Recent Submissions

  • ‘I don’t make out how important it is or anything’: identity and identity formation by part-time higher education students in an English further education college.

    Esmond, Bill; Chesterfield College (Taylor & Francis, 2012-07-04)
    Policymakers in England have recently, in common with other Anglophone countries, encouraged the provision of higher education within vocational Further Education Colleges. Policy documents have emphasised the potential contribution of college-based students to widening participation: yet the same students contribute in turn to the difficulties of this provision. This article draws on a study of part-time higher education students in a college, a group whose perspectives, identities and voices have been particularly neglected by educational research. Respondents’ narratives of non-participation at 18 indicated the range of social and geographical constraints shaping their decisions and their aspirations beyond higher education; whilst they drew on vocational and adult traditions to legitimate college participation, their construction of identity was also shaped by the boundaries between further education and the university. These distinctive processes illustrate both possibilities and constraints for future higher education provision within colleges
  • Documenting an educational imaginary – representations of schooling in British documentary films.

    Tupling, Claire; University of Derby (Либра Скорп (Libra Scorp), 2018-09-26)
  • School belonging among young adolescents with SEMH and MLD: the link with their social relations and school inclusivity

    Dimitrellou, Eleni; Hurry, Jane; University of Derby; Institute of Education, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, University of London, London, UK (Taylor & Francis, 2018-08-20)
    Despite the considerable institutional changes schools have made to accommodate the individual needs of pupils with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), as underpinned by key principles of inclusion, there is still international concern about the mainstream experiences pupils with SEND have in school settings. This study helps us understand the schooling experiences of pupils with behavioural difficulties and learning difficulties by investigating whether they have a sense of belonging and positive social relations and whether these vary according to the level of inclusiveness of the school ethos at the institution they attend. Perceived social relations and feelings of belonging of 1,440 (282 SEND) young adolescents from three secondary mainstream settings that differ in inclusivity, were analysed using a self-reporting questionnaire. Findings demonstrated that pupils with SEND are not a homogeneous group, as pupils with behavioural difficulties were found to have less of a sense of belonging, and social relations than those with learning difficulties. It was also found that the sense of belonging of both groups is associated with their positive perceived relations with teachers and their inclusiveness of school ethos. These findings contribute as they offer ways of enhancing the sense of belonging of pupils with behavioural and learning difficulties in schools.
  • Assessing the inclusivity of three mainstream secondary schools in England: challenges and dilemmas

    Dimitrellou, Eleni; Hurry, Jane; Male, Dawn; University of Derby; Institute of Education, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, University of London, London, UK; Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, University of London, London, UK (Taylor & Francis, 2018-08-21)
    The notion of inclusion has gained momentum worldwide, with most countries around the world embracing inclusive policies in their educational systems. However, there is still an ongoing debate as to what is inclusion and hence, the consequent challenge of coming up with an agreed definition, which could then be used to plan for and subsequently, evaluate, inclusion. This study adds to our understanding of inclusion by contrasting objective (i.e. School Census Statistics) and subjective (i.e. self- report questionnaire) measures of inclusivity in three mainstream secondary schools in England and by comparing the perceptions of school inclusivity of different groups of educational practitioners and pupils. The results of this study indicate that inclusion is a ‘slippery’ construct as the perception of inclusion of educational practitioners was found to be affected by their role at school while pupil perception on this matter depended upon their SEND category. However, despite these subjective differences in the way inclusion is perceived, there was also substantial agreement across the different categories of participants with regard to the relative ranking of inclusivity across the three schools suggesting that coming up with overarching themes on what is inclusion is achievable. The article ends with explaining the benefits of reaching an agreed definition at a national level.
  • Beyond comparative institutional analysis: a workplace turn in English TVET

    Esmond, Bill; University of Derby (Vocational Education and Training Network (VETNET), 2018-09-04)
    Vocational education analyses often compare national patterns seen to favour industry-based training, state schooling or personal investment in skills acquisition: these are increasingly offered as ‘templates’ to new and established industrial economies. Institutionalist scholarship has correspondingly foregrounded skill formation as key to national policy differences; in particular historical institutionalism has focused on the role of labour market and state actors in negotiating and contesting arrangements for skill formation. Whilst paying relatively little direct attention to educational practice, these approaches provide theoretical tools to understand policy differences and to identify possibilities, limitations and strategies for change. This paper draws on their application in England, where apprenticeship and technical education reforms are periodically represented as relocating skills formation to the point of production on the model of collectivist systems: case study data is examined for evidence of institutional change strategies within emerging educational practices. Whilst the absence of engaged labour market actors renders the adoption of a substantially different model improbable, contestation over knowledge, control and educational roles is nevertheless evident, indicating the deployment of strategies for significant change. Their outcomes will determine the availability of transitions, with a layering of selective opportunities threatening to diminish the opportunities available to others.
  • Working together.

    Johnston, Jane; Szenasi, Judith; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-02-16)
  • The mental health needs of refugee pupils.

    Hewitt, Shirley; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-08-23)
  • Maths mastery: The key to pedagogical liberation?

    Benson, David; University of Derby (Association of Teachers of Mathematics, 2016-12-20)
  • Self-harm - dispelling the myths.

    Davey, Ang; Davey, Anna; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-08-23)
  • Why are there no great women artists? The positioning of women artists within fine art and craft.

    Yates, Ellen; University of Derby (2018-03-07)
    Nochlin‘s 1971 essay Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists? highlighted the barriers that women have faced within the world of fine art to be recognised , valued and exhibited. These include socio cultural and socio- economic factors, access to education, space, time and institutional barriers. Dominant discourses around the positioning of women’s work draw upon the status of the artist as ‘amateur’ or ‘professional’, alongside continuing debates in relation to the fine art/ craft divide and the status afforded to each. The dominance of the gendered masculine ideal , encompassing an ‘artist as genius’ stereotype pervades, despite advances in the public face of women’s art. (Korsmeyer 2004) This has led many women (and increasingly men) to seek refuge in the domain of craft as a more fruitful platform for exploring ideas. Women artists have used the visual language of craft to explore political ideas and to disrupt, challenge and parody dominant discourses about what can be considered ‘fine art’ and what it is to be ‘an artist’. This paper will explore these ideas in relation to examples of women’s work in the recent past in fine art and craft and contemporary work. The utilisation of craft by men will also be considered. The paper will conclude with an exploration of what is required to be a successful ‘artist’ in today’s world of self -promotion, online galleries and entrepenurship.
  • Developing creativity in early childhood studies students.

    Yates, Ellen; Twigg, Emma; University of Derby (2016)
    The study aimed to identify Early Childhood Studies students’ perceptions of, and confidence in, their own creativity, in an East Midlands university in England; and the influence of practical, creative activities on their practice with children. The study was qualitative in nature, framed within the interpretative paradigm and based on a first year Play and Creativity module which includes practical creative activity and the development of skills to enhance confidence. The key role of the practitioner in supporting children’s creativity has been highlighted (Craft 2002, Wright 2010) alongside the need for skills and confidence in practitioners. (Aubrey and Dahl 2013, Chien and Hui 2010) A study group of 25 was opportunity sampled from the full cohort of 90. Students completed questionnaires at the beginning and end of the module, alongside self- reflection sheets after five practical activities. Results were coded and analysed thematically. The study complied with the institution’s ethical procedures and participation was voluntary. Students were free to withdraw at any point. The results indicated improvement in students’ confidence in their own creativity and their ability to apply the skills developed within their practice. Students developed a wider understanding of the nature of creativity, including the importance of the environment, resources and opportunities for children to explore . The module supported students’ professional skills, including, team working, listening skills, collaboration and the importance of reflection on practice. The study concluded that practical activities within the module should continue to form part of the Early Childhood Studies Degree programme.
  • The McDonaldization of higher education revisited.

    Hayes, Dennis; Wynyard, Robin; University of Derby (Routledge, 2016-06-02)
    Since The McDonaldization of Higher Education was published in 2002 the McDonaldizing processes of efficiency, predictability, reliability and control seem to have come to dominate universities throughout the world through turning students into consumers who buy degrees made up of bite-sized, credit-rated modules, subjecting universities to the requirements of national and global league tables and re-constructing lecturers as facilitators of the ‘student experience’. The success of university management in restructuring universities as McBusinesses is premised on a seeming contradiction. As universities have been McDonaldized they have spontaneously embraced therapy culture and have become therapeutic universities. The therapeutic approach towards students adopted by management was supported by academics who failed to see or challenge the new student-centred culture. Therapy Culture was not contradictory but complementary to the ruthless McDonaldization of universities. Discussions of the marketization and bureaucratization of higher education have been ineffectual in terms of understanding the importance of the therapeutic turn and therefore have not been able to cohere any effective resistance to McDonaldization. Taking our previous work forward, we examine the ineluctable connection between the forces leading to McDonaldization and the therapeutic turn and how they are leading to the McDonaldization of the student soul.
  • La transición del preescolar a la primaria ¿Cómo aprenden los niños a leer el contexto escolar?

    Delgado-Fuentes, Marco Antonio; Universidad Iberoamericana, Ciudad de México (Universidad Iberoamericana, Ciudad de México, 2017)
  • La tradición de la organización comunitaria y la participación social en un preescolar de la Ciudad de México

    Delgado-Fuentes, Marco Antonio; González Peral, Adriana; Universidad Iberoamericana, Ciudad de México (El Colegio de SonoraJuan Pablo Editor, 2015)
  • Book Review: Academic Freedom in an Age of Conformity: confronting the fear of knowledge, by Joanna Williams

    Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2017-04-04)
    Book Review
  • The refuge of relativism.

    Hayes, Dennis; Mieschbuehler, Ruth; University of Derby (Routledge, 2015-01-08)
  • Challenges to implementing a new technology in Teacher Education. Phase One: ‘meaningful’ digital reflections.

    Byrd, Jo; University of Derby (University of Cumbria, 2017)
    This paper describes the challenges of introducing a digital tool to trainee teachers. A group of nineteen undergraduate students studying primary education and in their third year of a four year course was introduced to PebblePad5. PebblePad is an online tool which is not new in the world of ITE. However, the latest version has more useful features and is less ‘clunky’ than older versions. The students each had their own private account where eventually they would be expected to store all of their placement files, add multi-modal content and then choose to share some or all of this content publically or by personal invitation via email. One of the benefits for us as an ITE provider is that we can view our students’ files electronically and comment on them without necessarily making the one/two hour round trip to the placement school. Although students used some technology, this research shows that students need more training in using technology competently in the workplace setting. Phase One of the project was to encourage the students to write their reflections on placement digitally. It was hoped that the students would be enthusiastic about using PebblePad and I would see an improvement in the levels of engagement with the reflective process and thus, the quality of teaching and learning as a result of this. Data obtained from questionnaires and a focus group indicate that PebblePad was viewed as a useful tool, but training issues and time constraints of the project meant it was not as successful for this cohort as was hoped. This paper discusses the issues that arose and the plan to overcome these barriers in the next phase of the implementation of PebblePad.
  • La transición del preescolar a la primaria: El papel de las familias y el rol activo de los niños.

    Delgado-Fuentes, Marco Antonio; González Peral, Adriana; Martínez Valle, Claudia Osiris; The Ibero-American University (Universidad Autónoma del Estado de MorelosJuan Pablos Editor, 2014)
  • Developing an identity as an EdD leader: A reflexive narrative account.

    Tupling, Claire; Outhwaite, Deborah Emily; University of Derby; University of Warwick (Sage, 2017-11-22)
    This article considers the challenges encountered by a recently appointed assistant programme leader in establishing an identity as a leader of an EdD programme. In discussing literature on the development of the EdD, the article recognizes an existing concern with student identity but highlights a need to consider the development of the EdD leader’s identity as a leader. Employing a reflexive narrative, the article emphasizes the centrality of the leader’s disabled identity in considering the role of assistant programme leader and thus becoming a leader. The EdD is identified as a social space where colleagues are often engaged in their professional learning with the EdD leadership team providing support. This article tracks some of the commonplace behaviours around such learning in a post-1992 institution, and discusses the implications for EdD leadership and management teams when trying to consider and implement changes to established organizational cultures.

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