• Agency in the darkness: ‘fear of the unknown’, learning disability and teacher education for inclusion

      Robinson, Deborah; Goodey, Chris; University of Derby; University of Leicester; Institute of Education, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Centre for Medical Humanities, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2017-09-04)
      This paper proposes inclusion phobia as a sharper and more operative definition of the ‘fear of the unknown’ often cited as an explanation for resistance to inclusive education. Using ‘severe and profound learning disability’ as the paradigm case, we situate the phobia surrounding this label in its social and historical context. Our hypothesis is that resistance to inclusion for this group is not rational but amounts to a thought disorder in a psychiatric sense. Using qualitative case studies of pre-service teachers on practicum and head teachers engaged in decisions about admissions, we demonstrate the workings and impact of inclusion phobia. We illustrate its trajectory from a general social dysfunction, to the systems that channel it to the individuals caught up in it. Our aim is to expose inclusion phobia so that, teacher educators, teachers and pre-service teachers might, in knowing it, find new ways to remedy it. In doing so, long standing resistance to inclusive education is made more tractable. We conclude with our own proposals for an anti-phobic curriculum for teacher education.
    • Challenges to implementing a new technology in Teacher Education. Phase One: ‘meaningful’ digital reflections.

      Byrd, Jo; University of Derby (University of Cumbria, 2017)
      This paper describes the challenges of introducing a digital tool to trainee teachers. A group of nineteen undergraduate students studying primary education and in their third year of a four year course was introduced to PebblePad5. PebblePad is an online tool which is not new in the world of ITE. However, the latest version has more useful features and is less ‘clunky’ than older versions. The students each had their own private account where eventually they would be expected to store all of their placement files, add multi-modal content and then choose to share some or all of this content publically or by personal invitation via email. One of the benefits for us as an ITE provider is that we can view our students’ files electronically and comment on them without necessarily making the one/two hour round trip to the placement school. Although students used some technology, this research shows that students need more training in using technology competently in the workplace setting. Phase One of the project was to encourage the students to write their reflections on placement digitally. It was hoped that the students would be enthusiastic about using PebblePad and I would see an improvement in the levels of engagement with the reflective process and thus, the quality of teaching and learning as a result of this. Data obtained from questionnaires and a focus group indicate that PebblePad was viewed as a useful tool, but training issues and time constraints of the project meant it was not as successful for this cohort as was hoped. This paper discusses the issues that arose and the plan to overcome these barriers in the next phase of the implementation of PebblePad.
    • In defence of teacher education

      Hayes, Dennis; Marshall, Toby; University of Derby (Standing Committee for the Education and Training of Teachers (SCETT), 2011-03)
      A series of short essays by leading educationalists and trade unionists in response to the Coalition Government's document 'The Importance of Teaching: The Schools White Paper' (DfE 2010). The essays are grouped under three broad headings: 'What do teachers want from teacher education?' 'Who will defend teacher education?' and 'What can higher education offer teacher education?'
    • More morphostasis than morphogenesis? The ‘dual professionalism’ of English Further Education workshop tutors

      Esmond, Bill; Wood, Hayley; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2017-03-27)
      An international repositioning of vocational teachers in relation to knowledge and the workplace is reflected in English Further Education through the terminology of ‘dual professionalism’. Particularly in settings most closely linked to specific occupations, this discourse privileges occupational expertise that vocational educators bring from their former employment alongside pedagogic expectations of the teaching role. In a qualitative study of recently qualified teachers employed substantially in workshop settings, using the analytical framework of Margaret Archer, workplace skills and generic attributes provided a basis for claims to expertise, extending to a custodianship of former occupations. Further augmentation of educator roles, however, appeared constrained by market approaches to development and employment insecurity in the sector and beyond. In Archer’s terms, the current environment appears to cast ‘dual professionalism’ as morphostasis, drawing on former practice at the expense of teacher identity in the face of insecurity. Morphogenesis into enhanced professional teacher identities, for example, developing coherent vocational pedagogies informed by research into advances in knowledge, appears the less likely outcome in the current and emerging sector.
    • What teachers need to know

      Hardman, Alison; University of Derby (2016-07-07)
      Set within the current context of teaching and teacher education, this presentation will explore what at first glance seems a simplistic question: What do Teachers Need to Know? Drawing upon some pertinent international perspectives and implications for practice, the presentation will reflect upon important philosophical viewpoints that serve to frame perceptions of teacher knowledge. By addressing some of the wider political, professional and pedagogical considerations allied to this focus, the presentation raises some key questions for the very future of the profession.