• Early childhood studies: Principles and practice, 2nd ed.

      Johnston, Jane; Nahmad-Williams, Lindy; Wood, Val; Oates, Ruby; Bishop Grosseteste University; Sheffield Hallam University; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-02-12)
      This fully updated new edition offers a comprehensive, accessible, yet rigorous introduction to the study of Early Childhood that will will add value to any Early Childhood Studies course at both foundation and degree level. Addressing both care and education in the Early Years, the book considers a range of multi-disciplinary aspects of Early Childhood; including health, social, educational, psychological and sociological perspectives.
    • Early education

      Simmons, Helen; Nahmad-Williams, Lindy; University of Derby; Sheffield Hallam University (Routledge, 2018-02-12)
    • The early years professional

      Johnston, Jane; Boldrin, Jenny; Oates, Ruby; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-02-16)
    • Earth, water, air: Children meaning making: Using ceramics to give form to children’s ideas

      Yates, Ellen; Szenasi, Judith; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-04-03)
      This research project involved 120 young children aged 5-7 years old in ceramic workshops creating individual artefacts to form a final exhibition piece. The exhibition was curated by an internationally recognised ceramic artist and exhibited in an historic building in a disadvantaged inner city location to encourage social inclusion and access to the arts by the local community. Inspiration was taken from a permanent ceramic window exhibition at Royal Crown Derby Museum, completed by the artist during a residency in 2000. Royal Crown Derby have been producing bone china ceramics since 1750 and are currently one of the original factories still producing bone china in Britain. The children took inspiration from the ceramic window installation and artefacts within the museum for their designs through observations, drawings and photos. Further inspiration was gained from visits to Arboretum Park, the first publicly owned, landscaped, recreational park in England, opened in 1840 using donated land by Joseph Strutt. The project included children from the local community with a history of exclusion and isolation from cultural institutions and local heritage. The aim of the project was therefore to bring together children, community, local business and cultural institutions and university students through engagement in a collaborative arts project to facilitate access to Royal Crown Derby museum and other cultural institutions. The project gave value to children’s own ideas and supported their creativity, identity and agency. Early findings indicate that barriers exist within the UK education system which mitigate against children’s full participation in the arts and cultural activities, including time constraints due to curriculum pressure and expected outcomes. The location of the exhibition encouraged public reconsideration of the value and placing of children’s art by challenging the idea of separate spaces for the display of adults and children products.
    • Education as a catalyst for the social inclusion of people with learning disabilities

      Robinson, Deborah; Codina, Geraldene; Strogilos, Vasilis; Dimitrellou, Eleni; University of Derby; University of Southampton (Wiley, 2021-11-15)
      Our editorial for this special issue on ‘Education as a catalyst for social inclusion’ is divided into two sections. The first section focuses on the gaps in applied research in learning disability that this issue attempts to address. The second section outlines how each of the articles in this issue broadens our understanding of how education may catalyse (or sometimes restrict) social inclusion. These articles combine to enrich the data and debate available to people with learning disabilities, their families and advocates, policy makers and professional leaders about how to strengthen education’s capacity to enrich social inclusion.
    • Education, citizenship, and Cuban identity

      Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Palgrave Macmillan., 29/07/2016)
      This book explores how Cuba’s famously successful and inclusive education system has formed young Cubans’ political, social, and moral identities in a country transfigured by new inequalities and moral compromises made in the name of survival. The author examines this educational experience from the perspective of those who grew up in the years of economic crisis following the fall of the Soviet Union, charting their ideals, their frustrations and their struggle to reconcile revolutionary rhetoric with twenty-first century reality.
    • Education, ethics and experience: essays in honour of Richard Pring

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2016)
    • Effective employer mentoring: Lessons from the evidence

      Hooley, Tristram; The Careers & Enterprise Company; University of Derby (The Careers & Enterprise Company, 2016-07)
      The paper draws together academic and ‘grey’ literature (such as policy papers, speeches and programme evaluation reports), with the aim of, first, clarifying the impacts that might be anticipated from employer mentoring and, second, exploring what knowledge exists about effective practice. It makes use of an unpublished review undertaken by the Department for Education as well as a number of other literature reviews and meta-analyses. The evidence base identifies five key areas which a successful mentoring programme should focus on. (1) Programme design; (2) Recruitment and screening; (3) Matching; (4) Orientation, guidance and training; (5) Support and supervision; (6) Closure.
    • Effective personal tutoring in higher education

      Walker, Ben; University of Lincoln (Critical publishing, 2018-10-08)
      This is an important new text for all academic and professional staff within higher education (HE) who have a personal tutoring, student support or advising role. It examines key topics in relation to tutoring including definitions, coaching, core values and skills, boundaries, monitoring students, undertaking group and individual tutorials and the need to measure impact. Throughout, the text encourages reflection and the need to think critically about the role of the personal tutor. A scholarly and practical text, it comprehensively brings together relevant academic literature to inform tutoring practice as well as contextualising the role within the HE policy and quality assurance landscape.
    • Effective Policy Frameworks for the Organisation of Career Guidance Services A Review of the Literature

      Hooley, Tristram; Neary, Siobhan; Morris, Marian; Mackay, Susan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) and SQW (2015)
      This paper focuses on how public policy shapes career guidance and establishes a system within which individuals can access career support. Governments are critical to career guidance primarily as funders of the activity, but also importantly as regulators, coordinators and agents of system change. The paper looks at the evidence base on career guidance and public policy, explore the rationales for public policy involvement in the field, examine different models and systems and explore some key issues that underpin successful system design.
    • El enfoque mosaico, derecho a la participación y la voz de los niños en investigación educativa

      Delgado-Fuentes, Marco Antonio; University of Derby (Universidad CESMAG, 2020-06-11)
      This review article explores and discusses some of the methodological in-novations regarding childhood and education by focusing on the mosaic approach. It is a methodological approach -not constituted as a method yet- which has been mainly developed in English and it is founded on concepts such as those of qualitative research, childhood studies, the rights of the child and particularly, their right to participate in research about themselves and their world. A historical framework is presented to facilitate the understanding of the multidisciplinary origins of this approach. The process of the literature review was made in a database that contained 71 million references, out of which 28 references, which identified the mosaic approach as their method, were selected. The analysis of this approach presents a diverse panorama in its use, although it mainly focuses on preschool and early education. To conclude, a reflection about the use of this approach in the future is made and, particularly in Latin America where the incipient use of the mosaic approach seems to be relevant.
    • Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery: self-actualisation, social justice and the politics of career guidance

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2015-10)
      This paper is an extended text of Tristram Hooley’s inaugural lecture: Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery: self- actualisation, social justice and the politics of career education. The lecture was given on the 17th September 2015 at the University of Derby. The lecture explores the interrelationship between politics, social justice and career guidance. The paper argues that our careers emerge out of social and economic conditions. In unequal societies our position within the economic and social system is central to our chance of having a successful career and realising our potential (self-actualising). The lecture explores the role that career education and guidance can have in supporting individuals to self-actualise and notes that career education and guidance is in itself embedded in social, economic and political relationships. The ideal of the lifelong guidance system is advanced and it is argued that this could be part of a new kind of society. A society in which a lifelong guidance system was realised could be more socially justand would signal a new kind of relationship between paid work, citizenship and leisure. The lecture concludes with a consideration of the role that career education can play in bringing about a new kind of society. The paper proposes a pedagogic framework for a radical career education and guidance. This framework argues that radical career education and guidance should be seeking tohelp us to: (1) explore ourselves and the world where we live, learn and work; (2) examine how our experience connects to broader historical, political and social systems; (3) develop strategies that allow us individually to make the most of our current situation; (4) develop strategies that allow us collectively to make the most of our current situations; and (5) consider how the current situation and structures should be changed.
    • Emerging apprenticeship practitioner roles in England: conceptualising the subaltern educator

      Esmond, Bill; University of Derby (Springer, 2019-10-26)
      TVET educator roles and identities vary internationally, and are subject to repositioning, for example as the relative significance of institutions and the workplace change within national systems. In English apprenticeships, a key position has long been occupied by competence assessors, whose non-teaching role has related uneasily to those of professional educators. Following the introduction of new apprenticeship standards, former assessors are increasingly being allocated training responsibilities, raising issues about the expertise, identities and professional formation both of these emerging practitioners and of vocational educators in general. A qualitative study of assessors who have assumed greater training responsibilities examined these issues through individual and small-group interviews. Participant accounts of diverse and contested practices and environments suggested a need to conceptualise their roles in ways that draw upon but go beyond accounts of professionalism and occupational expertise developed at earlier stages. Drawing on Gramsci, the concept of the subaltern educator is put forward to characterise the complex position of these staff in the current climate of further education, the need for enhanced, rather than diminished, professional formation and wider possibilities for professional enhancement at a time of uncertainty for all vocational educators.
    • The emerging practitioner

      Yates, Ellen; Appleby, Michelle (Routledge, 2014)
      The Student Practitioner in Early Childhood Studies: An essential guide to working with children provides accessible support and guidance for Early Childhood Studies students in higher education who may have little, if any, experience of relating to young children in the Early Years Foundation Stage and Key Stage One.
    • Emotion dysregulation and loneliness as predictors of food addiction

      Tatsi, Eirini; Kamal, Atiya; Turvill, Alistair; Regina, Holler; University of West London; Birmingham City University; Universtiy of Derby; Aston University (SIPISS-FerrariSinibaldi, 2019-01-01)
      Introduction: This study aimed to investigate whether multiple aspects of emotion dysregulation contribute to the etiology of Food Addiction (FA); as well as to provide further evidence and clarity regarding the role of loneliness on the development of addictive behaviour towards food.Methods: A correlational study was employed to assess associations within 162 participants which were recruited via online forums on FA and student population. The Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS), Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), and UCLA Loneliness Scale, and a demographic and personal information questionnaire were all completed online. A Poisson regression analysis was carried out and statistical significance was set at P <0.05.Results: 79% of the sample endorsed a persistent desire or repeated unsuccessful attempts to cut down or control their use of highly processed foods, while 21% met diagnostic criteria for food addiction. Poisson regression analysis demonstrated that the model predicts food addiction (P <0.001). Specifically, food addiction symptom count was positively predicted by difficulty engaging in goal-directed behaviour, impulse control difficulties, lack of emotional awareness and limited access to emotion regulation strategies (P <0.05); DERS total, nonacceptance of emotional responses and lack of emotional clarity were not significant predictors. Loneliness positively predicted food addiction (P =0.002).Discussion and Conclusions: The findings of this research provide further evidence on the etiology of food addiction, as multiple aspects of emotion dysregulation, including difficulty in engaging in goal-directed behaviour, impulsiveness, emotional awareness and limited access to emotion regulation strategies, and loneliness were found to influence the development of an addictive behaviour towards certain types of food. Future research will need to understand possible causality between these factors and insights into the potential role addictive behaviour of food has in overeating phenomena, such as binge-eating.
    • Employability: A review of the literature 2012-2016

      Artess, Jane; Mellors-Bourne, Robin; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Higher Education Academy (HEA), 2017)
      This report, commissioned of the University of Derby, examines 187 pieces of research published between 2012 and 2016. It describes how the subject of employability has been addressed during this period and draws out some of the key implications for higher education providers (HEPs), academics and employability practitioners.
    • Engaging Leaders: The challenge of inspiring collective commitment in universities

      Gentle, Paul; Forman, Dawn; University of Derby (Routledge, 2014)
      Addressing the question of how leadership can work most successfully in universities, Engaging Leaders strengthens the sense of shared professional knowledge and capability amongst leaders in higher education. Presenting a narrative of change which not only spells out why universities need to work differently, this book also takes the reader through clear practical steps which any practising leader can take in order to build a collaborative professional culture which supports and challenges all members of an academic community.
    • Engaging the local community in cultural heritage through a children’s ceramic arts exhibition

      Yates, Ellen; Szenasi, Judith; University of Derby (Peter Lang, 2021)
      This chapter describes a research project which aimed to increase social inclusion and access to the arts and cultural heritage, through a children’s ceramic arts exhibition. The exhibition was curated by an internationally recognised ceramic artist and located in an historic building within an inner city park in Derby, England, behind a culturally historic ceramics factory and museum. The project further aimed to reposition children as artists and heritage makers by valuing their ideas, creativity, identity and agency. Data was collected through interviews and through comments from the exhibition visitor’s book. Findings indicate that barriers exist within the UK education system which limit children’s full participation in the arts and cultural activities. The exhibition encouraged social inclusion and contested the idea of separate spaces for the display of adults and children products, but most significantly, children were repositioned as active agents in the construction of their cultural heritage.
    • Ensuring quality in online career mentoring

      Hooley, Tristram; Neary, Siobhan; Hutchinson, Jo; University of Derby (2015)
      This article explores the issue of quality in online career mentoring. It builds on a previous evaluation of Brightside, an online mentoring system in the UK which is primarily aimed at supporting young people's transitions to further learning. The article notes that participants in Brightside's mentoring programmes reported satisfaction with their experiences, with many stating that it helped them to make decisions and to positively change their learning and career behaviours. However, the article argues that there are challenges in ensuring quality and consistency connected to both the voluntary nature of mentoring and the online mode. The article proposes a 10-point quality framework to support quality assurance, initial training and professional development for online mentors.
    • An evalaution of BookTrust additional needs resources

      Robinson, Deborah; Moore, Nicki; Parker, Gordon; University of Derby (Institute of Education, University of Derby, 2016)
      This report explores reading for pleasure among children with special educational needs through an evaluation of BookTrust's additional needs resources.