• Making a little difference for early childhood studies students

      Oates, Ruby; Sanders, Andrew; Hey, Christine; White, Jon; Wood, Val; Yates, Ellen; University of Derby (Routledge, 2009)
    • Mapping young children’s conceptualisations of the images they encounter in their familiar environments

      Gowers, Sophia; University of Leicester (SAGE Publications, 2020-04-19)
      This article examines young children’s conceptualisation of the images they encounter within the familiar environments of the home and community settings, focusing on case study data from two, 4-year-old children. The data discussed are taken from a study involving a group of children aged 4–5 years. A participatory mapping approach was adopted, enabling children to be positioned as both message creators, through the production of their multimodal map texts, and message receivers as they sought to make meaning with the image-based texts they encountered within their environments. The use of a mapping activity supported identification of the children’s knowledge of different texts which may not so easily be put into words. The study revealed that, for children, the context and location of images are important, with the presence of images and artefacts enabling familiarity with a place. Furthermore, movement was identified as an intrinsic part of their multimodal engagements. Adopting a social semiotics theoretical framework, this study aims to explore the ways in which young children conceptualise images in their environment. This paper emphasises the need to take account of the embodied, spatial and multimodal nature of making practices, given the importance placed on these by young children themselves.
    • Masters with a purpose: summary report

      Artess, Jane; Ball, Charlie; Forbes, Peter; Hughes, Tristram; HECSU (Universities UK, 2014-05)
      This report documents and explores higher education institutions' engagement with employers in respect of postgraduate taught Masters courses. Findings suggest that there might be better outcomes for graduates and employers where Masters study is approached in a 'purposeful' way.
    • Maths mastery: The key to pedagogical liberation?

      Benson, David; University of Derby (Association of Teachers of Mathematics, 2016-12-20)
    • Maximising the impact of careers services on career management skills: a review of the literature

      Mackay, Susan; Morris, Marian; Hooley, Tristram; Neary, Siobhan; SQW; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (2016-04)
      The review identified an international body of work on the development and implementation of competency frameworks in reaction to CMS, including the ‘Blueprint’ frameworks, which are a series of inter-related national approaches to career management skills (originating in the USA and taken up subsequently, and with different emphases, by Canada, Australia, England and Scotland). There is, as yet, little empirical evidence to support the overall efficacy of CMS frameworks, but they have the advantage of setting out what needs to be learned (usually as a clear and identifiable list of skills, attributes and attitudes) and, often, how this learning is intended to happen. The international literature emphasised the iterative nature and mixture of formal and informal learning and life experiences that people needed to develop CMS. It suggested that, though there was no single intervention or group of interventions that appeared most effective in increasing CMS, there were five underpinning components of career guidance interventions that substantially increased effectiveness, particularly when combined. These included the use of narrative/writing approaches; the importance of providing a ‘safe’ environment; the quality of the adviser-client relationship; the need for flexibility in approach; the provision of specialist information and support; and clarity on the purpose and aims of action planning. The review also identified a possible emergent hierarchy around the efficacy of different modes of delivery of career guidance interventions on CMS development. Interventions involving practitioner contact and structured groups appeared more effective than self-directed interventions or unstructured groups. Computer-based interventions were found to work better when practitioner input was provided during the intervention or when they were followed up by a structured workshop session to discuss and review the results.
    • The McDonaldization of higher education

      Hayes, Dennis; Wynyard, Robin; Mandal, Luna; University of Derby (2017-07-12)
      2017 saw the publication of 'Beyond McDonaldization: Visions of Higher Education' (Routledge), the first chapter of which, 'Beyond the McDonaldization of Higher Education', develops and updates the ideas in this paper, which is an edited and revised version of the 'Introduction' to Dennis Hayes and Robin Wynyard’s book 'The McDonaldization of Higher Education' (Bergin and Garvey 2002). This well-received book introduced, and presented some criticisms of, the concept of 'McDonaldization' and examined the consequences of the process of McDonaldization to the university. A notable idea in the 2002 book was the concept of the 'therapeutic university' which, in part, explained the acquiescence of academics and students to the bureaucratising aspects of McDonaldization. The term is now widely used to describe a cultural climate in universities that sees today’s students as emotionally vulnerable and incapable of coping with challenging ideas.
    • The McDonaldization of higher education revisited.

      Hayes, Dennis; Wynyard, Robin; University of Derby (Routledge, 2016-06-02)
      Since The McDonaldization of Higher Education was published in 2002 the McDonaldizing processes of efficiency, predictability, reliability and control seem to have come to dominate universities throughout the world through turning students into consumers who buy degrees made up of bite-sized, credit-rated modules, subjecting universities to the requirements of national and global league tables and re-constructing lecturers as facilitators of the ‘student experience’. The success of university management in restructuring universities as McBusinesses is premised on a seeming contradiction. As universities have been McDonaldized they have spontaneously embraced therapy culture and have become therapeutic universities. The therapeutic approach towards students adopted by management was supported by academics who failed to see or challenge the new student-centred culture. Therapy Culture was not contradictory but complementary to the ruthless McDonaldization of universities. Discussions of the marketization and bureaucratization of higher education have been ineffectual in terms of understanding the importance of the therapeutic turn and therefore have not been able to cohere any effective resistance to McDonaldization. Taking our previous work forward, we examine the ineluctable connection between the forces leading to McDonaldization and the therapeutic turn and how they are leading to the McDonaldization of the student soul.
    • Measure learner performance on a scale of 1 to 10

      Walker, Ben; Stalk, Andrew; University of Lincoln (2015)
    • The mental health needs of refugee pupils.

      Hewitt, Shirley; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-08-23)
    • Migration and mobility in childhood (Mexico).

      Mancillas Bazan, Celia; Figueroa Diaz, Maria Elena; Universidad Iberoamericana (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
    • More morphostasis than morphogenesis? The ‘dual professionalism’ of English Further Education workshop tutors

      Esmond, Bill; Wood, Hayley; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2017-03-27)
      An international repositioning of vocational teachers in relation to knowledge and the workplace is reflected in English Further Education through the terminology of ‘dual professionalism’. Particularly in settings most closely linked to specific occupations, this discourse privileges occupational expertise that vocational educators bring from their former employment alongside pedagogic expectations of the teaching role. In a qualitative study of recently qualified teachers employed substantially in workshop settings, using the analytical framework of Margaret Archer, workplace skills and generic attributes provided a basis for claims to expertise, extending to a custodianship of former occupations. Further augmentation of educator roles, however, appeared constrained by market approaches to development and employment insecurity in the sector and beyond. In Archer’s terms, the current environment appears to cast ‘dual professionalism’ as morphostasis, drawing on former practice at the expense of teacher identity in the face of insecurity. Morphogenesis into enhanced professional teacher identities, for example, developing coherent vocational pedagogies informed by research into advances in knowledge, appears the less likely outcome in the current and emerging sector.
    • NAHT Aspire Pilot Evaluation (Executive Summary)

      Neary, Siobhan; Dodd, Vanessa; Radford, Neil; Institute of Education (2016-01)
      The NAHT Aspire Partner Schools programme is based on a multi-strand approach to school improvement. It utilises a five strand design focusing on, leadership, assessment for learning, learning environment, pedagogy and curriculum, and student and family support. This is delivered within clusters groups, underpinned by distributed leadership and supported by external advisers. The model is aligned with current international research on school improvement and effectiveness. It aims to support schools to progress from a Requires Improvement Ofsted assessment to a Good grading within three years. This evaluation reports on the implementation and the impact of NAHT Aspire at just over the two-year point in the programme (six of the nine term cycles of activity). Participants believe that it has improved their school, has empowered teaching staff and built leadership capacity. In addition, it is cost effective and has provided value for money when compared with the costs of forced academisation.
    • ‘The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few’ Support for children with SEND in times of austerity

      Bloor, Andy; university of derby (Routledge, 2020-10-20)
      This chapter considers some of the moral and theoretical perspectives around the debate surrounding the allocation of resources in schools in recent times. It examines if there are any moral imperatives around the debates on how we fund education for all children, but particularly those with a Special Educational Need and Disability (SEND). The author explores what responses we can and should make when faced with difficult choices around funding and what current theory and argument can do to support us in making considered, proactive, positive and empowering choices.
    • New strategy to transform the quality of careers education, advice and guidance for young people

      Andrews, David; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2016)
      This paper, based on David's experience of having been directly involved in careers work for young people over 35 years, offers some personal suggestions about what should be included in the forthcoming strategy for careers education and guidance. The aim of this strategy should be to ensure that the careers support that young people experience provides them with the help that they need to progress successfully through learning and into work. It should prepare them for lives and careers where they will have to navigate a complex and challenging landscape of education, training and employment.
    • Now we don’t see the university as something distant. It’s here in our hands’: situated pedagogy in Cuban municipal universities

      Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Institute for Education Policy Studies, 04/2019)
      The first years of the twenty-first century saw the introduction of a new mode of higher education in Cuba. Local university centres were set up across the country offering part time study to a range of students previously marginalised from higher education. As well as massively increasing access, this programme created a new kind of teacher – local professionals teaching part-time alongside their regular employment. Using the personal testimony of students and teachers in rural Granma, this paper examines the role of these teachers, with a particular emphasis on the value of their capacity to offer a pedagogy situated in the workplaces, communities and daily lives of their students.
    • Only qualifications count: Exploring perceptions of continuing professional development (CPD) within the career guidance sector.

      Neary, Siobhan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS); University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2016-05-03)
      This paper explores the views of a group of career development practitioners undertaking a postgraduate qualification as a form of continuing professional development (CPD). It offers insights into how these practitioners perceive and view different forms of CPD. A case study methodology was adopted to gather examples of CPD activities practitioners engaged in and the value placed on these in supporting the development of professional practice. Their views were synthesised to create a typology representing a differentiated model of CPD. The model proposes three types of CPD: operational, experiential and formal. Formal CPD is perceived as having the highest value in developing professional practice. The study supports a deeper understanding of how careers practitioners engage with and understand CPD.
    • Our teachers: Collected memories of primary education in Derbyshire schools from 1944 - 2009

      Shelton, Fiona; University of Derby (InScience Press, 2019-05-01)
      This paper presents findings from narrative interviews undertaken with 24 narrators who attended primary school in the decades from 1944 - 2009. Deductive themes were first selected by examining the quantity of content and relevance to the study. Four deductive themes were drawn from the narrators’ recollections: Our Teachers; The Lessons We Learned; Our Friendships and the Games We Played and finally The Books we Read. The focus of this paper is on the findings from one of the deductive themes: Our Teachers. Once the stories had been transcribed, they were analysed for inductive themes. These were identified as: Pupil-teacher relationship, noted across each of the decades. A gendered workforce, reflected in each decade, except 1999-2009. Teacher personality was common across all decades. Corporal punishment was common in the decades from 1944-1987, but not present after 1987. Finally, Teacher professionalism was a prevalent theme in most decades except 1999-2009. Key findings related to the connections that come with the relationship the teacher forms with their pupils. Teachers who break the mould are well remembered by pupils. The nature of the primary school workforce has changed since 1944, and is now perceived as being female dominated. Because of changes to legislation, the role of the teacher has evolved, the changes in professional behaviour are noted in the narrators’ stories, from decade to decade.
    • Overview of childhood (Mexico).

      Delgado-Fuentes, Marco Antonio; University of Derby (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
    • Overview of early childhood education (Mexico)

      Delgado-Fuentes, Marco; University of Derby (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2020-10-26)
      This article is part of the Bloomsbury Education and Childhood Studies online resource. It discusses the current educational system in the country for children under six, in the levels of Initial Education and Preschool Education. It includes issues on age range, the role of government in ECE, key providers, programs and services, staff and current challenges.