• School belonging among young adolescents with SEMH and MLD: the link with their social relations and school inclusivity

      Dimitrellou, Eleni; Hurry, Jane; University of Derby; Institute of Education, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, University of London, London, UK (Taylor & Francis, 2018-08-20)
      Despite the considerable institutional changes schools have made to accommodate the individual needs of pupils with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), as underpinned by key principles of inclusion, there is still international concern about the mainstream experiences pupils with SEND have in school settings. This study helps us understand the schooling experiences of pupils with behavioural difficulties and learning difficulties by investigating whether they have a sense of belonging and positive social relations and whether these vary according to the level of inclusiveness of the school ethos at the institution they attend. Perceived social relations and feelings of belonging of 1,440 (282 SEND) young adolescents from three secondary mainstream settings that differ in inclusivity, were analysed using a self-reporting questionnaire. Findings demonstrated that pupils with SEND are not a homogeneous group, as pupils with behavioural difficulties were found to have less of a sense of belonging, and social relations than those with learning difficulties. It was also found that the sense of belonging of both groups is associated with their positive perceived relations with teachers and their inclusiveness of school ethos. These findings contribute as they offer ways of enhancing the sense of belonging of pupils with behavioural and learning difficulties in schools.
    • A school for our community: Critically assessing discourses of marginality in the establishment of a free school

      Tupling, Claire; University of Derby (Policy Press, 2017-06-28)
      In 2010 the Coalition Government announced its flagship Free School policy. Designed to be responsive to the needs of local communities, Free Schools are state funded and independent of local authority control. Adding to a diverse school system, the UK Government claims Free Schools increase the availability of ‘good’ schools, therefore providing greater choice for parents. The stated aim of this educational reform is to raise standards and narrow the attainment gap by targeting under-performance in disadvantaged areas. However, social justice concerns have suggested that Free Schools may not reflect the diversity of local communities, attracting the least disadvantaged pupils and therefore failing to offer increased educational opportunities for the most disadvantaged pupils despite the requirement that their admission criteria are fair and transparent. A limited number of recent studies of the Free Schools policy have used statistical data in assessing the extent of social segregation and how admissions criteria can result in a segregated intake, suggesting that these schools may indeed be serving pupils from more advantaged backgrounds. This chapter adds to that discussion by exploring the nebulous nature of the term ‘community’ in relation to the establishment of a Free School in, the community of Newtown (a pseudonym) in the North East of England. Drawing on Anderson’s concept of ‘imagined communities’ this chapter will demonstrate how the term ‘community’ has been employed in key documents written by the Newtown Free School proposers to identify and secure a school for pupils within Newtown. Newtown will be revealed as a relative socially advantaged community, but one where marginalisation, associated with schooling, is claimed to characterise the lives of the young people living there. As a consequence a Free School is proposed to tackle this marginalisation and create a community.
    • Self-harm - dispelling the myths.

      Davey, Ang; Davey, Anna; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-08-23)
    • ‘The self-improving primary school’: understanding and approaching teacher inquiry: a pilot study

      Poultney, Val; University of Derby (University of Cumbria, 2016-01)
      This paper examines how one primary school in the East Midlands region has worked to establish a culture of teacher-led, evidence-based teacher inquiry. It reports on a pilot year of research when the senior leadership team (SLT) decided to implement a strategic focus on evidence-based teaching, which would generate their own school knowledge, equip teachers to take more responsibility for their own teaching and professional development and to broaden their local and national networks. The SLT led the inquiry process using various initiatives as suggested vehicles for inquiry with the aim of galvanising teaching staff into making changes to their pedagogical approaches. Working with a local HEI academic as supporter of this process and advisor to the Head teacher, appropriate practice-based methodologies were deployed, trialled, role-modelled and evaluated by the SLT. A local HEI academic advised the SLT on the implementation of this approach, which was followed up by a small scale piece of research and evaluation to further inform the evidence base.
    • The SENCO as a leader of professional learning for inclusive practice

      Robinson, Deborah; University of Derby (Routledge, 2021-04-22)
      This chapter explores the theory and practice of professional development for inclusive practice. The SENCO’s remit to ‘inspire inclusive practice’ (Wharton, Codina, Middleton and Esposito, 2019, p16) through leading teacher learning and Continuing Professional Development (CPD) is theoretically framed within epistemologies of difference and ontologies of change so that the challenges of this remit are treated with the depth they demand. The chapter defends practice inquiry for transformational teacher development towards inclusion. Using the example of Lesson Study, it explores Practice Inquiry as a form of CPD of value to SENCOs. A core argument in the chapter is that Practice Inquiry has the capacity to loosen unhelpful, obdurate paradigms of learning difficulty with positive consequences for practice. The purpose of the chapter is to provide a meaningful framework for SENCOs to theorise their CPD remit and how it might be implemented to make inclusion more enduringly manifest in the classroom.
    • Sexuality and sexualization in childhood (Mexico).

      Salinas-Quiroz, Fernando; Universidad Pedagogica Nacional (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
    • A shot in the arm for teacher education within FE

      Walker, Ben; University of Lincoln (2016-06)
    • Socio-technical imaginary of the fourth industrial revolution and its implications for vocational education and training: a literature review

      Avis, James; University of Huddersfield (Informa UK Limited, 2018-08-21)
      This literature review engages with a diverse and sometimes contradictory body of work, employing an analytic stance rooted in policy scholarship. It discusses rhetorical constructions of the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4th IR), locating these in understandings of the economy rooted in a neo-liberalism which rests upon a capitalist terrain. The 4th IR is an ideological construct which reflects specific material interests and has particular implications for education and training. The 4th IR’s association with digitalisation and artificial intelligence is ambivalent. For some writers, this leads to technological unemployment while for others, even though there is labour market disruption, there is no employment crisis that cannot be resolved. The strong connection between the 4th IR and labour market requirements is softened by those writers who adopt a qualitative analysis of advanced manufacturing work. These scholars suggest that the relationship between technology and skill is rather more complex than the protagonists of technological unemployment describe. Neo-Marxist writers develop a qualitatively different account of the current conjuncture to the imaginary of the 4th IR. In this instance, the analysis turns towards the elimination of labour from paid employment, together with the falling rate of profit and bypasses the former arguments. This review concludes by arguing that technology and artificial intelligence are entwined with social relations, being sites of class struggle. How this is played out is an outcome of the balance of power, not only within the social formation but also globally. How far the development of the forces of production is compatible with capitalist relations is a moot point, as this is also a site of struggle. The paper draws out the implications for VET and considers progressive educational responses. However, such a practice needs to be set within a broader politics that is committed to the development of a socially just society.
    • Socrates for Teachers

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-04-04)
      This chapter introduces Plato’s Socrates and his philosophy. The nearest we can get to authentic Socratic thought is in Plato’s earlier dialogues where he presents the views of his tutor in powerful dramatic form. Socrates embodies in his life, and death, a commitment to freedom of speech that was not shared by the polis of Athens (or by most people today). Sections of Plato’s dramatic dialogues are presented at length to illustrate his life, his commitment to argument and to examining all beliefs however strongly held. Socrates embodies the critical spirit and the understanding that freedom of speech was the only way to knowledge. To convince anyone of the power of Socrates’ thinking and his moral example cannot be achieved through any introduction. The success of this chapter will be decided by those who go on to read the dialogues. If you stop here and pick up and read any of the Socratic dialogues, the Apology, the Crito, the Phaedo, the Protagoras, the Meno, or the Theaetetus then you will know the man without any intermediary other than Plato. The lesson of this chapter is: ‘always study the original texts’.
    • Special educational needs and disabilities in early childhood education (Mexico).

      Reyes, Andrea Saldivar; Guzmán Zamora, Josué; Universidad de Tlaxcala (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019-01-02)
    • Special needs and disabilities in childhood (Mexico).

      Reyes, Andrea Saldivar; Guzmán Zamora, Josué; Universidad de Tlaxcala (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
    • Student autonomy of feedback format in higher education and perceived functional behaviours for academic development

      Sparrow, Abby; Smith, Samantha; Petronzi, Dominic; Wilson, Helen; Roeschlaub, Sarah; Smith, Melanie; University of Derby (Octagon Education Consultancy, 2020-05-11)
      In the current context of promoting active learning and raising student engagement within Higher Education, an increasing amount of research has looked at pedagogical-based design and factors that contribute to functional behaviours surrounding the interaction and use of academic assessment feedback. However, few studies have considered the perceived influence of student autonomy over feedback format and whether this promotes engagement and academic development. In this study, we recruited level 5 and 6 students (N = 38) on an undergraduate Education Programme (that has consistently implemented student feedback choice) to participate in initial self-reporting and subsequent focus groups ("soft triangulation‟). The findings revealed three core themes: [1] Personalisation – (a) sense of autonomy/involvement, (b) engagement and (c) motivation, [2] Clarity – (d) depth and detail, and [3] Areas for development. Overall, these findings suggest that feedback type – and the inherent option to choose – has a functional impact on academic engagement and development. We discuss these findings in relation to a sense of being valued that was associated with autonomy of choice, a divergence in how and when students engage with feedback, as well as the requirement for academic clarity and provision of formats that support academic development.
    • The student practitioner as future leader

      Yates, Ellen; Simmons, Helen (Routledge, 2014)
      Leadership in Early Childhood is not easy to define due to the relational nature of working with young children, the diversity of settings providing for their care and education, and the wide range of roles and responsibilities which are implicit within these settings. Roles and responsibilities inevitably overlap and a leader in an early years setting may not be easy to distinguish from any other member of staff. However, strong and effective leadership is essential to the smooth running of early years settings and research identifies strong links between effective leadership and quality practice. (Siraj-Blatchford and Manni 2007) Identifying what is involved in leadership is therefore of paramount importance. This chapter will consider what is involved in a leadership role in practice and its importance in ensuring effective teamwork to provide the very best practice we can offer the children in our care.
    • The student practitioner as future leader

      Yates, Ellen; Simmons, Helen; University of Derby (Routledge, 2020-06-07)
    • The student practitioner in Early Childhood studies: an essential guide to working with children

      Oates, Ruby; Hey, Christine (Routledge, 2014)
      The Student Practitioner in Early Childhood Studies: An essential guide to working with children provides accessible support and guidance for Early Childhood Studies students in higher education who may have little, if any, experience of relating to young children in the Early Years Foundation Stage and Key Stage One. With useful chapter summaries, activities and reflection points to help readers track their academic journey, this text draws on the experiences of students on the degree programme for the benefit of students new to practice. It will: - prepare students for the challenges of practice - provide a synthesis of academic knowledge and practice skills - develop students' critically reflective thinking and understanding relational pedagogy and the needs of young children - provide the emerging student practitioner in higher education with knowledge, skills, understanding and confidence to relate effectively with young children and adults in settings Fully supporting students' practice experience and development of their critical thinking, this helpful book synthesises theory and practice in an applied and critical manner. The authors cover a range of themes including critical reflection, relational pedagogy, confidence building, communication skills, personal and professional development and employability alongside academic writing and research skills. This textbook is essential reading for students on all Early Childhood degree programmes.
    • Student reflections on the place of creativity in Early Years practice: Reflections on second year work placement experience

      Twigg, Emma; Yates, Ellen; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-02-02)
      This research has investigated student’s reflections on the place of creativity in early years practice with an emphasis on their second year of placement. It has developed from previous research conducted with first year students on a BA (Hons) Early Childhood Studies degree at an East Midlands university in the United Kingdom. Within this research student reflections have been captured in order to assist them to consider their observations on the value placed on creativity and how this is interpreted within practice both within early years and education settings. The study identified that both creative teaching and teaching for creativity were seen within the settings the students attended. Limitations were highlighted in relation to the value placed on creativity within these settings and the recognition of the consequences this can have on children in being unable to express their individuality and uniqueness. Lastly the research sought to explore the impact of a first year module ‘Play and Creativity’ on students own creative abilities and their practice with children. Findings indicate that the module positively influenced students’ creative capabilities and also the promotion and encouragement of creative abilities in children
    • Surveillance of modern motherhood: Experiences of universal parenting courses

      Simmons, Helen; University of Derby (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020-08-23)
      This book explores the reflections and experiences of mothers of children aged 0-3 years that have attended universal parenting courses. Simmons considers the factors that motivated mothers to attend a universal parenting course and explore the wider experiences of early modern motherhood in the UK. She investigates participants' perceptions of benefits of attending a parenting course, different forms of parenting advice accessed by mothers, and how this provides an insight into the wider constructs and experiences of modern motherhood. Ultimately, the book considers, through a feminist post-structuralist lens, the social and cultural pressures within modern motherhood in relation to different levels of surveillance, and produces new knowledge for practice within the early years and health sectors in relation to the support currently offered to new mothers. It will be of interest to students and scholars across the sociology of education, gender studies, and childhood studies.
    • Surveying the religious and non-religious online

      Hooley, Tristram; Weller, Paul; University of Derby (Bloomsbury, 2015-12)
      This volume considers the implementation difficulties of researching religion online and reflects on the ethical dilemmas faced by sociologists of religion when using digital research methods. Bringing together established and emerging scholars, global case studies draw on the use of social media as a method for researching religious oppression, religion and identity in virtual worlds, digital communication within religious organisations, and young people's diverse expressions of faith online. Additionally, boxed tips are provided throughout the text to serve as reminders of tools that readers may use in their own research projects. - See more at: http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/digital-methodologies-in-the-sociology-of-religion-9781472571182/#sthash.p6wueWT2.dpuf
    • Symposium on online practice in counselling and guidance

      Goss, Stephen; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (2015)