Recent Submissions

  • Emerging apprenticeship practitioner roles in England: conceptualising the subaltern educator

    Esmond, Bill; University of Derby (Springer, 2019-10-26)
    TVET educator roles and identities vary internationally, and are subject to repositioning, for example as the relative significance of institutions and the workplace change within national systems. In English apprenticeships, a key position has long been occupied by competence assessors, whose non-teaching role has related uneasily to those of professional educators. Following the introduction of new apprenticeship standards, former assessors are increasingly being allocated training responsibilities, raising issues about the expertise, identities and professional formation both of these emerging practitioners and of vocational educators in general. A qualitative study of assessors who have assumed greater training responsibilities examined these issues through individual and small-group interviews. Participant accounts of diverse and contested practices and environments suggested a need to conceptualise their roles in ways that draw upon but go beyond accounts of professionalism and occupational expertise developed at earlier stages. Drawing on Gramsci, the concept of the subaltern educator is put forward to characterise the complex position of these staff in the current climate of further education, the need for enhanced, rather than diminished, professional formation and wider possibilities for professional enhancement at a time of uncertainty for all vocational educators.
  • Towards being a "Good Cuban": socialist citizenship education in a globalized context.

    Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Springer, 21/10/2016)
    Considering the renewed diplomatic relations with the United States and to a globalized world, the Cuban State is forming global citizens while trying to retain socialist values in the face of increased market liberalization. Since the revolutionary period (1960s), Cuban education has stressed the intersecting values of fervent, resistant patriotism, hard work and active, solidary internationalism, as integral parts of the New Socialist Man/Woman or the “buen revolucionario” (good revolutionary). In this new economic, political and social context the Cuban government, its school system, and parents are challenged with preserving socialism and its accompanying values while preparing its young people for work and life in an evolving society and globalized world. Drawing on school textbooks and a wide range of interviews with young Cubans conducted by three education researchers, between 2011 and 2014, this chapter examines Cuban young people’s struggle to reconcile the contradictions and tensions between these ideals and the pragmatic reality of life, implying the need for new forms of national, international, global citizenship. Cuban youth are demanding a larger role in shaping their society if the government wants to keep them on the island. Consequently, the development of the buen revolucionario is taking on new meaning in the twenty-first century globalized world.
  • Cuba: educationaliImpact of the Cuban revolution

    Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Bloomsbury, 31/10/2019)
    Education in Mexico, Central America and the Latin Caribbean examines the development and practice of education in México, Costa Rica, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panamá. The chapters, written by local experts, provide an overview of the structure, aims and purposes of education in each of these ten countries with very different socio-economic backgrounds. The authors present curriculum standards, pedagogy, evaluation, accountability and delivery, discussing both how the formal systems are structured and how they actually function. The volume explores the origins of proposed reforms and their implementation, emphasising the distinctiveness of each country and attempting to locate new practices that could lead to better education.Including a comparative introduction to the issues facing education in the region as a whole and guides to available online datasets, this book is an essential reference for researchers, scholars, international agencies and policy-makers.
  • The “Three Ps” (perfecting, professionalization, and pragmatism) and their limitations for understanding Cuban education in the 1970s

    Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Rowman & Littlefield, 24/08/2018)
    This book provides, for the first time, a comprehensive assessment of the 1970s which challenges prevailing interpretations. Drawing from multidisciplinary perspectives and exploring a range of areas--including politics, international relations, culture, education, and healthcare--its contributing authors demonstrate that the decade was a time of intense transformation which proved pivotal to the development of the Revolution. Indeed, many of the ideas, approaches, policies, and legislation developed and tested during the 1970s maintain a very visible legacy in contemporary Cuba. In highlighting the complexity of the 1970s, this volume ultimately aims to contribute to a greater understanding of the Cuban Revolution and how it chooses to face the challenges of the twenty-first century.
  • Now we don’t see the university as something distant. It’s here in our hands’: situated pedagogy in Cuban municipal universities

    Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Institute for Education Policy Studies, 04/2019)
    The first years of the twenty-first century saw the introduction of a new mode of higher education in Cuba. Local university centres were set up across the country offering part time study to a range of students previously marginalised from higher education. As well as massively increasing access, this programme created a new kind of teacher – local professionals teaching part-time alongside their regular employment. Using the personal testimony of students and teachers in rural Granma, this paper examines the role of these teachers, with a particular emphasis on the value of their capacity to offer a pedagogy situated in the workplaces, communities and daily lives of their students.
  • Education, citizenship, and Cuban identity

    Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Palgrave Macmillan., 29/07/2016)
    This book explores how Cuba’s famously successful and inclusive education system has formed young Cubans’ political, social, and moral identities in a country transfigured by new inequalities and moral compromises made in the name of survival. The author examines this educational experience from the perspective of those who grew up in the years of economic crisis following the fall of the Soviet Union, charting their ideals, their frustrations and their struggle to reconcile revolutionary rhetoric with twenty-first century reality.
  • 'Bridging' the gap between VET and higher education: permeability or perpetuation?

    Esmond, Bill; University of Derby (VETNET, 2019-09-22)
    Demands for admission to higher education from vocational routes are widespread across Eu-rope but take different forms, depending on the recognition of tertiary VET or whether sharp-er distinctions between VET and higher education exist. In England, alongside policies pro-moting more employer-responsive tertiary provision, opportunities for ‘bridging’ from voca-tional routes to general university education, and vice versa, have been discussed. The study reported here examined four cases of existing provision supporting transitions into higher edu-cation, potential sites of practices supporting bridging across pathways. Each case provided valued support for progression to higher levels of study; yet these practices focused on exist-ing routes rather than transitions between more academic or vocationally-oriented sites. It is suggested, therefore, that the explicit denotation of separate tertiary provision may be more likely to constrain ‘bridging’ provision than for the latter to help students move beyond their existing route into substantially different forms of higher education.
  • The role of education and training in the development of technical elites: work experience and vulnerability

    Esmond, Bill; Atkins, Liz; Suart, Rebecca; University of Derby (VETNET, 2019-09-19)
    Whilst education and training systems in Europe have provided qualifications preparing candidates for highly skilled, responsible occupational roles, early research indicated that firms preferred to promote to such positions internally. Following changes to labour markets, several countries now place greater emphasis on early workplace learning, in the hope that transitions to work will be eased by experience of workplace environments. The outcomes of these shifts were explored through case studies in England of provision where work-based learning provides a high level of course content. Whilst students and educators ascribed value to these early experiences, evidence emerged of a narrowing of skills taught in work settings and em-phasis on behaviours and attributes. This emphasis is reflected among disadvantaged groups such as young women preparing for service roles: this paper argues for attention to the vulnerabilities of these groups, whose exclusion contributes to the reproduction of ‘elite’ occupations.
  • Emotion dysregulation and loneliness as predictors of food addiction

    Tatsi, Eirini; Kamal, Atiya; Turvill, Alistair; Regina, Holler; University of West London; Birmingham City University; Universtiy of Derby; Aston University (SIPISS-FerrariSinibaldi, 2019-01-01)
    Introduction: This study aimed to investigate whether multiple aspects of emotion dysregulation contribute to the etiology of Food Addiction (FA); as well as to provide further evidence and clarity regarding the role of loneliness on the development of addictive behaviour towards food.Methods: A correlational study was employed to assess associations within 162 participants which were recruited via online forums on FA and student population. The Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS), Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), and UCLA Loneliness Scale, and a demographic and personal information questionnaire were all completed online. A Poisson regression analysis was carried out and statistical significance was set at P <0.05.Results: 79% of the sample endorsed a persistent desire or repeated unsuccessful attempts to cut down or control their use of highly processed foods, while 21% met diagnostic criteria for food addiction. Poisson regression analysis demonstrated that the model predicts food addiction (P <0.001). Specifically, food addiction symptom count was positively predicted by difficulty engaging in goal-directed behaviour, impulse control difficulties, lack of emotional awareness and limited access to emotion regulation strategies (P <0.05); DERS total, nonacceptance of emotional responses and lack of emotional clarity were not significant predictors. Loneliness positively predicted food addiction (P =0.002).Discussion and Conclusions: The findings of this research provide further evidence on the etiology of food addiction, as multiple aspects of emotion dysregulation, including difficulty in engaging in goal-directed behaviour, impulsiveness, emotional awareness and limited access to emotion regulation strategies, and loneliness were found to influence the development of an addictive behaviour towards certain types of food. Future research will need to understand possible causality between these factors and insights into the potential role addictive behaviour of food has in overeating phenomena, such as binge-eating.
  • Socrates for Teachers

    Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-04-04)
    This chapter introduces Plato’s Socrates and his philosophy. The nearest we can get to authentic Socratic thought is in Plato’s earlier dialogues where he presents the views of his tutor in powerful dramatic form. Socrates embodies in his life, and death, a commitment to freedom of speech that was not shared by the polis of Athens (or by most people today). Sections of Plato’s dramatic dialogues are presented at length to illustrate his life, his commitment to argument and to examining all beliefs however strongly held. Socrates embodies the critical spirit and the understanding that freedom of speech was the only way to knowledge. To convince anyone of the power of Socrates’ thinking and his moral example cannot be achieved through any introduction. The success of this chapter will be decided by those who go on to read the dialogues. If you stop here and pick up and read any of the Socratic dialogues, the Apology, the Crito, the Phaedo, the Protagoras, the Meno, or the Theaetetus then you will know the man without any intermediary other than Plato. The lesson of this chapter is: ‘always study the original texts’.
  • A culture of youth: young people, youth organisations and mass participation in Cuba 1959-62.

    Luke, Anne; University of Derby (Paradigm/ Routledge, 2014-06-30)
  • Youth organizations in revolutionary Cuba, 1959–1962: from Unidad to Vanguardia

    Luke, Anne; University of Derby (Routledge, 2016)
    The ubiquitous billboards in Cuba featuring the emblem of the Young Communist League (UJC) are part of the landscape of the revolution. The profiles of Che Guevara, Camilo Cienfuegos, and Julio Antonio Mella, staring into a blissful future under the slogan “Estudio, Trabajo, Fusil” (Study, Work, Rifle) are among the most recognizable motifs of communist Cuba. Such organization came from the first three years of the revolution; its existence cannot be taken for granted. The enthusiasm of the early years is not in doubt, but a closer assessment of the search for stability and meaning is timely. Youth is a case in point. The high expectations, uncertainty, and excitement for young people become evident through an examination of the evolution of youth organizations between 1959 and 1962. Initiatives aimed at unity largely coordinated by the Young Socialists (JS), the ascendance of a culture of mass participation with the meteoric rise of the Association of Young Rebels (AJR), and the creation of the UJC in 1962 show the move to selectivity and youth politics as opposed to other, broader initiatives. The story of the youth organizations not only reveals the reasons behind the failure to sustain a mass organization for young people, but also the rapid change and levels of uncertainty to which young Cubans were exposed in the early years of the revolution as they sought to be and become young rebels and young communists within an evolving social revolution
  • Values production through social and emotional learning

    Wood, Peter; University of Derby (Routledge, 2015)
    This chapter considers if social and emotional learning(SEL) schemes have the potential to marginalise and promote certain values, norms and behaviours, to guard against cultural pollution. It explores the historical underpinnings of values education and highlights concerns regarding values production via the national and hidden curriculum. Education serves a function for society as it should shape social beings by instilling shared moral traditions, practices and ideals. Such opinion is also demonstrable in terminology of various acts of parliament in the United Kingdom, like 1944 Education Act and the Education Reform Act 1988, which both identified the central role of education system in values production. The National Curriculum, which stemmed from latter of these acts, was the first step in explicitly recognising the integral tenet of schooling in shaping the values of pupils, by making it compulsory for schools. Current educational policy and its narrow emphasis on academic performance is one of the obvious barriers to the realisation of mutual reach.
  • Listening to Los Beatles: being young in 1960s Cuba

    Luke, Anne; University of Derby (Indiana University Press, 2013)
  • Acquisition, development and maintenance of maths anxiety in young children

    Petronzi, Dominic; Staples, Paul; Sheffield, David; Hunt, Thomas; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-02-18)
  • Overview of childhood (Mexico).

    Delgado-Fuentes, Marco Antonio; University of Derby (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
  • Friendship and peer cultures in childhood (Mexico).

    Fritz Macias, Heidi; Universidad Iberoamericana (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
  • Special needs and disabilities in childhood (Mexico).

    Reyes, Andrea Saldivar; Guzmán Zamora, Josué; Universidad de Tlaxcala (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)
  • Agency and rights in childhood (Mexico).

    Martínez, José Francisco; ACUDE (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2019)

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