• Taste à-la-Mode: Consuming foreignness, picturing gender

      Gowrley, Freya; University of Edinburgh (2018-06-01)
      Art history has enriched the study of material culture as a scholarly field. This interdisciplinary volume enhances this literature through the contributors' engagement with gender as the conceptual locus of analysis in terms of femininity, masculinity, and the spaces in between. Collectively, these essays by art historians and museum professionals argue for a more complex understanding of the relationship between objects and subjects in gendered terms. The objects under consideration range from the quotidian to the exotic, including beds, guns, fans, needle paintings, prints, drawings, mantillas, almanacs, reticules, silver punch bowls, and collage. These material goods may have been intended to enforce and affirm gendered norms, however as the essays demonstrate, their use by subjects frequently put normative formations of gender into question, revealing the impossibility of permanently fixing gender in relation to material goods, concepts, or bodies. This book will appeal to art historians, museum professionals, women's and gender studies specialists, students, and all those interested in the history of objects in everyday life
    • Techniques to encourage early and frequent writing.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (The Professional and Higher Partnership, 2017-06-19)
      As the result of recent changes in the research landscape, researchers are now commonly required to do more than just research. For example, they are often expected to take responsibility for post-research activities, including engagement with government, business, and the public. To meet these expectations, an array of skills is required, including communication, networking, leadership, and the management of stakeholders. The need to develop such skills in researchers presents a challenge to those responsible for their development. These include researcher developers, principal investigators, research supervisors, staff developers, careers professionals, research office staff, and research centre managers. These developers face additional demands from the need to help researchers develop their careers and employability. 53 solutions, each tested in practice, for meeting these challenges are presented here, accompanied by practical advice on their implementation and the potential pitfalls involved.This book's 45 contributors provide practical strategies, drawn from experience across several continents, to enhance the practices and policies of researcher development. Designed for dipping into, the book enables researcher developers, supervisors and academic developers to: enrich their approaches; innovate to enhance and embed educational value; and do more with limited resources.
    • Telephone-supported computerised cognitive–behavioural therapy: REEACT-2 large-scale pragmatic randomised controlled trial.

      Gilbody, Simon; Brabyn, Sally; Lovell, Karina; Kessler, David; Devlin, Thomas; Smith, Lucy; Araya, Ricardo; Barkham, Michael; Bower, Peter; Cooper, Cindy; et al. (Cambridge University Press, 2018-01-02)
      Background Computerised cognitive–behavioural therapy (cCBT) for depression has the potential to be efficient therapy but engagement is poor in primary care trials. Aims We tested the benefits of adding telephone support to cCBT. Method We compared telephone-facilitated cCBT (MoodGYM) ( n = 187) to minimally supported cCBT (MoodGYM) ( n = 182) in a pragmatic randomised trial (trial registration: ISRCTN55310481). Outcomes were depression severity (Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire (GAD)-7) and somatoform complaints (PHQ-15) at 4 and 12 months. Results Use of cCBT increased by a factor of between 1.5 and 2 with telephone facilitation. At 4 months PHQ-9 scores were 1.9 points lower (95% CI 0.5–3.3) for telephone-supported cCBT. At 12 months, the results were no longer statistically significant (0.9 PHQ-9 points, 95% CI –0.5 to 2.3). There was improvement in anxiety scores and for somatic complaints. Conclusions Telephone facilitation of cCBT improves engagement and expedites depression improvement. The effect was small to moderate and comparable with other low-intensity psychological interventions.
    • Television dramas as memory screens

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (2011)
      Abstract: Within this article I am focus upon the construction of both social and personal memories within the television drama, drawing upon Landsberg’s notion of prosthetic memory and King’s identification of ‘afterwardsness’ as ways of comprehending the construction of memory and the past within texts. The examples are The Long Walk to Finchley (Tony Saint, BBC 4, 2008) and Life on Mars (2007-8). Both dramas share a number of concerns yet each has a very different context within British television. The relationship between viewers’ adopting memories from the dramas and incorporating these into their own sets of memories, including my own memories of the dramas is considered. Equally, the negotiation of the media and public discourses as memory screens with which we interact is a primary concern.
    • Theory on theory.

      Sims, Robin; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2017-07-19)
      Key debates in the domain of ‘Theory on Theory’ have this year focused upon the legacies of the theorists grouped together under the name ‘poststructuralism’, often drawing on material made available in recent decades by Barthes, Foucault and Deleuze which adds new facets to critical understanding of their work. Reflecting on their contributions, it appears that individual theorists can illuminate or extend each other’s oeuvres: Foucault in particular has attracted considerable attention in this vein in 2016, with books appearing which respectively place his ideas alongside those of Marx, Derrida and Deleuze. His lectures on ‘governmentality’, meanwhile, have prompted some to claim that his account of neoliberalism therein demonstrated a ‘quiet appreciation’ of it (Peter Fleming, The Mythology of Work: How Capitalism Persists Despite Itself (Pluto Press [2015]), p. 45). Turning to Barthes, we find re-evaluations...
    • Theory on theory.

      Sims, Robin; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2016-05-19)
      Theory on Theory' names a body of work which investigates the inheritances of theory and suggests future directions. As David Winters has observed in a previous edition, writing of this kind has been associated with declarations of the'death of theory' (YWCCT 22:i[2014] 2), the contention that we exist 'after' it. On the contrary: theory continues to mutate. This chapter will focus upon work published in 2015; the variety of topics covered attests to the growing range of theoretical concerns. There have been re-evaluations of the work of major figures in the field: a new journal focusing on the work of Roland Barthes, accompanied by a feast of newly-translated material written by him, prompts a consideration of his legacy and its significance for future work; studies of the relationships between the ideas of Walter Benjamin and Theodor Adorno, and of Lacan and Marx, add new insights to the existing scholarship on these thinkers and demonstrate the ways in which they can continue to illuminate theoretical debate. Books drawing on a range of theoretical and philosophical sources have also appeared on the nature of literature, the recent development of interest in the 'nonhuman', and the 'horror of philosophy'.
    • 'They got to go': SKA versus America

      Philo, Simon; University of Derby (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2014-01)
      Dynamics of Interconnections in Popular Culture(s) is an eclectic and free-ranging collection of articles grounded in a combination of the social sciences with the populist humanities. The collection is further unified by an approach that considers changes and linkages within and between cultural systems as evidenced through their respective popular cultures. The key underlying assumption is that our collective popular expressions create an arena of global cultural exchange, further precipitating new cultural adaptations, expressions, and connections. The volume is divided into two sections. The first consists of articles investigating theoretical and methodological approaches to the dynamics of history and cultural changes. These include cultural anthropology, history, economics, and sociology. The second section is made up of explorations into a myriad of cultural practices and expressions that exemplify not only the wide diversity of popular cultures and their workings, but also the interconnections between and within those cultural systems. A wide variety of specific case studies are presented to evidence and support the more general points made in the previous section. The collection demonstrates that the everyday lives of ordinary people, while varying from culture to culture, are unified through their expressions of shared humanity.
    • This Time and Now: identity & belonging in the Irish Diaspora: the Irish in Britain and second generational silence

      McCrory, Moy; University of Derby (Rodopi Press, 2012)
      The Irish in Britain have only recently been granted ethnic status. This blind spot which existed towards the Irish community, even as highly visible negative assumptions about the Irish circulated, resulted in a strange invisibility which simultaneously derided as it denied Irish identity, and failed to acknowledge the Irish as an ethnic group. This has effected how the generation born from the 1950’s/60’s migration into England can both consider and describe their notion of identity. Silence, denial and over identification reveal how the sense of non belonging, or ‘otherness’ is a common touch stone, and identification as a constant outsider is a prominent note. Criticisms of national identity levelled against the second generation from within the community reveal attitudes about ownership of a ‘nationhood’ which is still contested ground. Identity displayed through those visible traditions which are frequently stronger in displaced communities can not be taken as the sole markers of national belonging as memories, silences and post memories impact on such constantly evolving groups as are created by emigration. Historic patterns and beliefs which are traceable through the images, stories and customs which were originally brought over create an image bank with which the generation born in England might consider and negotiate its relationship to nation and home. This paper asks whether the models this generation grew up with, and which have begun the journey from lived experience into literature and into folklore, can still have a relevant social function when we consider the idea of identity and belonging?
    • Tibet in the Western Imagination

      Neuhaus, Tom; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012)
      Neuhaus explores the roots of the long-standing European fascination with Tibet, from the Dalai Lama to the Abominable Snowman. Surveying a wide range of travel accounts, official documents, correspondence and fiction, he examines how different people thought about both Tibet and their home cultures.
    • A time to grieve: Women, mourning and remembrance in the Irish diaspora community.

      McCrory, Moy; University of Derby (Edge Publishing, 2017)
      From the private to the public. Social attitudes to bereavement and the expression of grief relating to female public expression in the Irish Diasporic community in England. A writer considers personal experience in its social context and examines attitudes to behaviours and expressions of grief both past and present which allow the establishment of a female voice and presence.
    • To the Ladies Turbutt: Three women, three wills and three legacies.

      Flint, Alison Claire; University of Derby (Women's History Network, 2016-09)
      The paper demonstrates that three women from one Derbyshire Gentry family, the Turbutt family through wills and legacies influenced, shaped and controlled the matrilineal line for well over two hundred years. From paper and ink to text and the digital screen the consequences of their decisions reverberate into the twenty-first century. A judicious evaluation of the archival collection of the Turbutt family indicated that this group of records would yield rather more than a regular male oriented family pedigree. The paper argues that through bequests in both life and death the three women had agency to help, guide and empower. It explores the choices made by later generations of the same family that society would otherwise have prohibited; in these choices the women would not only enrage their close male relatives but also later generations of the familial patrilineal line. The paper explores how the platform of letters enabled/allowed women to step out of the hegemonic ideal of domesticity and into a world outside the gates of the landed estate. It will see how legacies and letters afforded two women to play the nineteenth-century stock market, and furthermore, it demonstrates the difference a century made in the nature of the financial subjects about which the Ogston women were writing to determine what and whom was of greatest concern.
    • Transitory literature or 'Brave New Text'? a comparative analysis of José Agustín's work

      Carpenter, Victoria; University of Derby (2007)
      This paper presents an aspect of an ongoing research project on the changing nature of the text in the works of the Onda literary movement in Mexico in the mid to late 1960s. The works analysed in this article are the stories 'La tumba' (1963) and '¿Cuál es la onda?' (1968) by José Agustín. The aim of the paper is to examine the triad of the creation/destruction/recreation of the text by identifying the changing roles played by the narrator(s) and the dissolution of the protagonists. The analysis also addresses multiple transcultural influences on the two texts and determines whether the conflicting combination thereof leads to the complete destruction of the text or the appearance of a new narrative form.
    • Twenty-first century book studies: the state of the discipline

      Noorda, Rachel; Marsden, Stevie; University of Leicester (Project Muse, 2019-05-16)
    • The Ukrainian crisis, the Crimean referendum and security implications for the European Union

      Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (University American College, Skopje, 2014-12-01)
    • Under my (editorial) thumb: hegemonic masculinity and text ownership in the works of the Mexican Onda

      Carpenter, Victoria; University of Derby (2010)
      Connell and Messerschmidt's article 'Hegemonic Masculinity: Rethinking the Concept' (2005) re-evaluates the popular term to produce 'a more complex model of gender hierarchy' (829). The notion of hierarchy influenced by power redistribution is the foundation of the present study of the works of the Mexican Onda movement. Instead of adopting an expected gender perspective, this article presents a study of text ownership based upon a narratological interpretation of the concept of hegemonic masculinity as a mechanism of controlling the text. The analysis will examine the power struggle between the first-person narrator and editor with a view to determining the effect this struggle has on character (re)creation. The study will employ Ricoeur's interpretation of non-linear narrative, and various studies of transculturation and its effect on the interpretations of literary texts. The texts analysed in this article include the story La tumba (1964) by José Agustín, Gustavo Sainz's novel Obsesivos días circulares (1969), and Parménides García Saldaña's short story 'Goodbye Belinda' from the collection El rey criollo (1971).
    • Understanding the place of Australian English: exploring folk linguistic accounts through contemporary Australian authors

      Mulder, Jean; Penry Williams, Cara; University of Melbourne (Victoria, Australia) (JM); La Trobe University (Victoria, Australia) (CPW) (Taylor and Francis, 2018-02-19)
      This paper explores Australian English (AuE), utilising a folk linguistic approach and engaging with its use in novel-writing. It is argued that discussions by contemporary Australian authors about their approaches to writing and voicing characters, and the actual voices authors give to their characters can be used as data to gain new understandings of what language forms have social meanings within AuE. The value of this analytical approach is then illustrated with interview and text extracts from one Australian author, revealing that this type of analysis provides insights into both the folk linguistic understandings of an author and how language variation is employed within the fiction series to index local types. It is concluded that such an approach can be generalised to better understand variation in AuE as accessed by other language-focussed professions and their differing conceptualisations of language, as well as to further understand variation in other varieties of English, and in other languages.
    • Unravelling Space and Landscape in Leisure Identities

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)
      This chapter considers leisure identities through the occurrence of landscape. Prevailing notions of landscape are questioned and critiques, from the notion of what landscape is, so as to work towards a discussion of the relationships between ourselves, landscape and 'place' in the doing of leisure
    • The use of unequal randomisation in clinical trials — An update.

      Peckham, Emily; Brabyn, Sally; Cook, Liz; Devlin, Thomas; Dumville, Jo; Torgerson, David J.; University of York; University of Manchester (Elsevier, 2015-11)
      Objective To update a 2005 review of the reasons researchers have given for the use of unequal randomisation in randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Main measures Intervention being tested; type of study; number of participants; randomisation ratio; sample size calculation and reason given for using unequal randomisation. Methods Review of trials using unequal randomisation. Databases and sources Cochrane library, Medline and CINAHL. Results A total of 86 trials were identified. Of these 82 trials (95%) recruited patients in favour of the experimental group. Various reasons for the use of unequal randomisation were given including: gaining treatment experience; identification of adverse events; ethical; logistic and enhancing recruitment. No trial reported explicitly used it for cost-effectiveness. Most of the papers (i.e. 47, 55%) did not state why they had used unequal randomisation and only 38 trials (44%) appeared to have taken the unequal randomisation into account in their sample size calculation. Conclusion Most studies did not mention the rationale for unequal allocation, and a significant proportion did not appear to account for it in the sample size calculations. Unlike the previous review economic considerations were not stated as a rationale for its use. A number of trials used it to enhance recruitment, although this has not been tested.
    • A utilitarian antagonist: the zombie in popular video games

      Hunt, Nathan; The University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)
      This article takes as its starting point the prevalence of the zombie in video games. I argue that, although the zombie games often superficially resemble filmic texts in their use of aesthetic and narrative, they must be understood, less as a set of conventions and thematic metaphors in the way that the zombie text has been read in film and television scholarship, and more as a utilisation of the zombie as a utilitarian antagonist that facilitates and permits the pleasures of violence and fantasy in video game play. Beginning with the Resident Evil and Left 4 Dead series of games I examine the way that games necessarily update the notion zombie as mass antagonist via the need to vary gameplay activity through different styles of adversary for players. At the same time I will demonstrate that, far from simply being the province of the survival horror genre, the zombie appears across an array of game forms, game cultures and game productions. The zombie highlights the participatory nature of game culture in the array of zombie 'mods' that users create to transform existing games into zombie based games, in particular in relation to titles such as the Call of Duty series. At the other end of the production spectrum the zombie features heavily in the little studied area of online flash games where the zombie can be found in a variety of game genres and forms. The zombie here often operates as a pastiche of popular zombie narratives in survival games (The Last Stand), parodic engagements with zombie conventions (Jetpacks and Zombies) or play with the notion of zombie pandemics (the Infectionator games). Here I situate the zombie game as a aesthetic genre that works to provide an easily understandable context for such interactive genres as survival horror, text adventures, shooting games, physics games and driving games, with the popularity of these enough to drive numerous dedicated hosting and link sites such as zombiegames.net. The pastiche element of these games extends into gamers social engagement with games. Online debates over the the appropriate actions or preparation for a zombie holocaust are commonplace on the internet in such spaces as Zombieresearch.net. Whilst many of these sites feature decidedly tongue in cheek engagement with the notion of the zombie apocalypse, the users of fora for games like Left 4 Dead and Dead Island tend to debate this directly in the terms of the games themselves, discussing their relative merits or realism. Some of these games also highlight the specific pleasures of identifying the zombie as protagonist of sorts. In discussing this I will return to online gaming and the Left 4 Dead games in which players may compete online as part of the zombie horde. Such games raise major questions for the issues of identification and immersion that are said to be at the centre of the game experience. I will also explore the parodic pleasures of many flash games that situate the player in the role of spreading zombie infections. Throughout this article I aim to demonstrate that the zombie in game culture is less a cultural metaphor than a combination of utilitarian antagonist and a persistent aesthetic; a means of providing style or pleasure to many games that relies on the intertextual and flexible nature of the zombie as popular cultural phenomenon.
    • We will not disrupt your education.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (University of Leeds, 2011)