• ‘Queering’ the speaking subject in Sarah Waters’s The Little Stranger

      Bishton, Joanne; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012)
    • Rachel Heller: pastels and other works.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Doswell Gallery, 2017-08)
      Catalogue introduction.
    • Re-imagining Bertolt Brecht, redefining British Theatre: Oladipo Agboluaje's Mother Courage

      Kasule, Samuel; University of Derby (Adonis & Abbey Publishers Ltd., 2016)
      Since 1979, among significant productions of Mother Courage that have been staged with predominantly black casts are included: Ntozake Shange’s successful American production staged on May 13, 1980 that sets the play at the American frontier during the Reconstruction period of the late nineteenth century; Joanitta Bewulira-Wandera’s Maama Nalukalala Ne’zzade Lye (Mother Courage and Her Children),first staged at the National Theatre, Kampala in 2009, which also toured in United Kingdom, U.S.A and South Africa; and Oladipo Agboluaje’s Mother Courage first produced at Nottingham Playhouse on 6 February 2004. An analysis of these adaptation, each relating to its political and social context, suggests that by constructing a link between the past and present theatrically, the playwrights are demonstrating that memory and political resistance are alive in theatre and continue to inform and shape dramatic works. Agboluaje’s reworked Mother Courage is a good reminder of the ‘classical’ text as a complex shifting concept acknowledged and used in various ways.
    • Re-odorization, disease and emotion in mid-nineteenth century England

      Tullett, William; University of Derby (Cambridge University Press, 2018-10-08)
      This article argues that smell’s place in nineteenth-century medicine and public health was distinctly ambiguous. Standard narratives in the history of smell argue that smell became less important in this period whilst also arguing that urban spaces were deodorized. The causal motor for the latter shift is medical theories about odour and miasma. By contrast, this article argues that sanitary practices of circulation, ventilation, and disinfection proceeded despite, not because of, medical attitudes to smell. Surgeons and physicians argued that odours were no indicator of disease causing matter and distrusted the use of smell because of its subjective qualities and resistance to linguistic definition. Yet these qualities made smell all the more powerful in sanitary literature, where it was used to generate a powerful emotional effect on readers. Histories of smell need to attend not just to deodorization but re-odorization; the disjuncture between practices of smelling and their textual or visual representation; and chronologies that track the shelving and re-deploying of ways of sensing in different times, places, and communities rather than tracking the de novo emergence of a modern western sensorium. In mid nineteenth-century England smell retained its power, but that power now came from its rhetorical rather than epistemological force.
    • Recalling the structure.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Spirit Duplicator, 2017)
      Part of the collaborative archaeology of the imaginary building excavated for the book.
    • Relevance theory, syntax and literary narrative.

      MacMahon, Barbara; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014)
    • Representing camp: Constructing macaroni masculinity in eighteenth century visual satire

      Gowrley, Freya; University of Edinburgh (University of South Florida Tampa, 2019-05-06)
      This article asks how ‘Camp,’ as defined in Sontag’s 1964 essay, ‘Notes on Camp,’ might provide a valuable framework for the analysis of late eighteenth-century satirical prints, specifically those featuring images of the so-called ‘macaroni.’ Discussing a number of satirical prints and contemporary writings on the macaroni, the article reads them against Sontag’s text in order to establish its utility as a critical framework for understanding the images’ complex relationship of content, form, and function.
    • Researching surviving cancer and sexuality using visual methods: a reflection on research rationale and negotiating ethical issues

      Hammond, Natalie; Cheeseman, Matthew; Chantry, Andrew; Peng, Guo Chao Alex; Manchester Metropolitan University; Sheffield University (Policy Press, 2015-11-01)
      This article offers an account of incorporating visual methods into a research framework inspired by graphic medicine, where comics are used in patient care. We conducted interviews, focused on sexual wellbeing, with 12 leukaemia survivors. The findings from these interviews were transformed into visual representations. We outline how our study was guided by feminist research principles and reflect on the tension between the flexibility that visual methods require and the rigidity of National Health Service ethical regulations
    • Review: Theatre, performance and new media in Africa by Susan Arndt

      Bishton, Joanne; University of Derby (Adonis & Abbey Publishers Ltd., 2008)
    • The rhizomatic West: representing the American West in a transnational, global Media Age

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nebraska PressOutsider, 2008)
    • The rise of the citizen author: Writing within social media

      Johnson, Miriam J.; Oxford Brookes University (Springer, 2017-03-03)
      The concept of the citizen author is defined and explored within the publishing industry. In order to understand what positions the citizen author currently, and potentially could, hold it begins with a historical view of their rise, including concepts of their eighteenth century antecedents. But the focus of this research is on their growth alongside that of social media platforms. This allows for drawing out relationships between genre fiction, publishers, and the citizen author, which provides a more full understanding of the power dynamics involved when publishers, social media, and the citizen authors mix in the current industry climate.
    • The rise of the comics künstlerroman, or, the limits of comics acceptance: the depiction of comics creators in the work of Michael Chabon and Emily St. John Mandel

      King, Daniel; University of Derby (Open Library of the Humanities, 2018-12-28)
      The künstlerroman is a genre with a long and celebrated past. From Bret Easton Ellis’ Lunar Park (2005) to John Irving’s The World According to Garp (1978) and Saul Bellow’s Humboldt’s Gift (1975), the genre has occupied a prominent place in bestseller lists and awards shortlists. The enduring popularity and continued critical celebration of the künstlerroman makes it all the more striking that, since the turn of the millennium a new kind of author-protagonist has emerged — the graphic-novelist-protagonist. This move not only inducts graphic novelists into this existing — and prestigious — literary genre, it also draws them into the same struggle for recognition in which other novelist-protagonists have long been involved. Drawing on the recent examples of Michael Chabon’s The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay (2000) and Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven (2014), in this article I argue that there is a clear move toward the serious discussion of comics and comics creators in contemporary literature, an increasing willingness to talk about comics and their makers that is marked by a surprising faith in the fitness of comics as a mode of self-expression and a recognition of the clear kinship between prose authors and graphic novelists.
    • Roundtable: (Re)presenting the archive.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (ArchiveJournal.net, 2014-03)
    • Route 57 issue 11: the feisty font review

      Cheeseman, Matthew; Ladkin, Sam; Lehóczky, Ágnes; Levick, Carmen; Morris, Paula; Piette, Adam; University of Sheffield (Spirit Duplicator, 2015)
      The creative writing journal of the University of Sheffield. Featuring over fifty writers in non-fiction, poetry, fiction and drama. Ágnes Lehóczky is the poetry editor and Paula Morris the fiction editor.
    • Route 57 issue 12: if anything younger

      Cheeseman, Matthew; Honor Gavin, Alice; Kindellan, Michael; Lehóczky, Ágnes; Zerihan, Rachel; University of Sheffield (Spirit Duplicator, 2016)
      A second edited volume of the creative writing journal. Featuring over fifty writers in non-fiction, poetry, fiction and drama. Ágnes Lehóczky is the poetry editor and Honor Gavin the fiction editor.
    • Route 57 issue 13: don’t add up

      Cheeseman, Matthew; Honor Gavin, Alice; Kindellan, Michael; Lehóczky, Ágnes; Zerihan, Rachel; University of Sheffield (Spirit Duplicator, 2017)
      A third edited volume of the creative writing journal. Featuring over fifty writers in non-fiction, poetry, fiction and drama. Ágnes Lehóczky was the poetry editor, Honor Gavin the fiction editor and Michael Kindellan the non-fiction editor.
    • 'Sedimented histories' and 'embodied legacies': Creating an evaluative framework for understanding public engagement with the First World War

      Allwork Larissa; University of Derby (UCL IOE Press, 2020-02-01)
      This article reflects on the development of a new methodological framework for the evaluation of the impact of the Centre for Hidden Histories, one of the Arts and Humanities Research Council's First World War Engagement Centres. It shows how through evaluative processes such as academic and community partner Shared Experience Workshops, and community-focused Reflection Workshops, the historical, social, cultural and economic benefits of the centre can be highlighted. It also demonstrates how public engagement in these community history projects has resulted in the identification of new 'embodied legacies' (Facer and Enright, 2016) and heretofore marginalized 'sedimented histories' (Lloyd and Moore, 2015). These lessons in evaluation can be taken forward to inform future national commemorative moments, such as the centenary of the Second World War.
    • Shared futures: Early career academics in English studies

      Watkins, Stephen; Jones, Clara; Egan, Clare; English, Elizabeth; Ras, Ilse A.; Kings College London; Lancaster University; Cardiff Metropolitan University, Wales; University of Leeds; University of Southampton (Boydell and Brewer Limited, 2018-10)
      The study of English literature, language, culture and creative writing is an important and dynamic enterprise. English: Shared Futures celebrates the discipline's intellectual strength, diversity and creativity, explores its futures in the nations of the UK and across the world, and brings together the huge scholarly, cultural and social energy of the biggest subject in the Arts and Humanities in Higher and in Secondary education: the most staff, the most students. It represents the synergies produced when practitioners and students from across the discipline come together, and aims to enable new understanding of the challenges that the discipline faces within schools and universities, the vital cultural and political role that English plays, and a renewed appreciation of the intellectual vitality and commitment of its scholars and students. Overall, it demonstrates the rich ecosystem of a subject crucial to social, cultural, and economic well-being, and offers ways in which its vitality can be ensured in the face of new challenges within and beyond the academy.
    • Showman of the screen: Joseph E. Levine and his revolutions in film promotion.

      McKenna, Anthony Thomas; University of Derby (University Press of Kentucky, 23/09/2016)
      Joseph E. Levine was one of the most recognisable figures in post-War American cinema; he pioneered saturation opening techniques, revolutionised art-film marketing, and was hugely successful as a producer. He dealt in every conceivable type of film, from arthouse to exploitation to blockbusters, and became the famous film promoter in America. Showman of the Screen is the first book to fully investigate Levine's life and work, detailing his life and extraordinary career in the film industry, and focussing on what he called his "peculiar talent" for movie exploitation and showmanship. Based on extensive archival research and interviews with many of Levine's collaborators, this book positions Levine as the most versatile film promoter, and self-promoter, of his generation. Showman of the Screen details Levine's tough upbringing in the slums of Boston, and his subsequent journey from being provincial movie exhibitor to becoming the best-known movie showman in America. The book also shows how Levine was able to capitalise on emerging cultural trends, whilst also maintaining his reputation as a maverick by fiercely guarding his independence and deliberately provoking condemnations from cultural commentators. This book acts as a corrective to the many histories of post-War American cinema that either ignore or underestimate Levine's achievements and influence. His multifarious appetites ensured that his presence was felt in all genres, and that is influence is still with us today is testament to his position as one of the most important pioneering figures in America post-War cinema.