• Measure learner performance on a scale of 1 to 10

      Walker, Ben; Stalk, Andrew; University of Lincoln (2015)
    • The mental health needs of refugee pupils.

      Hewitt, Shirley; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-08-23)
    • Migration and mobility in childhood (Mexico).

      Mancillas Bazan, Celia; Figueroa Diaz, Maria Elena; Universidad Iberoamericana (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
    • More morphostasis than morphogenesis? The ‘dual professionalism’ of English Further Education workshop tutors

      Esmond, Bill; Wood, Hayley; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2017-03-27)
      An international repositioning of vocational teachers in relation to knowledge and the workplace is reflected in English Further Education through the terminology of ‘dual professionalism’. Particularly in settings most closely linked to specific occupations, this discourse privileges occupational expertise that vocational educators bring from their former employment alongside pedagogic expectations of the teaching role. In a qualitative study of recently qualified teachers employed substantially in workshop settings, using the analytical framework of Margaret Archer, workplace skills and generic attributes provided a basis for claims to expertise, extending to a custodianship of former occupations. Further augmentation of educator roles, however, appeared constrained by market approaches to development and employment insecurity in the sector and beyond. In Archer’s terms, the current environment appears to cast ‘dual professionalism’ as morphostasis, drawing on former practice at the expense of teacher identity in the face of insecurity. Morphogenesis into enhanced professional teacher identities, for example, developing coherent vocational pedagogies informed by research into advances in knowledge, appears the less likely outcome in the current and emerging sector.
    • NAHT Aspire Pilot Evaluation (Executive Summary)

      Neary, Siobhan; Dodd, Vanessa; Radford, Neil; Institute of Education (2016-01)
      The NAHT Aspire Partner Schools programme is based on a multi-strand approach to school improvement. It utilises a five strand design focusing on, leadership, assessment for learning, learning environment, pedagogy and curriculum, and student and family support. This is delivered within clusters groups, underpinned by distributed leadership and supported by external advisers. The model is aligned with current international research on school improvement and effectiveness. It aims to support schools to progress from a Requires Improvement Ofsted assessment to a Good grading within three years. This evaluation reports on the implementation and the impact of NAHT Aspire at just over the two-year point in the programme (six of the nine term cycles of activity). Participants believe that it has improved their school, has empowered teaching staff and built leadership capacity. In addition, it is cost effective and has provided value for money when compared with the costs of forced academisation.
    • ‘The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few’ Support for children with SEND in times of austerity

      Bloor, Andy; university of derby (Routledge, 2020-10-20)
      This chapter considers some of the moral and theoretical perspectives around the debate surrounding the allocation of resources in schools in recent times. It examines if there are any moral imperatives around the debates on how we fund education for all children, but particularly those with a Special Educational Need and Disability (SEND). The author explores what responses we can and should make when faced with difficult choices around funding and what current theory and argument can do to support us in making considered, proactive, positive and empowering choices.
    • New strategy to transform the quality of careers education, advice and guidance for young people

      Andrews, David; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2016)
      This paper, based on David's experience of having been directly involved in careers work for young people over 35 years, offers some personal suggestions about what should be included in the forthcoming strategy for careers education and guidance. The aim of this strategy should be to ensure that the careers support that young people experience provides them with the help that they need to progress successfully through learning and into work. It should prepare them for lives and careers where they will have to navigate a complex and challenging landscape of education, training and employment.
    • Now we don’t see the university as something distant. It’s here in our hands’: situated pedagogy in Cuban municipal universities

      Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Institute for Education Policy Studies, 04/2019)
      The first years of the twenty-first century saw the introduction of a new mode of higher education in Cuba. Local university centres were set up across the country offering part time study to a range of students previously marginalised from higher education. As well as massively increasing access, this programme created a new kind of teacher – local professionals teaching part-time alongside their regular employment. Using the personal testimony of students and teachers in rural Granma, this paper examines the role of these teachers, with a particular emphasis on the value of their capacity to offer a pedagogy situated in the workplaces, communities and daily lives of their students.
    • Only qualifications count: Exploring perceptions of continuing professional development (CPD) within the career guidance sector.

      Neary, Siobhan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS); University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2016-05-03)
      This paper explores the views of a group of career development practitioners undertaking a postgraduate qualification as a form of continuing professional development (CPD). It offers insights into how these practitioners perceive and view different forms of CPD. A case study methodology was adopted to gather examples of CPD activities practitioners engaged in and the value placed on these in supporting the development of professional practice. Their views were synthesised to create a typology representing a differentiated model of CPD. The model proposes three types of CPD: operational, experiential and formal. Formal CPD is perceived as having the highest value in developing professional practice. The study supports a deeper understanding of how careers practitioners engage with and understand CPD.
    • Our teachers: Collected memories of primary education in Derbyshire schools from 1944 - 2009

      Shelton, Fiona; University of Derby (InScience Press, 2019-05-01)
      This paper presents findings from narrative interviews undertaken with 24 narrators who attended primary school in the decades from 1944 - 2009. Deductive themes were first selected by examining the quantity of content and relevance to the study. Four deductive themes were drawn from the narrators’ recollections: Our Teachers; The Lessons We Learned; Our Friendships and the Games We Played and finally The Books we Read. The focus of this paper is on the findings from one of the deductive themes: Our Teachers. Once the stories had been transcribed, they were analysed for inductive themes. These were identified as: Pupil-teacher relationship, noted across each of the decades. A gendered workforce, reflected in each decade, except 1999-2009. Teacher personality was common across all decades. Corporal punishment was common in the decades from 1944-1987, but not present after 1987. Finally, Teacher professionalism was a prevalent theme in most decades except 1999-2009. Key findings related to the connections that come with the relationship the teacher forms with their pupils. Teachers who break the mould are well remembered by pupils. The nature of the primary school workforce has changed since 1944, and is now perceived as being female dominated. Because of changes to legislation, the role of the teacher has evolved, the changes in professional behaviour are noted in the narrators’ stories, from decade to decade.
    • Overview of childhood (Mexico).

      Delgado-Fuentes, Marco Antonio; University of Derby (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
    • Overview of early childhood education (Mexico)

      Delgado-Fuentes, Marco; University of Derby (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2020-10-26)
      This article is part of the Bloomsbury Education and Childhood Studies online resource. It discusses the current educational system in the country for children under six, in the levels of Initial Education and Preschool Education. It includes issues on age range, the role of government in ECE, key providers, programs and services, staff and current challenges.
    • Part-time higher education in English colleges: Adult identities in diminishing spaces

      Esmond, Bill; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2016-01-21)
      Adult participation in higher education has frequently entailed mature students studying part time in lower-ranked institutions. In England, higher education policies have increasingly emphasised higher education provision in vocational further education colleges, settings which have extensive adult traditions but which mainly teach employment-based skills and are widely regarded as ‘outside’ higher education. This paper interrogates the significance of these dimensions of college higher education, through a qualitative study of identity formation by adult part-time students. Their accounts, developed through individual interviews and focus groups, emphasised the significance of work to their interpretations of higher education participation: these are compared here to a range of conceptualisations of identity that have been applied in relation to work organisations. This analysis indicates some of the ways in which pathways which adults may interpret as meaningful in terms of work-related identities may correspondingly be constrained by a narrow discourse of work-based skills and credentials.
    • Pedagogies for developing undergraduate ethical thinking within geography

      Healy, Ruth. L; Ribchester, Chris; University of Derby (Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019-12-05)
      Ethical issues are an example of ‘supercomplexity’, whereby ‘the very frameworks by which we orientate ourselves to the world are themselves contested’ (Barnett 2000, p. 257). Reflecting on ethical issues develops practical, critical thinking skills for dealing with such ‘supercomplexity’, as the frameworks students use to analyse ethical issues may be challenged and are likely to change over time. Yet, despite the wide-ranging potential, teaching ethics is often marginalized and segregated in the geographical curriculum, with ethics frequently being limited to prescriptive research considerations. This chapter offers a holistic approach to how ethical thinking might be embedded within geography programmes through a set of key principles related to: 1) recognizing; 2) reviewing; and 3) responding to ethical issues. This framework enables tutors to work with students to address ethical thinking and problems both inside and outside the curriculum, as well as to prepare students for their futures, including in the graduate-level workplace. It is suggested that encouraging students to reflect on ‘everyday’ ethical problems may sometimes act as a helpful first step prior to addressing ethical challenges within the content and practice of the discipline.
    • Personal tutoring – boundaries in student support and success

      Walker, Ben; Manchester Metropolitan University (2018-10)
    • Play

      Yates, Ellen; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-02-16)
    • Positioning children as artists through a ceramic arts project and exhibition: children meaning making

      Yates, Ellen; Szenasi, Judith; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2021-03-15)
      This article describes a ceramic arts research project that provided children with opportunities for meaning making using bone china clay, a medium with strong cultural and historical links to the city where the research took place. The children were positioned as artists and their work was curated and presented for exhibition by an international ceramic artist, affording equal status to their work as that of adults. Findings identified that children made meaning based on lived experiences, popular culture, unique family and cultural heritage, and school identities. We also acknowledge that adult attitudes and school schedules can both enable and limit children’s creativity. We further assert that the professional exhibition validated children’s processes, competence, cultural funds of knowledge and agency.
    • Professional standards and recognition for UK personal tutoring and advising

      Walker, Ben; Manchester Metropolitan University; University of Derby (Frontiers Media SA, 2020-10-14)
      The Higher Education and Research Act established both a regulatory framework and the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) with associated metrics for student retention, progression and employability in the United Kingdom. As a key site in meeting these requirements, the significance of personal tutoring is clear. Despite this, according to existing institutional research, there is a need for developmental support, greater clarification on the requisite competencies, and adequate recognition for those undertaking this challenging role. Moreover, arguably compounding these concerns is the lack of distinct professional standards for personal tutoring and advising against which to measure effective practice, only recently addressed by the publication of The UKAT Professional Framework for Advising and Tutoring. Through a review of the literature supported by findings from a survey of practitioners, this paper discusses the need for such standards, and the skills and competencies populating them. Additionally, the usefulness of pre-existing standards pertinent to tutoring work (such as the United Kingdom Professional Standards Framework for Teaching and Supporting LearninginHE)areevaluatedandthevalueandrecognitionwithwhichpersonaltutoring standards could be associated are advanced. The survey supported the need for specificstandards–representedbytheUKATframework–asevidentfromtheliterature. Justificationsprovidedforboththisandtheopposingviewareexamined.Clarityforboth individual practitioners and institutions was stipulated along with meaningful recognition and reward for this work which is considered highly important and yet ‘invisible.’ The participants and literature reviewed identify relevant content along with illuminating the debate about the relationships between personal tutoring, teaching and professional advising roles. Valuable analysis of standards, recognition and reward also emerged. This is considered by discussing the connection between standards and changes to practice, responses to policy developments and the purpose of ‘standards’ in comparison to ‘guidance.’ The paper proposes that the recent introduction and use of a bespoke framework is a necessary response to alleviate some of the current tensions which beset personal tutoring and advising in higher education.