• The uncertain story of career development

      Bright, Jim; International Centre for Guidance Studies (International Centre for Guidance Studies, College of Education, University of Derby, 2016)
      In this paper, the central role of uncertainty in career development and its implications for counselling, coaching and education practice as well as policy will be explored. It is argued that although uncertainty was recognised in the earliest formulations of career counselling models, it was subsequently largely ignored or deemed unimportant in nearly all of the dominant theories of career development for the remainder of the 20th century. More recently theorists have begun to acknowledge once more the central importance of uncertainty in career development, and more broadly in areas as diverse as science and politics. The reasons and importance of this renewed focus is explored with particular emphasis on chaos and complexity theories. The Chaos Theory of Careers (CTC) (Pryor & Bright, 2011) will be presented as theory that provides a powerful way of understanding the relationship between order and chaos, pattern and surprise as composites not opposites. Accepting that uncertainty is an inevitable, inescapable and ubiquitous part of life leads to new approaches to career development practice, theory and policy.
    • Understanding career management skills: findings from the first phase of the CMS LEADER project

      Neary, Siobhan; Dodd, Vanessa; Hooley, Tristram; International Centre for Guidance Studies (2016)
    • Understanding employers' graduate recruitment and selection practices. BIS Research Paper 231.

      Pollard, Emma; Hirsh, Wendy; Williams, Matthew; Buzzeo. Jonathan; Marvell, Rosa; Tassinari, Arianna; Bertram, Christine; Fletcher, Luke; Artess, Jane; Redman, Jennifer; et al. (Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, 2015)
      This research examined the approach to graduate recruitment adopted by employers and how this has evolved in recent years. In particular the study aimed to explore patterns in graduate recruitment, behaviours of graduate employers and interactions between graduate employers and universities. It therefore provides a picture of long-term trends in practice from pre-recruitment activities through to entry, induction and beyond, and before, during and after the recession; and indicates the ways in which employers’ thinking about recruitment and selection have, and are, changing and developing. The research was driven by a need to update the evidence and understanding of recruitment practice as the population of graduates has increased dramatically and become more heterogeneous; the labour market has changed, emerging from difficult economic conditions; and there is increasing policy interest in diversity and particularly in social mobility.
    • Understanding the careers cold spots.

      Boys, Jonathan; Hooley, Tristram; Barbone, Lucia; Hedges, Sophie; Spekesser, Stefan; The Careers & Enterprise Company (The Careers & Enterprise Company, 2016)
      This paper sets out our cold spots analysis which provides us with some important insights about how opportunities are organised in England. In the report we examine which areas have: high levels of engagement between schools and employers; young people who are making opportunity informed decisions and achieving positive outcomes in terms of education and employment. We also examine the areas in which young people are most likely to experience substantial barriers. This analysis allows The Careers & Enterprise Company to understand where more career support is needed and to direct our resources towards these areas. We hope that it this analysis will also guide the activities of others working in this space.
    • Understanding the part-time researcher experience

      Hooley, Tristram; Kulej, Malgorzata; Edwards, Carol; Mahoney, Kate; Vitae (CRAC, 2009)
    • Understanding what makes a positive school experience for pupils with SEND: Can their voices inform inclusive practice?

      Dimitrellou, Eleni; Male, Dawn; University of Derby; UCL Institute of Education (Wiley, 2019-04-25)
      Since the advent of the ideology of inclusion, several concerns have been raised worldwide regarding the effectiveness of its implementation. In the UK, governmental evidence suggests that maintaining pupils with special educational needs and/or disability (SEND) within mainstream school settings, is one of the greatest challenges (DfE, 2018). There is now, more than ever, the need to explore pupils with SENDs’ mainstream experiences and understand the challenges they encounter. This study explores the voices of secondary‐aged pupils with social emotional mental health difficulties and moderate learning difficulties as a way of understanding their needs and thus, facilitating their inclusion. Thematic analysis was employed to analyse data from semi‐structured interviews with 43 pupils with SEND and 8 typical pupils as a comparable group. The findings indicate that the school experiences of pupils differ based on their type of need. Yet, despite the differences, all the pupils expressed similar views on what makes a positive school experience. The four emerged themes were interesting lessons, effective control of challenging behaviour, equal allocation of teachers’ support and positive relations. The study concludes by proposing that listening to the voices of pupils with SEND can be a powerful tool to inform inclusive practice.
    • The uses of a chronology: a guide for students

      Hayes, Dennis; Browne, Liz; University of Derby; Oxford Brookes University (University of Derby, 2017-06-14)
      Whatever topic or issue you wish to study there is only one way of starting – with a chronology. Once you draw up a chronology and reflect upon it, that mental block you may have will vanish. Simply look for differences and changes rather than similarities. When you have done this writing that essay, independent study, dissertation or thesis will be interesting and exciting. You will have something interesting to say. This paper makes more widely available a piece of research undertaken by Professor Dennis Hayes, Professor Liz Browne (a professor at Oxford Brookes University and a Visiting Professor at the University of Derby) and colleagues. It provides an introduction and rationale for using chronologies as well as several examples that illustrate how they illuminate subjects for students to consider. The original research began with a cheeky question. There are many bestselling textbooks but do the students who buy them actually use them? Authors may not be troubled by this as the royalties still come in but there is more to writing than a cash nexus. The textbook that we used is now in its fifth edition - Armitage, A., Cogger, A., Evershed, J., Hayes, D., Lawes, S. and Renwick, M. (2016) Teaching in Post-14 Education & Training, Maidenhead: Open University Press. If you are studying or working in Post-14 education we recommend that you read Chapter 9 ‘Developments in Post-14 Education and Training’ which brings the chronology up-to-date. But all students will find this guide useful whatever their particular subject specialism.
    • Using a research-informed interprofessional curriculum framework to guide reflection and future planning of interprofessional education in a multi-site context

      Moran, Monica Catherine; Steketee, Carole; Forman, Dawn; Dunston, Roger; University of Curtin (Canadian Institute for Studies in Publishing Press, 2015-03)
      Background: Over the past two years health educators in Australia have benefited from funding made available from national organizations such as the Office of Learning and Teaching (OLT) and Health Workforce Australia (HWA). Funded research has been conducted into educational activities across the country that aim to promote integrated and sustainable interprofessional learning. Methods and Findings: A collaboration between multiple stakeholders led to the establishment of a consortium of nine universities and interprofessional organizations. This collaboration resulted in a series of research studies and the development of a conceptual framework to guide the planning and review of interprofessional health curricula. A case study of the development of a suite of health education programs at a regional university in Australia is used to demonstrate how the framework can be used to guide curricular reflection and to plan for the future. Shedding a light on interprofessional health education activities across multiple sites provides a rich picture of current practices and future trends. Commonalities, gaps, and challenges become much more obvious and allow for the development of shared opportunities and solutions. Conclusions: The production of a shared conceptual framework to facilitate interprofessional curriculum development provides valuable strategies for curricular reflection, review, and forward planning.
    • Using a research-informed interprofessional curriculum framework to guide reflection and future planning of Interprofessional Education in a Multi-site Context

      Moran, Monica Catherine; Steketee, Carole; Forman, Dawn; Dunston, Roger; University of Derby (2015-03)
      Abstract Background: Over the past two years health educators in Australia have benefited from funding made available from national organizations such as the Office of Learning and Teaching (OLT) and Health Workforce Australia (HWA). Funded research has been conducted into educational activities across the country that aim to promote integrated and sustainable interprofessional learning. Methods and Findings: A collaboration between multiple stakeholders led to the establishment of a consortium of nine universities and interprofessional organizations. This collaboration resulted in a series of research studies and the development of a conceptual framework to guide the planning and review of interprofessional health curricula. A case study of the development of a suite of health education programs at a regional university in Australia is used to demonstrate how the framework can be used to guide curricular reflection and to plan for the future. Shedding a light on interprofessional health education activities across multiple sites provides a rich picture of current practices and future trends. Commonalities, gaps, and challenges become much more obvious and allow for the development of shared opportunities and solutions. Conclusions: The production of a shared conceptual framework to facilitate interprofessional curriculum development provides valuable strategies for curricular reflection, review, and forward planning.
    • Values production through social and emotional learning

      Wood, Peter; University of Derby (Routledge, 2015)
      This chapter considers if social and emotional learning(SEL) schemes have the potential to marginalise and promote certain values, norms and behaviours, to guard against cultural pollution. It explores the historical underpinnings of values education and highlights concerns regarding values production via the national and hidden curriculum. Education serves a function for society as it should shape social beings by instilling shared moral traditions, practices and ideals. Such opinion is also demonstrable in terminology of various acts of parliament in the United Kingdom, like 1944 Education Act and the Education Reform Act 1988, which both identified the central role of education system in values production. The National Curriculum, which stemmed from latter of these acts, was the first step in explicitly recognising the integral tenet of schooling in shaping the values of pupils, by making it compulsory for schools. Current educational policy and its narrow emphasis on academic performance is one of the obvious barriers to the realisation of mutual reach.
    • VET realignment and the development of technical elites: learning at work in England

      Esmond, Bill; Atkins, Liz; University of Derby (European Research Network in Vocational Education and Training (VETNET), 2020-08-11)
      An enhanced role for work-based learning is advocated increasingly widely across industrialised countries and by international VET policies. However, this is framed differently in each country by long-term policy orientations that reflect VET’s relationship with wider economic and social formations. These national differences reflect path dependency but also distinctive responses to contemporary challenges such as globalisation. In England, recent reforms strengthening workplace learning are constrained by existing patterns of skill formation and may be shaped by further market liberalisation and divergence from social and economic policies in Europe. The study examined the relationship between greater emphasis on workplace learning in England and societal change, addressing the research question: how are early experiences of work in England, as part of young people’s full-time education programmes, positioning them for future employment? Case studies were organised around apparently distinctive placement types that had emerged from earlier studies. Using the constant comparative method, the team identified a series of categories to distinguish the way each type of work-based learning positioned students in a particular type of labour market transition. Evidence emerged of divergence in England’s ‘further education’ system, across mainly male ‘technical’ routes, young people on vocational courses preparing them for routine, low-skilled, precarious employment, and an area of greater uncertainty preparing young people for digital routes linked to the ‘new economy’. Key dimensions of difference included study locations, discourses of occupational status, types of valued learning content, approaches to socialisation, sources of expertise and processes of credentialisation. In each case, learning at work served to position students for a particular type of labour market transition, which we characterise as technical elite formation, welfare VET and new economy precarity. Approaches to workplace learning in England already reflect social distinctions but entail the possibility of reinforcing these, supporting a more hierarchical pattern of labour market transition. Whilst the upper strata of VET shift their purpose to support the formation of new ‘technical elites’, others face the possibility of further marginalisation. Such new inequalities could become central to a further fragmented society in a post-Brexit, post-COVID-19 Britain. Other European states facing challenges of globalisation and the transition to services are also likely to experience pressures for VET stratification, although they may seek less divisive solutions.
    • Vocational teachers and workplace learning: integrative, complementary and implicit accounts of boundary crossing

      Esmond, Bill; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2020-05-25)
      Where young people’s upper-secondary education spans work and institutional domains, questions arise about learning across both spheres and its guidance. Theoretical accounts of ‘boundary crossing’ have explored how vocational teachers can integrate learning across domains by drawing on extended concepts and theoretical knowledge to solve workplace problems; whilst empirical accounts have validated the role of vocational educators by describing the workplace and schools as equally valid, complementary spheres. Different understandings, described here as ‘integrative’, ‘complementary’ and ‘implicit’, appear to reflect different national patterns of vocational education. The paper reports a qualitative study conducted around two case studies, located in Germany and England, of the way vocational teachers’ understandings of facilitating learning across domains are constructed. Vocational teachers working in Germany’s ‘dual training’ claimed to provide advanced knowledge that they compared to practical work skills, reflecting ‘implicit’ or ‘complementary’ approaches to learning across domains. Teachers in England, where workplace learning elements are more unevenly developed and lack institutional foundations, nevertheless described colleges and workplaces as distinctive, little-connected spheres. These differences suggest that teachers’ approaches are less shaped by the potential or necessity for ‘integrative’ approaches than by the way different systems enable or constrain their conceptualisation of ‘possible futures’.
    • What do researchers do? Career profiles of doctoral graduates

      Hooley, Tristram; Videler, Tennie; CRAC (The Careers Research and Advisory Centre (CRAC), 2009)
    • What does good careers advice look like?

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Westminster Employment Forum, 2015)
    • What teachers need to know

      Hardman, Alison; University of Derby (2016-07-07)
      Set within the current context of teaching and teacher education, this presentation will explore what at first glance seems a simplistic question: What do Teachers Need to Know? Drawing upon some pertinent international perspectives and implications for practice, the presentation will reflect upon important philosophical viewpoints that serve to frame perceptions of teacher knowledge. By addressing some of the wider political, professional and pedagogical considerations allied to this focus, the presentation raises some key questions for the very future of the profession.
    • What works in careers and enterprise?

      The Careers & Enterprise Company; Hooley, Tristram; The Careers & Enterprise Company (The Careers & Enterprise Company, 2016)
      The Careers & Enterprise Company believes that young people should be given the best support available to develop their careers and to make choices about education and employment.
    • Who do you want me to be? An exploration of female and male perceptions of imposed gender roles in the early years

      Brownhill, Simon; Oates, Ruby (Taylor and Francis, 2016-03-24)
      This paper provides an exploratory discussion surrounding the views and experiences of women and men who work/train in the early years (0-8 years) by bringing together select findings from two independent doctoral research projects. In an effort to weave together the voices of females and males working/training in the early years sector, this paper focuses its attention on the different ways in which their working roles are constructed and the possible ways in which this leads to the imposition of gender roles upon professionals in the 0-8 workforce in England.
    • Who wins the rat race? Social justice and the graduate labour market

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Graduate Prospects Ltd., 2015-10)
    • Why are there no great women artists? The positioning of women artists within fine art and craft.

      Yates, Ellen; University of Derby (2018-03-07)
      Nochlin‘s 1971 essay Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists? highlighted the barriers that women have faced within the world of fine art to be recognised , valued and exhibited. These include socio cultural and socio- economic factors, access to education, space, time and institutional barriers. Dominant discourses around the positioning of women’s work draw upon the status of the artist as ‘amateur’ or ‘professional’, alongside continuing debates in relation to the fine art/ craft divide and the status afforded to each. The dominance of the gendered masculine ideal , encompassing an ‘artist as genius’ stereotype pervades, despite advances in the public face of women’s art. (Korsmeyer 2004) This has led many women (and increasingly men) to seek refuge in the domain of craft as a more fruitful platform for exploring ideas. Women artists have used the visual language of craft to explore political ideas and to disrupt, challenge and parody dominant discourses about what can be considered ‘fine art’ and what it is to be ‘an artist’. This paper will explore these ideas in relation to examples of women’s work in the recent past in fine art and craft and contemporary work. The utilisation of craft by men will also be considered. The paper will conclude with an exploration of what is required to be a successful ‘artist’ in today’s world of self -promotion, online galleries and entrepenurship.