• ‘I don’t make out how important it is or anything’: identity and identity formation by part-time higher education students in an English further education college.

      Esmond, Bill; Chesterfield College (Taylor & Francis, 2012-07-04)
      Policymakers in England have recently, in common with other Anglophone countries, encouraged the provision of higher education within vocational Further Education Colleges. Policy documents have emphasised the potential contribution of college-based students to widening participation: yet the same students contribute in turn to the difficulties of this provision. This article draws on a study of part-time higher education students in a college, a group whose perspectives, identities and voices have been particularly neglected by educational research. Respondents’ narratives of non-participation at 18 indicated the range of social and geographical constraints shaping their decisions and their aspirations beyond higher education; whilst they drew on vocational and adult traditions to legitimate college participation, their construction of identity was also shaped by the boundaries between further education and the university. These distinctive processes illustrate both possibilities and constraints for future higher education provision within colleges
    • ‘If you look the part you’ll get the job’: should career professionals help clients to enhance their career image?

      Yates, Julia; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2014)
      This article presents a critical exploration of the role of career professionals in supporting people to reflect on and enhance their appearance, attractiveness and self-presentation (career image). The article is conceptual and based on a review of the broader literature on career success, appearance and attractiveness. It explores the evidence for a relationship between attractiveness and career, and the authors propose a conceptual framework in which career image is comprised of three elements (interpersonal skills, aesthetic presentation and beauty). The paper examines a possible role for career professionals in relation to this and then critically examines this role and concludes with the proposition of a research agenda in this area.
    • The impact of career guidance on progression in learning and work: a literature review

      Neary, Siobhan; Hooley, Tristram; Morris, Marian; Mackay, Susan; SQW; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (2016-04)
      This paper sets out the findings of a review of the literature on how career guidance can support individuals to progress to positive learning and work destinations. It argues that positive progression is a legitimate and appropriate outcome of career guidance, although access to career guidance is only one amongst a range of factors that might influence an individual’s likelihood of progressing. It also notes that progression can be difficult to measure in research. The initial review found a range of evidence which demonstrated that career guidance can have a positive influence on individuals’ progression to learning and work. It highlighted a number of features that underpin the effectiveness of career guidance in this area. 1. Services need to be provided in a timely fashion, and as quickly after an individual has dropped out of learning or work as possible. 2. Services need to be provided professionally by skilled advisers. In addition to these points, the paper advances a model of the features of effective practice that support individuals to engage positively with progression. This focuses on establishing positive attitudes and behaviours, engaging in developing and effectively applying job search skills and creating a support network using both informal and formal sources. The evidence suggests that all of these interventions are useful, but multiple integrated activities are most successful, especially if they focus on building motivation as well as job search skills.
    • In defence of teacher education

      Hayes, Dennis; Marshall, Toby; University of Derby (Standing Committee for the Education and Training of Teachers (SCETT), 2011-03)
      A series of short essays by leading educationalists and trade unionists in response to the Coalition Government's document 'The Importance of Teaching: The Schools White Paper' (DfE 2010). The essays are grouped under three broad headings: 'What do teachers want from teacher education?' 'Who will defend teacher education?' and 'What can higher education offer teacher education?'
    • Inclusive practice in the primary school

      Robinson, Deborah; Trussler, Sarah; University of Derby (Sage, 2015-01-25)
      Do you want to feel more confident when teaching children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND)? Would you like to be a more inclusive teacher? This book provides clear and flexible frameworks for effective inclusive teaching, and explains how to teach and plan for supporting any child’s learning, no matter what their needs are. With case studies and activities the book: explains and contextualizes current beliefs towards SEN provides models for practice encourages you to engage in thinking about SEN and inclusion offers interactive reflection points throughout links out to research with suggestions for further reading
    • Inquiring Teachers, Inquiring learners

      Neary, Siobhan; Parker, Gordon; Marriott, John; Hutchinson, Jo; Scales, Pete; Centre for Education Research (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2014-08)
      This report details the Inquiring Teachers, Inquiring Learners project which was developed to support partner institutions to develop and apply a culture of action research within their organisation. The underlying principle of the project was professionalism and in particular the promotion and development of teachers’ professional identities and attitudes as the key to the enhancement of student learning, above all, a vision of the ‘inquiring teacher’. Inquiring teachers it is felt are more likely to develop inquiring learners. Teachers are best placed to know about their subjects and their learners’ needs within their local contexts. The project aimed to support partners of the School of Education to develop the skills and knowledge to define and undertake an action research project that would contribute to improving ITE within their context.
    • International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) Annual Review (2020)

      Neary, Siobhan; Hanson, Jill; Moore, Nicki; Staunton, Tom; Clark, Lewis; Blake, Hannah; Challacombe, Paul; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2020-12-09)
    • International insights: Equality in education

      Shelton, Fiona; Chiou, Vana; Holz, Oliver; Ertürk, Nesrin; University of Derby (Waxmann Verlag, 2019-08-15)
      Educational institutions should offer a safe and secure environment for young people. Part of that should be educational equity, which is a measure of achievement, fairness, and opportunity in education. This publication analyses and discusses educational equality from different angles. All contributions reflect on the current situation of 11 European countries. All of them are part of the Bologna process and are dealing with the challenges of the development of a European Higher Education Area. This ongoing process is reflected in the present publication, with a specific focus on equality in education. The authors cover aspects like inclusion and inequality, internationalizing education, and accessing education, but they also deal with learning foreign languages, education for the future, assessment, feedback and student success, lifelong learning, teacher training as well as different aspects of the LGB(T+) community and gender and education.
    • Interprofessional competencies: the poor cousin to clinical skills?

      Martin, Priya; Moran, Monica Catherine; Forman, Dawn; Darling Downs Hospital and Health Service; The University of Western Australia; University of Derby (Amee, 2017-07-07)
      The purpose of this paper is to clarify what work-based IPE is, challenge some common misconceptions about its values in clinical settings and highlight tools that will assist with its implementation in such settings.
    • Interprofessional education for first year psychology students: career plans, perceived relevance and attitudes

      Roberts, Lynne D.; Forman, Dawn; University of Derby (Taylor Francis, 2014-10-08)
      Undergraduate psychology students have been largely excluded from interprofessional education (IPE) initiatives. In contrast to many health professions, undergraduate psychology students do not engage in work placements as part of their degree, and many enter careers outside the health care context. However, the collaborative skills gained through an IPE experience may well be beneficial to students who work in this wider context. This research examines whether undergraduate psychology students’ views of IPE vary according to their planned career directions, and if so, whether the perceived relevance of IPE mediates the relationships. A sample of 188 Australian university undergraduate psychology students completed an online questionnaire following completion of a first-year IPE health sciences program. Path analysis indicated that psychology students’ attitudes towards IPE are associated with both professional identification and practitioner orientation, fully mediated through the perceived relevance of IPE to future career and study plans. Stronger professional identification and practitioner orientation were associated with greater perceived relevance and more positive and less negative attitudes towards IPE. Placing a stronger emphasis on the generalizability of IP skills taught may increase students’ awareness of the relevance outside of the health context, reducing disengagement of students planning alternative careers.
    • Interprofessional health education in Australia: Three research projects informing curriculum renewal and development

      Steketee, Carole; Forman, Dawn; Dunston, Roger; Yassine, Tagrid; Matthews, Lynda; Saunders, Rosemary; Nicol, Pam; Alliex, Selma; University of Derby; Curtin University (Elsevier, 2014-05)
      Purpose This paper reports on three interrelated Australian studies that provide a nationally coherent and evidence-informed approach to interprofessional education (IPE). Based on findings from previous studies that IPE tends to be marginalized in mainstream health curriculum, the three studies aspired to produce a range of resources that would guide the sustainable implementation of IPE across the Australian higher education sector. Method Nine national universities, two peak industry bodies and a non-government organization constituted the study team. Data were gathered via a mixture of stakeholder consultations, surveys and interviews and analyzed using quantitative and qualitative methods. Results & Conclusion An important outcome was a curriculum renewal framework which has been used to explore the implications of the study's findings on Australian nursing. While the findings are pertinent to all health professions, nursing is well placed to take a leading role in establishing IPE as a central element of health professional education.
    • Introducing the individual teamwork observation and feedback tool (iTOFT): Development and description of a new interprofessional teamwork measure

      Thistlethwaite, Jill; Dallest, Kathy; Moran, Monica Catherine; Dunston, Roger; Roberts, Chris; Eley, Diann; Bogossian, Fiona; Forman, Dawn; Bainbridge, Lesley; Drynan, Donna; et al. (Taylor and Francis, 2016-06-08)
      The individual Teamwork Observation and Feedback Tool (iTOFT) was devised by a consortium of seven universities in recognition of the need for a means of observing and giving feedback to individual learners undertaking an interprofessional teamwork task. It was developed through a literature review of the existing teamwork assessment tools, a discussion of accreditation standards for the health professions, Delphi consultation and field-testing with an emphasis on its feasibility and acceptability for formative assessment. There are two versions: the Basic tool is for use with students who have little clinical teamwork experience and lists 11 observable behaviours under two headings: ‘shared decision making’ and ‘working in a team’. The Advanced version is for senior students and junior health professionals and has 10 observable behaviours under four headings: ‘shared decision making’, ‘working in a team’, ‘leadership’, and ‘patient safety’. Both versions include a comprehensive scale and item descriptors. Further testing is required to focus on its validity and educational impact.
    • Introducing the LEADER Framework for Careers (1.0)

      Neary, Siobhan; Hooley, Tristram; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (2016-10)
      The LEADER Framework for Careers sets out five main areas that all citizens should attend to as they develop their careers: personal effectiveness; managing relationships; finding and accessing work; managing life and career; and understanding the world. Under each of these five areas the framework details a series of career management skills. These career management skills provide tools for educators to focus their curriculum, for counsellors to shape their interactions with clients and for policy makers in considering what programmes to fund or promote. The LEADER Framework for Careers has been developed by the LEarning And Decision making Resources (LEADER) project. This Erasmus + project has been established to support lifelong learning guidance services to help individuals to develop career management skills. Career Management Skills (CMS) is the term used to describe the skills, attributes, attitudes and knowledge that individuals require in order to manage their career. The project has been undertaken by a consortium of European organisations drawn from Italy, Spain, Romania, Greece, Turkey and the UK.
    • Introduction: Hard times? Building and sustaining research capacity in UK universities

      Hooley, Tristram; Williams, Sara; Kent, Raymond; University of Derby (Arma, 2010)
    • Is everyone a Socrates now? A critical look at critical thinking

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Routledge, 2016-08)
      You cannot choose to be critical or teach people to be critical unless you engage in conversation, a deep public conversation that requires considerable knowledge and understanding. In today's therapeutic culture, critical thinking skills and a variety of 'critical' approaches and theories appear to offer the possibility of 'becoming critical' when what they really offer is intellectual and moral conformism through therapy. The only solution is to abandon the therapy of 'critical thinking' and to 'learn and propagate the best that is known and thought in the world' and 'critical thinking' will take care of itself.
    • Is it time to rethink the 'university'?

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Conway Hall Ethical Society, 2017-03)
      Jeremiads abound on the ‘end’ or the ‘death’ of modern universities. There are claims that they are been severely compromised by ‘neoliberalism’ and social changes and left behind by technological advances. An increasing number of writers believe the university has been transformed turned into ‘safe spaces’, an extended school environment, that infantilises students. Many people describe this ‘crisis’ in academia but few offer any visions of the future and fewer still try to propose alternatives. This is an essay based upon a 'Thinking on Sunday' lecture given to the Conway Hall Ethical Society at Conway Hall, London on Sunday 4 December 2016.
    • Issues, applications and outcomes in interprofessional education

      Forman, Dawn; University of Derby (MedKnow Publications, 2014-04)
      In this issue, we are very pleased to present six articles, each of which has a strong interprofessional theme and which, we believe, collectively provide a flavor of the diversity of interprofessional community-oriented education, practice and research activity occurring internationally.
    • “It’s all about work”: New times, Post-Fordism and vocational pedagogy

      Avis, James; University of Huddersfield (Routledge, 2018-02-12)