• The student practitioner as future leader

      Yates, Ellen; Simmons, Helen; University of Derby (Routledge, 2020-06-07)
    • The student practitioner in Early Childhood studies: an essential guide to working with children

      Oates, Ruby; Hey, Christine (Routledge, 2014)
      The Student Practitioner in Early Childhood Studies: An essential guide to working with children provides accessible support and guidance for Early Childhood Studies students in higher education who may have little, if any, experience of relating to young children in the Early Years Foundation Stage and Key Stage One. With useful chapter summaries, activities and reflection points to help readers track their academic journey, this text draws on the experiences of students on the degree programme for the benefit of students new to practice. It will: - prepare students for the challenges of practice - provide a synthesis of academic knowledge and practice skills - develop students' critically reflective thinking and understanding relational pedagogy and the needs of young children - provide the emerging student practitioner in higher education with knowledge, skills, understanding and confidence to relate effectively with young children and adults in settings Fully supporting students' practice experience and development of their critical thinking, this helpful book synthesises theory and practice in an applied and critical manner. The authors cover a range of themes including critical reflection, relational pedagogy, confidence building, communication skills, personal and professional development and employability alongside academic writing and research skills. This textbook is essential reading for students on all Early Childhood degree programmes.
    • Student reflections on the place of creativity in Early Years practice: Reflections on second year work placement experience

      Twigg, Emma; Yates, Ellen; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-02-02)
      This research has investigated student’s reflections on the place of creativity in early years practice with an emphasis on their second year of placement. It has developed from previous research conducted with first year students on a BA (Hons) Early Childhood Studies degree at an East Midlands university in the United Kingdom. Within this research student reflections have been captured in order to assist them to consider their observations on the value placed on creativity and how this is interpreted within practice both within early years and education settings. The study identified that both creative teaching and teaching for creativity were seen within the settings the students attended. Limitations were highlighted in relation to the value placed on creativity within these settings and the recognition of the consequences this can have on children in being unable to express their individuality and uniqueness. Lastly the research sought to explore the impact of a first year module ‘Play and Creativity’ on students own creative abilities and their practice with children. Findings indicate that the module positively influenced students’ creative capabilities and also the promotion and encouragement of creative abilities in children
    • Surveillance of modern motherhood: Experiences of universal parenting courses

      Simmons, Helen; University of Derby (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020-08-23)
      This book explores the reflections and experiences of mothers of children aged 0-3 years that have attended universal parenting courses. Simmons considers the factors that motivated mothers to attend a universal parenting course and explore the wider experiences of early modern motherhood in the UK. She investigates participants' perceptions of benefits of attending a parenting course, different forms of parenting advice accessed by mothers, and how this provides an insight into the wider constructs and experiences of modern motherhood. Ultimately, the book considers, through a feminist post-structuralist lens, the social and cultural pressures within modern motherhood in relation to different levels of surveillance, and produces new knowledge for practice within the early years and health sectors in relation to the support currently offered to new mothers. It will be of interest to students and scholars across the sociology of education, gender studies, and childhood studies.
    • Surveying the religious and non-religious online

      Hooley, Tristram; Weller, Paul; University of Derby (Bloomsbury, 2015-12)
      This volume considers the implementation difficulties of researching religion online and reflects on the ethical dilemmas faced by sociologists of religion when using digital research methods. Bringing together established and emerging scholars, global case studies draw on the use of social media as a method for researching religious oppression, religion and identity in virtual worlds, digital communication within religious organisations, and young people's diverse expressions of faith online. Additionally, boxed tips are provided throughout the text to serve as reminders of tools that readers may use in their own research projects. - See more at: http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/digital-methodologies-in-the-sociology-of-religion-9781472571182/#sthash.p6wueWT2.dpuf
    • Symposium on online practice in counselling and guidance

      Goss, Stephen; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (2015)
    • Tackling the personal tutoring conundrum: A qualitative study on the impact of developmental support for tutors

      Walker, Ben; University of Lincoln (SAGE Publications, 2020-06-10)
      The significance of personal tutoring continues to increase as a result of contextual developments and the outcomes of key research on student retention and success, and yet these developments simultaneously create significant challenges in delivery within the pastoral model of personal tutoring. In addition, it remains an under-developed and under-researched area. Personal tutors’ needs and concerns have been established, and assessment of an intervention to address them has been recommended. This study examines the impact of the intervention of tailored professional development materials for tutoring within a pastoral model created in response to these issues. It reveals the usefulness of this developmental support and the need for such guidance for this work. It is argued that there are implications in terms of approaches to tutoring within this pastoral model, developmental support provision and a need for consistency of standards in personal tutoring across the sector.
    • Taught postgraduate employability and employer engagement: Masters with a purpose, Higher Education Careers Services Unit, Universities UK

      Artess, Jane; Ball, Charlie; Forbes, Peter; Hughes, Tristram; Higher Education Careers Services Unit (Universities UK, 2014-05)
      This report documents and explores higher education institutions' engagement with employers in respect of postgraduate taught Masters courses. Findings suggest that there might be better outcomes for graduates and employers where Masters study is approached in a 'purposeful' way.
    • Teacher education for SEND inclusion in an international context: The importance of critical theoretical work

      Robinson, Deborah; University of Derby (Routledge, 2021-12-31)
      Global commitments to inclusive education have been made in UNESCO’s Sustainable Development Goal, ‘Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for persons with disabilities’ (UNDESA, 2018. p75). With clear evidence that students with disabilities have heightened vulnerability to inequity, teacher education is considered an essential strategy for improving this situation. This chapter explores best practice in teacher education for SEND and inclusion and places emphasis on the importance of theoretical work in the teacher education curriculum. Best practices in teacher education must offer teachers opportunities to resist binary positions on the relevance of impairment to inclusive planning. It argues that critical theory in the form of critical disability studies provides useful theoretical tools, such as the explanation of ‘othering.’ These can make visible and ‘workable-on’, hidden barriers to inclusion including normative discourses. The chapter proposes two practical tools to support critical theorising on practice, reflexive practice, and transgression. Both support critical work on self and system. They also scaffold teacher agency in constructing hybrid forms of resistance/compliance in harmony with the freedoms and constraints operating in local and national sites for practice.
    • Teacher quality and effectiveness: Challenges and opportunities

      Shelton, Fiona; University of Derby (LIT Verlag, 2016)
      Effective teaching is defined by Coe, Aloisi, Higgins and Major (2014) as that which leads to improved student achievement using outcomes that matter to their future success. Whilst defining effective teaching is not easy, the research keeps coming back to this critical point; student progress is the yardstick by which teacher quality should be assessed. Well motivated, skilled teachers are at the heart of effective schools. Schools need to attend to the quality of teachers using a range of monitoring strategies. Teachers require access to opportunities for formal and informal professional development and understand the value of this for the schools objectives and the development of their own careers. The best teachers help young people to develop the capacity to reflect on and recognise their contribution to their world, its value and their developing spirit.
    • Teacher quality and effectiveness: Challenges and opportunities

      Shelton, Fiona; University of Derby (2016-05-27)
      Effective teaching is defined by Coe, Aloisi, Higgins and Major (2014) as that which leads to improved student achievement using outcomes that matter to their future success. Whilst defining effective teaching is not easy, the research keeps coming back to this critical point; student progress is the yardstick by which teacher quality should be assessed. Well motivated, skilled teachers are at the heart of effective schools. Schools need to attend to the quality of teachers using a range of monitoring strategies. Teachers require access to opportunities for formal and informal professional development and understand the value of this for the schools objectives and the development of their own careers. The best teachers help young people to develop the capacity to reflect on and recognise their contribution to their world, its value and their developing spirit.
    • Teaching in post-14 education & training (5th Edition)

      Hayes, Dennis; Armitage, Andy; Lawes, Shirley; Cogger, Alison; Evershed, Jane; Renwick, Mandy; University of Derby; Canterbury Christ Church University (Open University Press, 2016-01-01)
      Teaching in Post-14 Education & Training provides a skilfully balanced mix of essential theory and practical guidance to support you if you are studying an ‘education and training’ qualification. It covers fundamental background information such as key philosophies and concepts, current policy and practice, key thinkers and ideas, and includes a useful chronology. More importantly it also provides the tools to help you approach the classroom with confidence, covering fundamental issues such as teaching and learning, assessment, resources, and course design. Through its pedagogical features the book also offers you opportunities to pause and reflect, as well as practical exercises, templates and examples of student work. Key features of this new edition include:• Links to the latest Professional Standards for Teachers and Trainers• Updating of the legislative and policy context• Supporting learning with technology• Planning for equality and diversity• Embedding language and literacyThis is the definitive textbook on teaching, learning and assessment for those training to work in the post-14 sector."The latest edition of this popular book helps educators to reclaim their professional identity through stretching and thought-provoking commentary and critical questioning ... This is a valuable resource for students and teachers alike. It provides a useful framework for assignment and classroom work, balancing theory and practical teaching strategies."In Tuition, Issue 24/Summer 2016
    • The “Three Ps” (perfecting, professionalization, and pragmatism) and their limitations for understanding Cuban education in the 1970s

      Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Rowman & Littlefield, 24/08/2018)
      This book provides, for the first time, a comprehensive assessment of the 1970s which challenges prevailing interpretations. Drawing from multidisciplinary perspectives and exploring a range of areas--including politics, international relations, culture, education, and healthcare--its contributing authors demonstrate that the decade was a time of intense transformation which proved pivotal to the development of the Revolution. Indeed, many of the ideas, approaches, policies, and legislation developed and tested during the 1970s maintain a very visible legacy in contemporary Cuba. In highlighting the complexity of the 1970s, this volume ultimately aims to contribute to a greater understanding of the Cuban Revolution and how it chooses to face the challenges of the twenty-first century.
    • ‘They get a qualification at the end of it, I think’: incidental workplace learning and technical education in England

      Esmond, Bill; University of Derby; College of Education, University of Derby, Derby, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2017-10-20)
      Workplace learning is increasingly central to the international lifelong learning agenda but has made limited contributions to full-time vocational education in England during the last 30 years. A more central role is envisaged within the technical education proposed by the 2016 Sainsbury Review and Post-16 Skills Plan, with access to work placements dominating discussion of policy implementation. A multicase study of workplace learning among post-16 students in England on current ‘study programmes’ was mapped to four of the technical routes designated by the Sainsbury Review and Skills Plan, using documentary, observation and interview data. The study drew on theorisation of the workplace as the site of situated or incidental learning, whilst noting that its opportunities are differentially allocated according to organisational or personal differences, in ways that have particular implications for young people on placements. Whilst access to more advanced learning opportunities was secured through planned, collaborative approaches, reliance on incidental learning offered more routinised experiences to students less prepared for autonomous learning. The study indicates that questions of access, knowledge and pedagogy remain to be addressed if plans for ‘technical education’ in England are to provide meaningful learning opportunities and support transitions to fulfilling work.
    • 'They've got their backs to the sea': Careers Work in Kent's coastal schools

      Shepherd, Claire; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2016-02)
      Kent's coastal schools are a highly diverse group of institutions which serve a range of different communities. In a literal sense the young people of Kent have got their backs to the sea. Despite their relative proximity to the economic heartland of England, they remain separated by distance and geography. Many of the challenging issues that have been identified for young people in coastal towns are strongly related to their careers. Career describes the individual’s progression through life, learning and work. Individual’s careers are profoundly influenced by the context within which they pursue them. But, context does not wholly define your career. With the right information, support and education people can make the most out of their circumstances, seize the opportunities around them and change, improve or leave their immediate environment. Career guidance describes a range of educational interventions that are designed to help people to realise their potential and make the most of their career.
    • Towards being a "Good Cuban": socialist citizenship education in a globalized context.

      Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Springer, 21/10/2016)
      Considering the renewed diplomatic relations with the United States and to a globalized world, the Cuban State is forming global citizens while trying to retain socialist values in the face of increased market liberalization. Since the revolutionary period (1960s), Cuban education has stressed the intersecting values of fervent, resistant patriotism, hard work and active, solidary internationalism, as integral parts of the New Socialist Man/Woman or the “buen revolucionario” (good revolutionary). In this new economic, political and social context the Cuban government, its school system, and parents are challenged with preserving socialism and its accompanying values while preparing its young people for work and life in an evolving society and globalized world. Drawing on school textbooks and a wide range of interviews with young Cubans conducted by three education researchers, between 2011 and 2014, this chapter examines Cuban young people’s struggle to reconcile the contradictions and tensions between these ideals and the pragmatic reality of life, implying the need for new forms of national, international, global citizenship. Cuban youth are demanding a larger role in shaping their society if the government wants to keep them on the island. Consequently, the development of the buen revolucionario is taking on new meaning in the twenty-first century globalized world.
    • La tradición de la organización comunitaria y la participación social en un preescolar de la Ciudad de México

      Delgado-Fuentes, Marco Antonio; González Peral, Adriana; Universidad Iberoamericana, Ciudad de México (El Colegio de SonoraJuan Pablo Editor, 2015)
    • Training Needs Analysis

      Moore, Nicki; Osmani, Argjend; Teched Consulting Services, Ltd.; University of Derby (European Union Office in Kosovo, 2015)
      The training needs analysis was conducted beteeen February and April 2015 for the EU funded project: ICT in Education in Kosovo. The processes required to perform the traning needs analysis have been.  The design of a framework of competences;  The identification of target groups;  The creation and implementation of an online survey to assess the competence of education sector personnel against the competences contained in the framework;  The collation, preparation and analysis of the survey data; and  Reporting the research findings.
    • La transición del preescolar a la primaria ¿Cómo aprenden los niños a leer el contexto escolar?

      Delgado-Fuentes, Marco Antonio; Universidad Iberoamericana, Ciudad de México (Universidad Iberoamericana, Ciudad de México, 2017)