• The Ukrainian crisis, the Crimean referendum and security implications for the European Union

      Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (University American College, Skopje, 2014-12-01)
    • Under my (editorial) thumb: hegemonic masculinity and text ownership in the works of the Mexican Onda

      Carpenter, Victoria; University of Derby (2010)
      Connell and Messerschmidt's article 'Hegemonic Masculinity: Rethinking the Concept' (2005) re-evaluates the popular term to produce 'a more complex model of gender hierarchy' (829). The notion of hierarchy influenced by power redistribution is the foundation of the present study of the works of the Mexican Onda movement. Instead of adopting an expected gender perspective, this article presents a study of text ownership based upon a narratological interpretation of the concept of hegemonic masculinity as a mechanism of controlling the text. The analysis will examine the power struggle between the first-person narrator and editor with a view to determining the effect this struggle has on character (re)creation. The study will employ Ricoeur's interpretation of non-linear narrative, and various studies of transculturation and its effect on the interpretations of literary texts. The texts analysed in this article include the story La tumba (1964) by José Agustín, Gustavo Sainz's novel Obsesivos días circulares (1969), and Parménides García Saldaña's short story 'Goodbye Belinda' from the collection El rey criollo (1971).
    • Understanding the place of Australian English: exploring folk linguistic accounts through contemporary Australian authors

      Mulder, Jean; Penry Williams, Cara; University of Melbourne (Victoria, Australia) (JM); La Trobe University (Victoria, Australia) (CPW) (Taylor and Francis, 2018-02-19)
      This paper explores Australian English (AuE), utilising a folk linguistic approach and engaging with its use in novel-writing. It is argued that discussions by contemporary Australian authors about their approaches to writing and voicing characters, and the actual voices authors give to their characters can be used as data to gain new understandings of what language forms have social meanings within AuE. The value of this analytical approach is then illustrated with interview and text extracts from one Australian author, revealing that this type of analysis provides insights into both the folk linguistic understandings of an author and how language variation is employed within the fiction series to index local types. It is concluded that such an approach can be generalised to better understand variation in AuE as accessed by other language-focussed professions and their differing conceptualisations of language, as well as to further understand variation in other varieties of English, and in other languages.
    • Unravelling Space and Landscape in Leisure Identities

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)
      This chapter considers leisure identities through the occurrence of landscape. Prevailing notions of landscape are questioned and critiques, from the notion of what landscape is, so as to work towards a discussion of the relationships between ourselves, landscape and 'place' in the doing of leisure
    • The use of unequal randomisation in clinical trials — An update.

      Peckham, Emily; Brabyn, Sally; Cook, Liz; Devlin, Thomas; Dumville, Jo; Torgerson, David J.; University of York; University of Manchester (Elsevier, 2015-11)
      Objective To update a 2005 review of the reasons researchers have given for the use of unequal randomisation in randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Main measures Intervention being tested; type of study; number of participants; randomisation ratio; sample size calculation and reason given for using unequal randomisation. Methods Review of trials using unequal randomisation. Databases and sources Cochrane library, Medline and CINAHL. Results A total of 86 trials were identified. Of these 82 trials (95%) recruited patients in favour of the experimental group. Various reasons for the use of unequal randomisation were given including: gaining treatment experience; identification of adverse events; ethical; logistic and enhancing recruitment. No trial reported explicitly used it for cost-effectiveness. Most of the papers (i.e. 47, 55%) did not state why they had used unequal randomisation and only 38 trials (44%) appeared to have taken the unequal randomisation into account in their sample size calculation. Conclusion Most studies did not mention the rationale for unequal allocation, and a significant proportion did not appear to account for it in the sample size calculations. Unlike the previous review economic considerations were not stated as a rationale for its use. A number of trials used it to enhance recruitment, although this has not been tested.
    • A utilitarian antagonist: the zombie in popular video games

      Hunt, Nathan; The University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)
      This article takes as its starting point the prevalence of the zombie in video games. I argue that, although the zombie games often superficially resemble filmic texts in their use of aesthetic and narrative, they must be understood, less as a set of conventions and thematic metaphors in the way that the zombie text has been read in film and television scholarship, and more as a utilisation of the zombie as a utilitarian antagonist that facilitates and permits the pleasures of violence and fantasy in video game play. Beginning with the Resident Evil and Left 4 Dead series of games I examine the way that games necessarily update the notion zombie as mass antagonist via the need to vary gameplay activity through different styles of adversary for players. At the same time I will demonstrate that, far from simply being the province of the survival horror genre, the zombie appears across an array of game forms, game cultures and game productions. The zombie highlights the participatory nature of game culture in the array of zombie 'mods' that users create to transform existing games into zombie based games, in particular in relation to titles such as the Call of Duty series. At the other end of the production spectrum the zombie features heavily in the little studied area of online flash games where the zombie can be found in a variety of game genres and forms. The zombie here often operates as a pastiche of popular zombie narratives in survival games (The Last Stand), parodic engagements with zombie conventions (Jetpacks and Zombies) or play with the notion of zombie pandemics (the Infectionator games). Here I situate the zombie game as a aesthetic genre that works to provide an easily understandable context for such interactive genres as survival horror, text adventures, shooting games, physics games and driving games, with the popularity of these enough to drive numerous dedicated hosting and link sites such as zombiegames.net. The pastiche element of these games extends into gamers social engagement with games. Online debates over the the appropriate actions or preparation for a zombie holocaust are commonplace on the internet in such spaces as Zombieresearch.net. Whilst many of these sites feature decidedly tongue in cheek engagement with the notion of the zombie apocalypse, the users of fora for games like Left 4 Dead and Dead Island tend to debate this directly in the terms of the games themselves, discussing their relative merits or realism. Some of these games also highlight the specific pleasures of identifying the zombie as protagonist of sorts. In discussing this I will return to online gaming and the Left 4 Dead games in which players may compete online as part of the zombie horde. Such games raise major questions for the issues of identification and immersion that are said to be at the centre of the game experience. I will also explore the parodic pleasures of many flash games that situate the player in the role of spreading zombie infections. Throughout this article I aim to demonstrate that the zombie in game culture is less a cultural metaphor than a combination of utilitarian antagonist and a persistent aesthetic; a means of providing style or pleasure to many games that relies on the intertextual and flexible nature of the zombie as popular cultural phenomenon.
    • We will not disrupt your education.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (University of Leeds, 2011)
    • White t-shirt, black marker: mapping the undergraduate body.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Sheffield (2008)
      A film about students in Sheffield.
    • Who Are We, Where Do We Come From, Where Are We Going To? Greek Cypriot Women Artists in Contemporary Cyprus

      Photiou, Maria; Loughborough University (Taylor & Francis Publishers, 2012)
      This article is about Greek Cypriot women artists. In particular it concerns their art, their careers, and their relation to politics; the way they were influenced by politics in Cyprus and how they represented the political upheavals of the time in their own practice. Although all these artists experienced the several phases of Cypriot history in a different way, they all have something in common: the fact that these artists were women living in a colonised, patriarchal country under Greek Cypriot nationality. Their practices are the result of what they experienced and an analysis of their work will reveal the artistic strategies they applied as a response to the politics in Cypriot society.
    • Who groks Spock? Emotion in the neoliberal market.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Sheffield (Lawrence and Wishart, 2015-04)
      Creative non-fiction essay that casts Spock as Homo economicus. Commissioned by Radical Future (a series of political books published by Lawrence & Wishart).
    • Why use mimeograph?

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (2016)
    • Why women don’t win literary awards: the saltire society literary awards and implicit stereotyping

      Marsden, Stevie; University of Leicester (Taylor and Francis, 2019-02-01)
      The purpose of this analysis is to consider the Saltire Society’s Book of the Year and First Book of the Year Awards in relation to wider issues pertaining to media representations of Scottish literary and publishing culture. Through a statistical analysis of the Society’s Book of the Year and First Book of the Year shortlists and winners between 1988 and 2014, this examination shows the extent to which the Society’s Literary Awards reflect, as opposed to subvert, historic and existing gender imbalances in Scottish literary and publishing culture. Indeed, despite critics arguing that there was a change in tide in the late 1980s and early 1990s regarding the balance in gender representation in Scottish literature, this analysis suggests that Scotland’s book award culture, and in turn, literary culture more widely, remains dominated by men. Perceptions of the apparent ‘balancing’ of the gender disparity in Scottish writing do not align with the statistics discussed here, a fact further evidence by misconceptions held by members of the Society’s own Literary Awards judging panels. Accordingly, this article contends that such inconsistencies lend credence to the argument that the Society’s judges have participated in implicit stereotyping based upon culturally pervasive stereotypes’ that Scottish women writers play a ‘minor’ role in Scottish literary and publishing culture.
    • "The widows and orphans of servants are dying": The conflict of family in the design and application of nineteenth-century civil servant pensions

      McIlvenna, Kathleen; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019-04-22)
      The Post Office is a Victorian institution. There had of course been postal systems before this time and in other places but the idea that all people in all places should be connected through the mail was a new idea. In the context of this volume, the existence and development of the Post Office network matters for two reasons. Firstly, because letters connected families and kin who were not proximately resident, and they also had the capacity to make notional kinship into a functional resource. In chapters by Steven King, Cara Dobbing and Geoff Monks elsewhere in this volume it is clear that whatever the co-residential family unit might have looked like, letters were a vital mechanism for conveying information, renewing and repairing kinship bonds and giving meaning to the fictive kinship networks that are the focus of the work of Naomi Tadmor. Secondly, in order to provide this service large (and increasing) numbers of employees were needed. This inevitably means that the nature of work for Post Office was a potent force in shaping family life, the nature of family relations and (in the sense that for some employees the Post Office acted as an alternate family) the very meaning of terms such as ‘family’ or ‘kin’. Moreover, in the sense that Post Office workers rapidly became part of a wider nineteenth-century movement for employers to provide superannuation schemes, we might expect the service to have shaped the long-term planning of family life and even the likelihood of re-marriage or the timing of children leaving home.
    • Writing & responsibility

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (Routledge, 2005)
      In a world where literary scandals often end up in court, the issue of responsibility in writing has never been more important. In this groundbreaking study, Carl Tighe asks the questions every writer needs to consider: • What is it that writers do? Are they responsible for all the uses to which their writing might be put? Or no more responsible than their readers? • How are a writer's responsibilities compromised or defined by commercial or political pressures, or by notions of tradition or originality? • How does a writer's audience affect their responsibilities? Are these the same for writers in all parts of the world, under all political and social systems? The first part of this book defines responsibility and looks at its relation to ideas such as power, accuracy, kitsch and political correctness. The second part examines how particular writers have dealt with these issues through a series of often controversial case studies, including American Psycho, Crash and The Tin Drum. Writing and Responsibility encourages its readers to interrogate the choices they make as writers.
    • You anorak!: the Doctor Who experience and experiencing Doctor Who

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (Intellect, 2013)