• Language development

      Nahmad-Williams, Lindy; Fenton, Carol; University of Derby; Sheffield Hallam University (Routledge, 2018-02-16)
    • Leadership and collaboration: Further developments for interprofessional education

      Forman, Dawn; Jones, Marion; Thistlethwaite, Jill; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)
      Leadership and Collaboration provides international examples of how leadership of interprofessional education and practice has developed in various countries and examines how interprofessional education and collaborative practice can make a difference to the care of the patient, client and community.
    • Leadership and management of early years settings.

      Johnston, Chris; Johnston, Jane; House, Angela; Fenton, Carol; University of Plymouth; Bishop Grosseteste University; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-02-16)
    • Leadership development for interprofessional education and collaborative practice

      Forman, Dawn; Jones, Marion; Thistlethwaite, Jill; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014)
      Leadership Development of Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice is an edited compilation of chapters written by international medical and health professional experts. The book provides historical and current perspectives on leadership in healthcare.
    • Leadership in early childhood: Leader's views on their role

      Simmons, Helen; Yates, Ellen (Aberystwyth University, 2014)
      Changes in the sector in relation to the structure of early childhood education and care, and legislation have made leadership a multifaceted and demanding role. Currently there is little training available and limited research (Siraj Blatchford and Manni (2006) and Rodd (1997)). This paper explores leaders views of their role within a range of Early Childhood settings. Research was gathered from Early Childhood Studies students in their final year on the BA (Hons) ECS programme. The research examines how these early years practitioners perceive the practice of leadership and identifies some of the daily realities of leadership. The research explores leaders views on their role including perceived barriers to effective leadership and causes of conflict within teams. Many of the participants find themselves in positions of leadership early in their careers, where their role focuses on managing adults and administrative tasks rather than working with children. Participants expressed frustration in the career path for leaders in early childhood often being based on excellent practice. They also expressed concern over having received little or no training for the leadership roles they find themselves in, which deal with finance, administration and staff issues rather than working with children.
    • Leading research and evaluation in interprofessional education and collaborative practice

      Forman, Dawn; Jones, Marion; Thistlethwaite, Jill; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016)
      Expanding upon Leadership Development for Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice and Leadership and Collaboration, the third installment to this original and innovative collection of books considers a variety of research models and theories. Emphasizing research and evaluation in leadership aspects, Leading Research and Evaluation in Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice
    • Linguistics for TESOL: theory and practice

      Valenzuela, Hannah; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020)
      This textbook proposes a theoretical approach to linguistics in relation to teaching English. Combining research with practical classroom strategies and activities, it aims to satisfy the needs of new and experienced TESOL practitioners, helping them to understand the features of the English language and how those features impact on students in the classroom. The author provides a toolkit of strategies and practical teaching ideas to inspire and support practitioners in the classroom, encouraging reflection through regular stop-and-think tasks, so that practitioners have the opportunity to deepen their understanding and relate it to their own experience and practice. This book will appeal to students and practitioners in the fields of applied linguistics, TESOL, EAL, English language and linguistics, EAP, and business English.
    • Listening to Los Beatles: being young in 1960s Cuba

      Luke, Anne; University of Derby (Indiana University Press, 2013)
    • Looking to the future: Framing the implementation of interprofessional education and practice with scenario planning

      Forman, Dawn; Nicol, Pam; Nicol, Paul; University of Derby (Wolters Kluwer, 2015-12)
      Background: Adapting to interprofessional education and practice requires a change of perspective for many health professionals. We aimed to explore the potential of scenario planning to bridge the understanding gap and framing strategic planning for interprofessional education (IPE) and practice (IPP), as well as to implement innovative techniques and technology for large‑group scenario planning. Methods: A full‑day scenario planning workshop incorporating innovative methodology was designed and offered to participants. The 71 participants included academics from nine universities, as well as service providers, government, students and consumer organisations. The outcomes were evaluated by statistical and thematic analysis of a mixed method survey questionnaire. Results: The scenario planning method resulted in a positive response as a means of collaboratively exploring current knowledge and broadening entrenched attitudes. It was perceived to be an effective instrument for framing strategy for the implementation of IPE/IPP, with 81 percent of respondents to a post‑workshop survey indicating they would consider using scenario planning in their own organisations. Discussion: The scenario planning method can be used by tertiary academic institutions as a strategy in developing, implementing and embedding IPE, and for the enculturation of IPP in practice settings.
    • Making a little difference for early childhood studies students

      Oates, Ruby; Sanders, Andrew; Hey, Christine; White, Jon; Wood, Val; Yates, Ellen; University of Derby (Routledge, 2009)
    • Mapping young children’s conceptualisations of the images they encounter in their familiar environments

      Gowers, Sophia; University of Leicester (SAGE Publications, 2020-04-19)
      This article examines young children’s conceptualisation of the images they encounter within the familiar environments of the home and community settings, focusing on case study data from two, 4-year-old children. The data discussed are taken from a study involving a group of children aged 4–5 years. A participatory mapping approach was adopted, enabling children to be positioned as both message creators, through the production of their multimodal map texts, and message receivers as they sought to make meaning with the image-based texts they encountered within their environments. The use of a mapping activity supported identification of the children’s knowledge of different texts which may not so easily be put into words. The study revealed that, for children, the context and location of images are important, with the presence of images and artefacts enabling familiarity with a place. Furthermore, movement was identified as an intrinsic part of their multimodal engagements. Adopting a social semiotics theoretical framework, this study aims to explore the ways in which young children conceptualise images in their environment. This paper emphasises the need to take account of the embodied, spatial and multimodal nature of making practices, given the importance placed on these by young children themselves.
    • Masters with a purpose: summary report

      Artess, Jane; Ball, Charlie; Forbes, Peter; Hughes, Tristram; HECSU (Universities UK, 2014-05)
      This report documents and explores higher education institutions' engagement with employers in respect of postgraduate taught Masters courses. Findings suggest that there might be better outcomes for graduates and employers where Masters study is approached in a 'purposeful' way.
    • Maths mastery: The key to pedagogical liberation?

      Benson, David; University of Derby (Association of Teachers of Mathematics, 2016-12-20)
    • Maximising the impact of careers services on career management skills: a review of the literature

      Mackay, Susan; Morris, Marian; Hooley, Tristram; Neary, Siobhan; SQW; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (2016-04)
      The review identified an international body of work on the development and implementation of competency frameworks in reaction to CMS, including the ‘Blueprint’ frameworks, which are a series of inter-related national approaches to career management skills (originating in the USA and taken up subsequently, and with different emphases, by Canada, Australia, England and Scotland). There is, as yet, little empirical evidence to support the overall efficacy of CMS frameworks, but they have the advantage of setting out what needs to be learned (usually as a clear and identifiable list of skills, attributes and attitudes) and, often, how this learning is intended to happen. The international literature emphasised the iterative nature and mixture of formal and informal learning and life experiences that people needed to develop CMS. It suggested that, though there was no single intervention or group of interventions that appeared most effective in increasing CMS, there were five underpinning components of career guidance interventions that substantially increased effectiveness, particularly when combined. These included the use of narrative/writing approaches; the importance of providing a ‘safe’ environment; the quality of the adviser-client relationship; the need for flexibility in approach; the provision of specialist information and support; and clarity on the purpose and aims of action planning. The review also identified a possible emergent hierarchy around the efficacy of different modes of delivery of career guidance interventions on CMS development. Interventions involving practitioner contact and structured groups appeared more effective than self-directed interventions or unstructured groups. Computer-based interventions were found to work better when practitioner input was provided during the intervention or when they were followed up by a structured workshop session to discuss and review the results.
    • The McDonaldization of higher education

      Hayes, Dennis; Wynyard, Robin; Mandal, Luna; University of Derby (2017-07-12)
      2017 saw the publication of 'Beyond McDonaldization: Visions of Higher Education' (Routledge), the first chapter of which, 'Beyond the McDonaldization of Higher Education', develops and updates the ideas in this paper, which is an edited and revised version of the 'Introduction' to Dennis Hayes and Robin Wynyard’s book 'The McDonaldization of Higher Education' (Bergin and Garvey 2002). This well-received book introduced, and presented some criticisms of, the concept of 'McDonaldization' and examined the consequences of the process of McDonaldization to the university. A notable idea in the 2002 book was the concept of the 'therapeutic university' which, in part, explained the acquiescence of academics and students to the bureaucratising aspects of McDonaldization. The term is now widely used to describe a cultural climate in universities that sees today’s students as emotionally vulnerable and incapable of coping with challenging ideas.
    • The McDonaldization of higher education revisited.

      Hayes, Dennis; Wynyard, Robin; University of Derby (Routledge, 2016-06-02)
      Since The McDonaldization of Higher Education was published in 2002 the McDonaldizing processes of efficiency, predictability, reliability and control seem to have come to dominate universities throughout the world through turning students into consumers who buy degrees made up of bite-sized, credit-rated modules, subjecting universities to the requirements of national and global league tables and re-constructing lecturers as facilitators of the ‘student experience’. The success of university management in restructuring universities as McBusinesses is premised on a seeming contradiction. As universities have been McDonaldized they have spontaneously embraced therapy culture and have become therapeutic universities. The therapeutic approach towards students adopted by management was supported by academics who failed to see or challenge the new student-centred culture. Therapy Culture was not contradictory but complementary to the ruthless McDonaldization of universities. Discussions of the marketization and bureaucratization of higher education have been ineffectual in terms of understanding the importance of the therapeutic turn and therefore have not been able to cohere any effective resistance to McDonaldization. Taking our previous work forward, we examine the ineluctable connection between the forces leading to McDonaldization and the therapeutic turn and how they are leading to the McDonaldization of the student soul.
    • Measure learner performance on a scale of 1 to 10

      Walker, Ben; Stalk, Andrew; University of Lincoln (2015)
    • The mental health needs of refugee pupils.

      Hewitt, Shirley; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-08-23)
    • Migration and mobility in childhood (Mexico).

      Mancillas Bazan, Celia; Figueroa Diaz, Maria Elena; Universidad Iberoamericana (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)