasising the distinctiveness of each country and attempting to locate new practices that could lead to better education.Including a comparative introduction to the issues facing education in the region as a whole and guides to available online datasets, this book is an essential reference for researchers, scholars, international agencies and policy-makers.
    • A culture of youth: young people, youth organisations and mass participation in Cuba 1959-62.

      Luke, Anne; University of Derby (Paradigm/ Routledge, 2014-06-30)
    • Curriculum renewal for interprofessional education in health

      Dunston, Roger; Forman, Dawn; Rogers, Gary; Thistlethwaite, Jill; Yassine, Tagrid; Hager, Jane; Manidis, Maria; Rossiter, Chris; Curtin University (Office for Learning and Teaching Australia, 2014-01)
      In this preface we comment on four matters that we think bode well for the future of interprofessional education in Australia. First, there is a growing articulation, nationally and globally, as to the importance of interprofessional education and its contribution to the development of interprofessional and collaborative health practices. These practices are increasingly recognised as central to delivering effective, efficient, safe and sustainable health services. Second, there is a rapidly growing interest and institutional engagement with interprofessional education as part of pre-registration health professional education. This has changed substantially in recent years. Whilst beyond the scope of our current studies, the need for similar developments in continuing professional development (CPD) for health professionals was a consistent topic in our stakeholder consultations. Third, we observe what might be termed a threshold effect occurring in the area of interprofessional education. Projects that address matters relating to IPE are now far more numerous, visible and discussed in terms of their aggregate outcomes. The impact of this momentum is visible across the higher education sector. Finally, we believe that effective collaboration is a critical mediating process through which the rich resources of disciplinary knowledge and capability are joined to add value to existing health service provision. We trust the conceptual and practical contributions and resources presented and discussed in this report contribute to these developments.
    • Curriculum renewal in interprofessional education in health: establishing leadership and capacity

      Forman, Dawn; Dunston, Roger; Thistlethwaite, Jill; Moran, Monica Catherine; Steketee, Carole; University of Derby (Office for Learning and Teaching Australia, 2016)
      The Curriculum Renewal for Interprofessional Education in Health: ‘Establishing Leadership and Capacity’ (ELC) project builds from a number of Australian and global studies and reports that address a range of critical issues associated with the development of interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional practice (IPP) within Australia and globally2.
    • The curriculum: Anyone can teach a dog to whistle

      Shelton, Fiona; University of Derby (Routledge, 2015)
    • Customer satisfaction with career guidance: a literature review

      Hooley, Tristram; Neary, Siobhan; Morris, Marian; Mackay, Susan; SQW; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (2016-03)
      This paper reports on the findings from a review of the literature relating to customer satisfaction with career guidance services. The review finds that reported levels of satisfaction with career guidance are typically high (ranging between 70-89%). However, it also reveals that there are challenges in measuring customer satisfaction in a consistent way and questions around the extent to which customer satisfaction correlates with other desirable outcomes of career guidance, such as career management skills and progression to further learning and work. The review sets out a model of factors that influence customer satisfaction which includes the individual and their expectations, the context in which the service is delivered, how the service is delivered and how the interaction is followed up. At present, there is little hard evidence suggesting a clear link between customer satisfaction and the other two outcomes that the National Careers Service is interested in (career management skills and progression).
    • The Dangerous Rise of Therapeutic Education

      Hayes, Dennis; Ecclestone, Kathryn; University of Derby; University of Sheffield (Routledge Education Classic Editions, 2019-02-07)
      The Dangerous Rise of Therapeutic Education confronts the silent ascendancy of a therapeutic ethos across the educational system and into the workplace. Controversial and compelling, Kathryn Ecclestone and Dennis Hayes’ classic text uses a wealth of examples across the education system, from primary schools to university and the workplace, to show how therapeutic education is turning children, young people and adults into anxious and self-preoccupied individuals rather than aspiring, optimistic and resilient learners who want to know everything about the world. Remaining extremely topical, the chapters illuminate the powerful effects of therapeutic education, including: How therapeutic learning is taking shape, now and in the future How therapeutic ideas from popular culture have come to govern social thought and policies How the fostering of dependence and compulsory participation in therapeutic activities that encourage the disclosing of emotions, can undermine parents’ and teachers’ confidence and authority How therapeutic forms of teacher training undermine faith in the pursuit of knowledge How political initiatives in emotional literacy, emotional wellbeing and ‘positive mental health’ propagate a diminished view of human potential throughout the education system and the workplace. The Dangerous Rise of Therapeutic Education is an eye-opening read for every teacher and leader across the field of education, and every parent and student, who is passionate about the power of knowledge to transform people’s lives. It is a call for a debate about the growing impact of therapeutic education and what it means for learning now and in the future.
    • Dealing with the ever changing policy landscape: Learning from international practice

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Career Development Association of New Zealand, 2016)
    • A defining moment in personal tutoring: reflections on personal tutoring definitions and their implications

      Walker, Ben; University of Lincoln (University of Lincoln, 2018)
      Despite personal tutoring being a highly important area, it has a contested nature. One contention concerns its definition: in simple terms, what personal tutoring is and, by extension, what effective personal tutoring is. A book on personal tutoring (Stork and Walker, 2015) I co-authored entitled Becoming an Outstanding Personal Tutor - which aims to define the role of the personal tutor in further education as well as explain and demonstrate how to carry out the role effectively) - raises a number of questions to be explored further. These have been brought into sharper focus by both my journey from further to higher education and as a result of my ‘practical’ role as a manager of personal tutoring. The most urgent of these questions are centred on the theme of definition. What alternative definitions are out there? Are single definitions sufficient for the complexity of tutoring? When it comes to personal tutoring, what constitutes a definition anyway? The urgency stems from the increased importance placed on personal tutoring resulting from contextual developments and as shown from the findings of key research reports on the retention and success of students. Similarly, if there is a broad consensus that personal tutoring is vital, then further debate around what it stands for, and should stand for, in terms of good practice, needs to take place. Informed by critical pedagogy, this article will consider these questions of definition and the potential implications for organisations, those undertaking the role and students.
    • Developing a new generation of careers leaders: An evaluation of the Teach First Careers and Employability Initiative

      Hooley, Tristram; Dodd, Vanessa; Shepherd, Claire; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2016)
    • Developing a new generation of careers leaders: Executive summary

      Hooley, Tristram; Dodd, Vanessa; Shepherd, Claire; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2016)
    • Developing an identity as an EdD leader: A reflexive narrative account.

      Tupling, Claire; Outhwaite, Deborah Emily; University of Derby; University of Warwick (Sage, 2017-11-22)
      This article considers the challenges encountered by a recently appointed assistant programme leader in establishing an identity as a leader of an EdD programme. In discussing literature on the development of the EdD, the article recognizes an existing concern with student identity but highlights a need to consider the development of the EdD leader’s identity as a leader. Employing a reflexive narrative, the article emphasizes the centrality of the leader’s disabled identity in considering the role of assistant programme leader and thus becoming a leader. The EdD is identified as a social space where colleagues are often engaged in their professional learning with the EdD leadership team providing support. This article tracks some of the commonplace behaviours around such learning in a post-1992 institution, and discusses the implications for EdD leadership and management teams when trying to consider and implement changes to established organizational cultures.
    • Developing creativity in early childhood studies students

      Yates, Ellen; Twigg, Emma (Elsevier, 2017-03)
      The study aimed to identify first year BA (Hons) Early Childhood Studies students' perceptions of and confidence in, their own creativity, in an East Midlands university in the United Kingdom and to inform the teaching of a first year Play and Creativity module at the same institution. The Play and Creativity Module makes use of the democratic definition of creativity (NACCCE, 1999) and Jeffrey and Woods (2003) concept of teaching for creativity by encouraging students to engage in practical activities to develop skills and confidence in their own capabilities. Though there is plenty of research which explores these ideas within the field of early childhood there is less research which focuses on best practice in Higher Education. The study identified a clear improvement in students confidence in their own creativity and their confidence to implement the activities experienced in the module sessions within their own practice. Students developed a deeper understanding of the concept of little creativity (Craft, 2002) and the democratic definition of creativity (NACCCE, 1999) and recognised the importance of providing a wide range of opportunities and resources for children to develop creativity. The practical activities within the module also supported students professional skills such as team working, listening to others and the importance of collaboration and reflection on practice. In addition, the practical and procedural elements of practice how to do with children was identified as being an area which was illuminated by completing the module and contributed to professional practice.
    • Developing creativity in early childhood studies students.

      Yates, Ellen; Twigg, Emma; University of Derby (2016)
      The study aimed to identify Early Childhood Studies students’ perceptions of, and confidence in, their own creativity, in an East Midlands university in England; and the influence of practical, creative activities on their practice with children. The study was qualitative in nature, framed within the interpretative paradigm and based on a first year Play and Creativity module which includes practical creative activity and the development of skills to enhance confidence. The key role of the practitioner in supporting children’s creativity has been highlighted (Craft 2002, Wright 2010) alongside the need for skills and confidence in practitioners. (Aubrey and Dahl 2013, Chien and Hui 2010) A study group of 25 was opportunity sampled from the full cohort of 90. Students completed questionnaires at the beginning and end of the module, alongside self- reflection sheets after five practical activities. Results were coded and analysed thematically. The study complied with the institution’s ethical procedures and participation was voluntary. Students were free to withdraw at any point. The results indicated improvement in students’ confidence in their own creativity and their ability to apply the skills developed within their practice. Students developed a wider understanding of the nature of creativity, including the importance of the environment, resources and opportunities for children to explore . The module supported students’ professional skills, including, team working, listening skills, collaboration and the importance of reflection on practice. The study concluded that practical activities within the module should continue to form part of the Early Childhood Studies Degree programme.
    • Developing ethical geography students? The impact and effectiveness of a tutorial-based approach

      Healey, Ruth L.; Ribchester, Chris; University of Chester (Informa UK Limited, 2016-02-17)
      This paper explores the effectiveness of a tutorial based approach in supporting the development of geography undergraduates’ ethical thinking. It was found that overall the intervention had a statistically significant impact on students’ ethical thinking scores as assessed using Clarkeburn et al.’s (2003) Meta-Ethical Questionnaire (MEQ). The initiative led to a convergence of scores, having a bigger impact on those who had a relatively low score prior to the intervention. Interestingly the approach had the biggest impact on students who self-identified as physical geographers. Unlike some previous research there was little evidence of difference between male and female students.
    • Developing your career: harnessing the power of the internet for “digital career management”

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Emerald, 2017)
      Purpose This paper aims to discuss the role of the internet in framing individual’s career building. It argues that the 7 Cs of digital career literacy offer a useful framework for those working in learning and development in organizations. Every individual needs to engage with the internet when thinking about how to manage and future-proof their careers. Learning and development (L&D) professionals can support employees to harness the power of the internet and learn how to make use of the new opportunities of “digital career management”. Design/methodology/approach This paper highlights steps that every individual needs to take for “digital career management” and pulls out the role of L&D professionals in addressing the developing internet context. Findings Sets out “7 C’s” for proactively managing a “digital career profile”. Originality/value The internet has shifted the context for career building and learning how to maximize the opportunities now offered is the central task for anyone wishing to carve out their future careers.
    • Documenting an educational imaginary – representations of schooling in British documentary films.

      Tupling, Claire; University of Derby (Либра Скорп (Libra Scorp), 2018-09-26)