• Can’t spell, can’t teach? An exploration of stakeholder attitudes towards those with dyslexia, training to be primary classroom teachers

      Charles, Sarah; University of Derby (2017-05-12)
      Aim: This paper seeks to investigate whether the dominance of a standards drive approach to ITE, and the teaching profession, has perpetuated attitudinal barriers to the recruitment and employment of students with dyslexia. Stakeholder understanding of the term dyslexia; perceived strengths/challenges those with dyslexia bring to the profession; what constitutes as reasonable adjustments and employability prospects, based on disclosure, are explored. Content: The presentation will disseminate and discuss key findings related to ITE stakeholder attitudes towards those with dyslexia, training to be primary teachers on ITE programmes. Findings suggest that there remains uncertainty and confusion about dyslexia, its associated characteristics/causes. Many stakeholders perceive dyslexia negatively, couched in deficits rather than difference. This research found strengths such as empathy, inclusive practice and ease of identification of children with dyslexia are attributed to those training to teach with dyslexia. Stakeholder concerns, of those entering the profession, with dyslexia, are identified as being– ability to cope with the demands of the profession; the inability to teach particular age groups/subjects; the level of support needed to ensure success and retention following qualification. This latter concern constitutes a key finding of this research, as the level of support afforded by universities is perceived as being unrealistic in the workplace. The notion of what constitutes ‘reasonable adjustments’ is questioned by many ITE stakeholders. A number of ‘reasonable adjustments’ are perceived by stakeholders as being unreasonable within the teaching profession due to the professional roles, responsibilities and requirements of being a teaching professional. Furthermore, uncertainty exists as to how schools can actually support those with dyslexia, in light of professional standards. A significant majority of stakeholders demonstrated a negative attitude towards the notion of people with dyslexia entering the teaching profession, believing that parents should be concerned if their child is being taught by someone with dyslexia. Both of these findings could have serious implications on the future disclosure of those with dyslexia. This research has found that a fear of stigmatisation and potential discrimination, which deter those with dyslexia from disclosing on course and job applications are justified and real. This research concludes that employability chances are lessened upon disclosure of dyslexia. This presentation will seek to engage the audience to consider their own understanding of dyslexia; their institutional policies regarding disclosure, support and training in light of equality legislation and, ultimately, their own attitudes towards the suitability of those with dyslexia studying on, ITE programmes. Thinking deeply about teacher education: This is a thought provoking presentation which encourages the audience to think carefully about those with dyslexia on ITE programmes, and the potential professional, legal, ethical and moral tensions due to concerns that; “The drive for high literacy standards will be compromised if teachers with ‘weaker’ literacy standards are employed” (Riddick, 2003, p.390). The country/ies to which the presentation relates: This presentation has scope and relevance to all countries where there is incidence of dyslexia and where students are required to meet professional standards to enter the teaching profession.
    • Care of the person with dementia : interprofessional practice and education

      Forman, Dawn; Pond, Dimity; University of Derby; Newcastle University Australia (Cambridge University Press, 2015-11)
      Care of the Person with Dementia responds to the urgent need for health practitioners to take an innovative approach to the challenge of dementia. The first Australian text of its kind, it combines evidence-based resources with interprofessional education and practice, exploring the ethical, social and environmental repercussions of dementia to provide a comprehensive overview of dementia care in an Australian context. The text is structured around a model of interprofessional education and practice (IPE) tailored to dementia care. This model incorporates the context of care, an important element missing from other recognised models of IPE. Throughout the book, principles of IPE are explained within the context of dementia, drawing on exemplars from a body of current, well-researched and evaluated dementia practice. Written by experienced academics, and providing national and international perspectives, this is a unique and crucial resource to develop collaborative skills and professional knowledge in the management of dementia.
    • Career development training, certification, supervision and professionalization: case examples from four countries.

      Neault, Roberta; Artess, Jane; Tien, Hsiu-Lan Shelley; Hopkins, Sareena; Arulmani, Gideon; University of Derby (Indian Association of Career and Livelihood Planning (IACLP), 2016-12)
      The career development sector is professionalizing internationally, through training, certifications, and an abundance of opportunities to learn from colleagues at conferences and international symposia. However, there are significant differences in how the profession is developing in different parts of the world; the notion of “career” is recognized as culturebound and, perhaps, inconceivable to many individuals. In this paper, career development educators from four countries in Asia, North America, and Europe share case examples of the career development sector’s evolution in their regions. Together, they represent institutions and training programs from the public and private sectors, in both formal and informal settings. Several of the authors have been influential in introducing and customizing career development practitioner competency frameworks and training for practitioners from diverse backgrounds to meet certification requirements. Together they examine how professionalizing the delivery of career development services has emerged in their regions, the variety of training opportunities available along a continuum from preparation for practice to reflection of practice, the diversity of standards and certifications in the career development sector, and the early stages of addressing the need for training and equipping supervisors and leaders. The authors advocate a “both/and” approach to professionalization, grounded in local research that surfaces felt needs and then customizing training, resources, and standards that incorporate relevant elements from international sources
    • Career guidance for social justice

      Hooley, Tristram; Sultana, Ronald G.; University of Derby (National Institute for Career Education and Counselling (NICEC) and CDI, 2016-04)
      This editorial sets the context for issue 36 of the NICEC journal which is focused on social justice and career guidance. The editorial explores the key themes of the issue highlighting the social justice tradition within the career guidance field and making the case for a strong focus on social justice. However the editorial also highlights the tensions that exist between career guidance’s orientation to the individual and understandings of social justice which are more socially orientated. The editorial concludes by arguing that if career guidance is to formulate a meaningful response to social injustice it needs to draw on diverse theoretical traditions and stimulate new forms of practice.
    • Career guidance in communities

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2014)
      Career guidance in communities, by Rie Thomsen, Aarhus, Denmark, Aarhus University Press, 2012, 256 pp., £34.78 (paperback), ISBN 9788771240122 Reviewed by Tristram Hooley, Reader in Career Development, University of Derby, UK. Email: T.Hooley@derby.ac.uk
    • Careers coaching for social justice: the case of school leadership and inclusive education for children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities

      Robinson, Deborah; Codina, Geraldene; Jill, Hanson; Eleni, Dimitrellou; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2020-12-18)
      This paper focusses on emancipatory careers coaching for social justice and proposes a practical tool for use with school leaders who are working to improve the inclusiveness of their schools. It draws on a study of 75 school leaders working on a programme of peer review in a city in England. The programme was named the Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) Peer Challenge Programme and through it, participants worked collaboratively to evaluate and improve the quality of inclusive practice in the City’s mainstream (ordinary) schools. The study used inductive qualitative content analysis (QCA) to form a coding agenda which was then applied to a deductive analysis of 24 SEND Peer Challenge school reports. These reports were collaboratively produced by leaders engaged in the SEND Peer Challenge Programme to summarise the outcomes of the process. Following final QCA reduction, the research identified six value constructs that were live and relevant for school leaders in the City related to collectivism, collaboration and mutuality. These value constructs are also live in the field of inclusive education more widely. Drawing on the six value constructs, we propose practical strategies for emancipatory careers coaching. These strategies can be applied by individuals who provide careers coaching for school leaders engaged in the process of school improvement for SEND and inclusion.
    • Challenges to implementing a new technology in Teacher Education. Phase One: ‘meaningful’ digital reflections.

      Byrd, Jo; University of Derby (University of Cumbria, 2017)
      This paper describes the challenges of introducing a digital tool to trainee teachers. A group of nineteen undergraduate students studying primary education and in their third year of a four year course was introduced to PebblePad5. PebblePad is an online tool which is not new in the world of ITE. However, the latest version has more useful features and is less ‘clunky’ than older versions. The students each had their own private account where eventually they would be expected to store all of their placement files, add multi-modal content and then choose to share some or all of this content publically or by personal invitation via email. One of the benefits for us as an ITE provider is that we can view our students’ files electronically and comment on them without necessarily making the one/two hour round trip to the placement school. Although students used some technology, this research shows that students need more training in using technology competently in the workplace setting. Phase One of the project was to encourage the students to write their reflections on placement digitally. It was hoped that the students would be enthusiastic about using PebblePad and I would see an improvement in the levels of engagement with the reflective process and thus, the quality of teaching and learning as a result of this. Data obtained from questionnaires and a focus group indicate that PebblePad was viewed as a useful tool, but training issues and time constraints of the project meant it was not as successful for this cohort as was hoped. This paper discusses the issues that arose and the plan to overcome these barriers in the next phase of the implementation of PebblePad.
    • Changing employer practices in graduate recruitment: implications for career development

      Hirsh, Wendy; Pollard, Emma; Artess, Jane; HECSU (National Institute for Career Education and Counselling (NICEC), 2015-10)
      A major study of the changing graduate recruitment practices of UK employers, was conducted during 2014 by the Institute for Employment Studies (IES) and the Higher Education Careers Services Unit (HECSU) for the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS). It involved in-depth interviews with 76 employers (diverse by size and sector) and 30 'stakeholders' in graduate employment, including university careers services. The qualitative data were complemented by analysis of existing quantitative data on graduate employment and a wide ranging literature review. This article reports on selected findings relevant to career development professionals, including: the challenges for employers of attracting appropriate applicants; employers' generic skill needs and views on employability; the changing reasons and criteria for targeting specific higher education (HE) institutions; and employers' increasingly strategic use of work experience in graduate recruitment.
    • Cognitive development

      Johnston, Jane; Oates, Ruby; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-02-16)
    • Comfort radicalism and NEETs: a conservative praxis

      Avis, James; University of Huddersfield (Informa UK Limited, 2014-07-29)
      Young people who are not in education, employment or training (NEET) are construed by policy-makers as a pressing problem about which something should be done. Such young people’s lack of employment is thought to pose difficulties for wider society in relation to social cohesion and inclusion, and it is feared that they will become a ‘lost generation’. This paper draws upon English research, seeking to historicise the debate whilst acknowledging that these issues have a much wider purchase. The notion of NEETs rests alongside longstanding concerns of the English state and middle classes, addressing unruly male working-class youth as well as the moral turpitude of working class girls. Waged labour and domesticity are seen as a means to integrate such groups into society thereby generating social cohesion. The paper places the debate within it socio-economic context and draws on theorisations of cognitive capitalism, Italian workerism, as well as emerging theories of antiwork to analyse these. It concludes by arguing that ‘radical’ approaches to NEETs that point towards inequities embedded in the social structure and call for social democratic solutions veer towards a form of comfort radicalism. Such approaches leave in place the dominance of capitalist relations as well as productivist orientations that celebrate waged labour.
    • Competencies and frameworks in interprofessional education: A comparative analysis

      Thistlethwaite, Jill; Forman, Dawn; Matthews, Lynda; Rogers, Gary; Steketee, Carole; Yassine, Tagrid; University of Derby (Wolters Kluwer, 2014-06)
      Health professionals need preparation and support to work in collaborative practice teams, a requirement brought about by an aging population and increases in chronic and complex diseases. Therefore, health professions education has seen the introduction of interprofessional education (IPE) competency frameworks to provide a common lens through which disciplines can understand, describe, and implement team-based practices. Whilst an admirable aim, often this has resulted in more confusion with the introduction of varying definitions about similar constructs, particularly in relation to what IPE actually means.The authors explore the nature of the terms competency and framework, while critically appraising the concept of competency frameworks and competency-based education. They distinguish between competencies for health professions that are profession specific, those that are generic, and those that may be achieved only through IPE. Four IPE frameworks are compared to consider their similarities and differences, which ultimately influence how IPE is implemented. They are the Interprofessional Capability Framework (United Kingdom), the National Interprofessional Competency Framework (Canada), the Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice (United States), and the Curtin University Interprofessional Capability Framework (Australia).The authors highlight the need for further discussion about establishing a common language, strengthening ways in which academic environments work with practice environments, and improving the assessment of interprofessional competencies and teamwork, including the development of assessment tools for collaborative practice. They also argue that for IPE frameworks to be genuinely useful, they need to augment existing curricula by emphasizing outcomes that might be attained only through interprofessional activity
    • Conclusion: Education - what's the point

      O'Grady, Anne; Cottle, Vanessa; Nottingham Trent University; University of Derby (Routledge, 2016-08)
    • Consultancy project for NACRO Osmaston Family Project: Final report

      Appleby, Michelle; Oates, Ruby; Sanders, Andrew; Sedgwick, Robin; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2011)
    • Continental selections? Institutional actors and market mechanisms in post-16 education in England

      Esmond, Bill; Centre of Educational Research and Innovation, University of Derby (Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group), 2019-08-06)
      Recent policies for English technical and vocational education, centred on apprenticeship reforms and the Sainsbury Review, have prioritised employer-led curricula and learning in employment settings. These policies are represented in policy discourse as radical changes that imitate successful European systems, raising new issues about the possibilities and limitations of policy learning and policy borrowing. Useful insights are offered by comparative political economy, which has located skill formation within networks of complementary institutions that shape economic life, rendering problematic the notion of change in a single dimension such as skills. Relatedly, historical institutionalism explains skill formation both as an enduring institution but also as the product of specific historical conflicts over workplace training. Building on these theoretical conceptions, a series of qualitative case studies carried out at key points in the emergence of current skills policies is reviewed, which demonstrates how wider conflicts are reflected in a tension between selectivity and inclusion currently playing out in the implementation English skills policy. The findings indicate the possibility of further stratification in post-16 education, through the process that historical institutionalism describes as ‘layering’. However, possibilities for a more coherent relationship between educational practice and the workplace may also be derived from this analysis.
    • Creating a coaching culture for managers in your organisation

      Forman, Dawn; Joyce, Mary; McMahon, Gladeana; Univeristy of Derby (Routledge, 2013)
      Creating a Coaching Culture for Managers in your Organisation is for managers leaders and coaches interested in extending the practice of coaching to achieve broader organisational outcomes. The book offers a practical approach on how to use coaching strategically to create a culture that supports change, builds leadership capacity, and achieves a high degree of alignment between the goals and aspirations of organisations, and their staff.
    • The critically reflective and creative practitioner

      Yates, Ellen; University of Derby (Routledge, 2020-06-07)
      This chapter aims to explain what critical reflection is and how it can be applied to empower students and enable them to question habitual practice and contest some of the dominant discourses within early childhood. The professions that utilise critical reflection are ones that deal with people, where relationships and ethical judgements are required but may not always be simple. In order to practise critical reflection as a professional, it may be necessary to reflect personally and individually, but is usually more useful and effective if this is practised with others. The chapter explains what critical reflection is, outlined some models and critical theory and explained how these can be applied to our professional lives and supports us in scrutinising our professional practice. It explores what critical reflection is and what it might mean for early childhood students. The author explores some critical theories and concepts that assist with critical reflection and help us deconstruct our experiences.
    • Cuba: educationaliImpact of the Cuban revolution

      Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Bloomsbury, 31/10/2019)
      Education in Mexico, Central America and the Latin Caribbean examines the development and practice of education in México, Costa Rica, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panamá. The chapters, written by local experts, provide an overview of the structure, aims and purposes of education in each of these ten countries with very different socio-economic backgrounds. The authors present curriculum standards, pedagogy, evaluation, accountability and delivery, discussing both how the formal systems are structured and how they actually function. The volume explores the origins of proposed reforms and their implementation, emphasising the distinctiveness of each country and attempting to locate new practices that could lead to better education.Including a comparative introduction to the issues facing education in the region as a whole and guides to available online datasets, this book is an essential reference for researchers, scholars, international agencies and policy-makers.
    • A culture of youth: young people, youth organisations and mass participation in Cuba 1959-62.

      Luke, Anne; University of Derby (Paradigm/ Routledge, 2014-06-30)
    • Curriculum renewal for interprofessional education in health

      Dunston, Roger; Forman, Dawn; Rogers, Gary; Thistlethwaite, Jill; Yassine, Tagrid; Hager, Jane; Manidis, Maria; Rossiter, Chris; Curtin University (Office for Learning and Teaching Australia, 2014-01)
      In this preface we comment on four matters that we think bode well for the future of interprofessional education in Australia. First, there is a growing articulation, nationally and globally, as to the importance of interprofessional education and its contribution to the development of interprofessional and collaborative health practices. These practices are increasingly recognised as central to delivering effective, efficient, safe and sustainable health services. Second, there is a rapidly growing interest and institutional engagement with interprofessional education as part of pre-registration health professional education. This has changed substantially in recent years. Whilst beyond the scope of our current studies, the need for similar developments in continuing professional development (CPD) for health professionals was a consistent topic in our stakeholder consultations. Third, we observe what might be termed a threshold effect occurring in the area of interprofessional education. Projects that address matters relating to IPE are now far more numerous, visible and discussed in terms of their aggregate outcomes. The impact of this momentum is visible across the higher education sector. Finally, we believe that effective collaboration is a critical mediating process through which the rich resources of disciplinary knowledge and capability are joined to add value to existing health service provision. We trust the conceptual and practical contributions and resources presented and discussed in this report contribute to these developments.
    • Curriculum renewal in interprofessional education in health: establishing leadership and capacity

      Forman, Dawn; Dunston, Roger; Thistlethwaite, Jill; Moran, Monica Catherine; Steketee, Carole; University of Derby (Office for Learning and Teaching Australia, 2016)
      The Curriculum Renewal for Interprofessional Education in Health: ‘Establishing Leadership and Capacity’ (ELC) project builds from a number of Australian and global studies and reports that address a range of critical issues associated with the development of interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional practice (IPP) within Australia and globally2.