• The Dangerous Rise of Therapeutic Education

      Hayes, Dennis; Ecclestone, Kathryn; University of Derby; University of Sheffield (Routledge Education Classic Editions, 2019-02-07)
      The Dangerous Rise of Therapeutic Education confronts the silent ascendancy of a therapeutic ethos across the educational system and into the workplace. Controversial and compelling, Kathryn Ecclestone and Dennis Hayes’ classic text uses a wealth of examples across the education system, from primary schools to university and the workplace, to show how therapeutic education is turning children, young people and adults into anxious and self-preoccupied individuals rather than aspiring, optimistic and resilient learners who want to know everything about the world. Remaining extremely topical, the chapters illuminate the powerful effects of therapeutic education, including: How therapeutic learning is taking shape, now and in the future How therapeutic ideas from popular culture have come to govern social thought and policies How the fostering of dependence and compulsory participation in therapeutic activities that encourage the disclosing of emotions, can undermine parents’ and teachers’ confidence and authority How therapeutic forms of teacher training undermine faith in the pursuit of knowledge How political initiatives in emotional literacy, emotional wellbeing and ‘positive mental health’ propagate a diminished view of human potential throughout the education system and the workplace. The Dangerous Rise of Therapeutic Education is an eye-opening read for every teacher and leader across the field of education, and every parent and student, who is passionate about the power of knowledge to transform people’s lives. It is a call for a debate about the growing impact of therapeutic education and what it means for learning now and in the future.
    • Dealing with the ever changing policy landscape: Learning from international practice

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Career Development Association of New Zealand, 2016)
    • A defining moment in personal tutoring: reflections on personal tutoring definitions and their implications

      Walker, Ben; University of Lincoln (University of Lincoln, 2018)
      Despite personal tutoring being a highly important area, it has a contested nature. One contention concerns its definition: in simple terms, what personal tutoring is and, by extension, what effective personal tutoring is. A book on personal tutoring (Stork and Walker, 2015) I co-authored entitled Becoming an Outstanding Personal Tutor - which aims to define the role of the personal tutor in further education as well as explain and demonstrate how to carry out the role effectively) - raises a number of questions to be explored further. These have been brought into sharper focus by both my journey from further to higher education and as a result of my ‘practical’ role as a manager of personal tutoring. The most urgent of these questions are centred on the theme of definition. What alternative definitions are out there? Are single definitions sufficient for the complexity of tutoring? When it comes to personal tutoring, what constitutes a definition anyway? The urgency stems from the increased importance placed on personal tutoring resulting from contextual developments and as shown from the findings of key research reports on the retention and success of students. Similarly, if there is a broad consensus that personal tutoring is vital, then further debate around what it stands for, and should stand for, in terms of good practice, needs to take place. Informed by critical pedagogy, this article will consider these questions of definition and the potential implications for organisations, those undertaking the role and students.
    • Developing a new generation of careers leaders: An evaluation of the Teach First Careers and Employability Initiative

      Hooley, Tristram; Dodd, Vanessa; Shepherd, Claire; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2016)
    • Developing a new generation of careers leaders: Executive summary

      Hooley, Tristram; Dodd, Vanessa; Shepherd, Claire; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2016)
    • Developing an identity as an EdD leader: A reflexive narrative account.

      Tupling, Claire; Outhwaite, Deborah Emily; University of Derby; University of Warwick (Sage, 2017-11-22)
      This article considers the challenges encountered by a recently appointed assistant programme leader in establishing an identity as a leader of an EdD programme. In discussing literature on the development of the EdD, the article recognizes an existing concern with student identity but highlights a need to consider the development of the EdD leader’s identity as a leader. Employing a reflexive narrative, the article emphasizes the centrality of the leader’s disabled identity in considering the role of assistant programme leader and thus becoming a leader. The EdD is identified as a social space where colleagues are often engaged in their professional learning with the EdD leadership team providing support. This article tracks some of the commonplace behaviours around such learning in a post-1992 institution, and discusses the implications for EdD leadership and management teams when trying to consider and implement changes to established organizational cultures.
    • Developing creativity in early childhood studies students

      Yates, Ellen; Twigg, Emma (Elsevier, 2017-03)
      The study aimed to identify first year BA (Hons) Early Childhood Studies students' perceptions of and confidence in, their own creativity, in an East Midlands university in the United Kingdom and to inform the teaching of a first year Play and Creativity module at the same institution. The Play and Creativity Module makes use of the democratic definition of creativity (NACCCE, 1999) and Jeffrey and Woods (2003) concept of teaching for creativity by encouraging students to engage in practical activities to develop skills and confidence in their own capabilities. Though there is plenty of research which explores these ideas within the field of early childhood there is less research which focuses on best practice in Higher Education. The study identified a clear improvement in students confidence in their own creativity and their confidence to implement the activities experienced in the module sessions within their own practice. Students developed a deeper understanding of the concept of little creativity (Craft, 2002) and the democratic definition of creativity (NACCCE, 1999) and recognised the importance of providing a wide range of opportunities and resources for children to develop creativity. The practical activities within the module also supported students professional skills such as team working, listening to others and the importance of collaboration and reflection on practice. In addition, the practical and procedural elements of practice how to do with children was identified as being an area which was illuminated by completing the module and contributed to professional practice.
    • Developing creativity in early childhood studies students.

      Yates, Ellen; Twigg, Emma; University of Derby (2016)
      The study aimed to identify Early Childhood Studies students’ perceptions of, and confidence in, their own creativity, in an East Midlands university in England; and the influence of practical, creative activities on their practice with children. The study was qualitative in nature, framed within the interpretative paradigm and based on a first year Play and Creativity module which includes practical creative activity and the development of skills to enhance confidence. The key role of the practitioner in supporting children’s creativity has been highlighted (Craft 2002, Wright 2010) alongside the need for skills and confidence in practitioners. (Aubrey and Dahl 2013, Chien and Hui 2010) A study group of 25 was opportunity sampled from the full cohort of 90. Students completed questionnaires at the beginning and end of the module, alongside self- reflection sheets after five practical activities. Results were coded and analysed thematically. The study complied with the institution’s ethical procedures and participation was voluntary. Students were free to withdraw at any point. The results indicated improvement in students’ confidence in their own creativity and their ability to apply the skills developed within their practice. Students developed a wider understanding of the nature of creativity, including the importance of the environment, resources and opportunities for children to explore . The module supported students’ professional skills, including, team working, listening skills, collaboration and the importance of reflection on practice. The study concluded that practical activities within the module should continue to form part of the Early Childhood Studies Degree programme.
    • Developing ethical geography students? The impact and effectiveness of a tutorial-based approach

      Healey, Ruth L.; Ribchester, Chris; University of Chester (Informa UK Limited, 2016-02-17)
      This paper explores the effectiveness of a tutorial based approach in supporting the development of geography undergraduates’ ethical thinking. It was found that overall the intervention had a statistically significant impact on students’ ethical thinking scores as assessed using Clarkeburn et al.’s (2003) Meta-Ethical Questionnaire (MEQ). The initiative led to a convergence of scores, having a bigger impact on those who had a relatively low score prior to the intervention. Interestingly the approach had the biggest impact on students who self-identified as physical geographers. Unlike some previous research there was little evidence of difference between male and female students.
    • Developing your career: harnessing the power of the internet for “digital career management”

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Emerald, 2017)
      Purpose This paper aims to discuss the role of the internet in framing individual’s career building. It argues that the 7 Cs of digital career literacy offer a useful framework for those working in learning and development in organizations. Every individual needs to engage with the internet when thinking about how to manage and future-proof their careers. Learning and development (L&D) professionals can support employees to harness the power of the internet and learn how to make use of the new opportunities of “digital career management”. Design/methodology/approach This paper highlights steps that every individual needs to take for “digital career management” and pulls out the role of L&D professionals in addressing the developing internet context. Findings Sets out “7 C’s” for proactively managing a “digital career profile”. Originality/value The internet has shifted the context for career building and learning how to maximize the opportunities now offered is the central task for anyone wishing to carve out their future careers.
    • Documenting an educational imaginary – representations of schooling in British documentary films.

      Tupling, Claire; University of Derby (Либра Скорп (Libra Scorp), 2018-09-26)
    • Early childhood studies: Principles and practice, 2nd ed.

      Johnston, Jane; Nahmad-Williams, Lindy; Wood, Val; Oates, Ruby; Bishop Grosseteste University; Sheffield Hallam University; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-02-12)
      This fully updated new edition offers a comprehensive, accessible, yet rigorous introduction to the study of Early Childhood that will will add value to any Early Childhood Studies course at both foundation and degree level. Addressing both care and education in the Early Years, the book considers a range of multi-disciplinary aspects of Early Childhood; including health, social, educational, psychological and sociological perspectives.
    • Early education

      Simmons, Helen; Nahmad-Williams, Lindy; University of Derby; Sheffield Hallam University (Routledge, 2018-02-12)
    • The early years professional

      Johnston, Jane; Boldrin, Jenny; Oates, Ruby; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-02-16)
    • Earth, water, air: Children meaning making: Using ceramics to give form to children’s ideas

      Yates, Ellen; Szenasi, Judith; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-04-03)
      This research project involved 120 young children aged 5-7 years old in ceramic workshops creating individual artefacts to form a final exhibition piece. The exhibition was curated by an internationally recognised ceramic artist and exhibited in an historic building in a disadvantaged inner city location to encourage social inclusion and access to the arts by the local community. Inspiration was taken from a permanent ceramic window exhibition at Royal Crown Derby Museum, completed by the artist during a residency in 2000. Royal Crown Derby have been producing bone china ceramics since 1750 and are currently one of the original factories still producing bone china in Britain. The children took inspiration from the ceramic window installation and artefacts within the museum for their designs through observations, drawings and photos. Further inspiration was gained from visits to Arboretum Park, the first publicly owned, landscaped, recreational park in England, opened in 1840 using donated land by Joseph Strutt. The project included children from the local community with a history of exclusion and isolation from cultural institutions and local heritage. The aim of the project was therefore to bring together children, community, local business and cultural institutions and university students through engagement in a collaborative arts project to facilitate access to Royal Crown Derby museum and other cultural institutions. The project gave value to children’s own ideas and supported their creativity, identity and agency. Early findings indicate that barriers exist within the UK education system which mitigate against children’s full participation in the arts and cultural activities, including time constraints due to curriculum pressure and expected outcomes. The location of the exhibition encouraged public reconsideration of the value and placing of children’s art by challenging the idea of separate spaces for the display of adults and children products.
    • Education as a catalyst for the social inclusion of people with learning disabilities

      Robinson, Deborah; Codina, Geraldene; Strogilos, Vasilis; Dimitrellou, Eleni; University of Derby; University of Southampton (Wiley, 2021-11-15)
      Our editorial for this special issue on ‘Education as a catalyst for social inclusion’ is divided into two sections. The first section focuses on the gaps in applied research in learning disability that this issue attempts to address. The second section outlines how each of the articles in this issue broadens our understanding of how education may catalyse (or sometimes restrict) social inclusion. These articles combine to enrich the data and debate available to people with learning disabilities, their families and advocates, policy makers and professional leaders about how to strengthen education’s capacity to enrich social inclusion.
    • Education, citizenship, and Cuban identity

      Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Palgrave Macmillan., 29/07/2016)
      This book explores how Cuba’s famously successful and inclusive education system has formed young Cubans’ political, social, and moral identities in a country transfigured by new inequalities and moral compromises made in the name of survival. The author examines this educational experience from the perspective of those who grew up in the years of economic crisis following the fall of the Soviet Union, charting their ideals, their frustrations and their struggle to reconcile revolutionary rhetoric with twenty-first century reality.
    • Education, ethics and experience: essays in honour of Richard Pring

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2016)
    • Effective employer mentoring: Lessons from the evidence

      Hooley, Tristram; The Careers & Enterprise Company; University of Derby (The Careers & Enterprise Company, 2016-07)
      The paper draws together academic and ‘grey’ literature (such as policy papers, speeches and programme evaluation reports), with the aim of, first, clarifying the impacts that might be anticipated from employer mentoring and, second, exploring what knowledge exists about effective practice. It makes use of an unpublished review undertaken by the Department for Education as well as a number of other literature reviews and meta-analyses. The evidence base identifies five key areas which a successful mentoring programme should focus on. (1) Programme design; (2) Recruitment and screening; (3) Matching; (4) Orientation, guidance and training; (5) Support and supervision; (6) Closure.