• Behaviour in schools – is it as bad as they say – or is it worse?

      Davey, Ang; University of Derby (2016-08)
      This chapter will explore a range of sources that inform the government, the public and schools; what constitutes inappropriate behaviour in schools and the range, and scale of, the perceived problem around poor behaviour in schools. The chapter charts 35 years of insights into the nature of behaviour in schools from the Elton Report (1989) to the Ofsted Report (2014), and considers whether the problem of inappropriate behaviour has changed for the better or worse – or indeed not changed at all. The chapter considers why the issue is deemed important, again by drawing on a range of government and academic reports. Finally, Haydn (2014) adds the learner voice to the discussion.
    • The role of brokerage within career guidance: a literature review

      Hallam, Rachel; Morris, Marian; Hooley, Tristram; Neary, Siobhan; Mackay, Susan; SWQ; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (2016-04)
      This paper reports on the findings from a review of the literature relating to the brokerage role of career guidance services. The review initially identified over 15,000 papers for possible inclusion and a systematic process was applied which sifted these down to only the highest quality research papers with direct relevance to the research question: How is effective brokerage between education and employers organised?The review found that much of the research in this area is based on organisations with a sole remit for brokering the links between employers and education. Their funding and delivery models were, in most cases, quite different to that of the current National Careers Service. The studies also focused on the perceived impact and benefits of the links between employers and educational institutions, with rather less evidence on the pre-conditions for such links or on the ways in which they could best be engendered and supported. Nonetheless, the research highlighted the wide-ranging benefits these links can have for both parties, with impacts on: • Schools, colleges and pupils such as: improved motivation and attainment; contextualisation of learning; reduction in NEET; greater understanding of industries and educational pathways; clarification of career aspirations; and improved transitions into further and higher education, training or the workplace. • Employers such as: the development of company personnel; the building of a positive reputation for organisations and the contribution to business recruitment strategies. Based on this evidence, the review provides some summary guidance on the factors that the National Careers Service should consider in the development of a brokerage role between education institutions and employers.
    • 'They've got their backs to the sea': Careers Work in Kent's coastal schools

      Shepherd, Claire; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2016-02)
      Kent's coastal schools are a highly diverse group of institutions which serve a range of different communities. In a literal sense the young people of Kent have got their backs to the sea. Despite their relative proximity to the economic heartland of England, they remain separated by distance and geography. Many of the challenging issues that have been identified for young people in coastal towns are strongly related to their careers. Career describes the individual’s progression through life, learning and work. Individual’s careers are profoundly influenced by the context within which they pursue them. But, context does not wholly define your career. With the right information, support and education people can make the most out of their circumstances, seize the opportunities around them and change, improve or leave their immediate environment. Career guidance describes a range of educational interventions that are designed to help people to realise their potential and make the most of their career.