• Old ways, new ways: Theatre artists peopling the media in Uganda

      Kasule, Samuel; University of Derby (African Theatre Association, 2018)
    • On going out and the experience of students.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018)
      Proposes a model for undergraduate culture in the night-time economy, mapping three stages from an HEI-centric culture into a heterogeneous culture and finally a homogenous culture, as youth culture and the night-time economy develop through the twentieth century.
    • On rigidity, Reus and Reich.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (2016)
    • On the water

      Cheeseman, Matthew; Cheeseman, Matthew; Southampton Solent University (Solent Press, 2017-04)
      On The Water is a collection of prose, non-fiction, performance writing and poetry, which has been written and assembled by writers from Southampton. The book is arranged to take the reader on a journey. It's not organised into sections of prose or poetry but from the feel of the pieces. We begin with the most emotional and personal pieces and end with the most universal and abstract. This is our own interpretation of being 'on the water'. I wonder what the woman whose voice is blared through loudspeakers across the country is like herself. I wonder if she's even alive, I wonder how she'd feel knowing her voice announced deaths a dozen times a day in the most loosely veiled code commuters know. I wonder how many voices break a year to her voice.
    • On the water.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; Southampton Solent University (Solent Press, 2017)
      A creative writing journal for Southampton Solent University, featuring the work of staff, students and local residents. It was designed through collaboration with Go! Grafik and students.
    • Only a "scrap of paper": The prison reading of British conscientious objectors, 1916-1919

      Feely, Catherine; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)
    • The Orrery/The Orrery: between image and object

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (2012)
    • Palgrave advances in John Clare studies

      Kovesi, Simon; Lafford, Erin; Oxford Brookes University; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020-09-18)
      Contributes to ongoing conversations about John Clare's work while offering new perspectives and directions on Clare scholarship, in an accessible writing style Serves as both a useful introduction to Clare and his work for students that are new to it, and a rich resource for scholars already working in the area Essays look at interdisciplinary topics including ecocriticism, environmental humanities, medical humanities, and posthumanism Features essays from established and early career scholars Is comprehensive in its coverage of popular and new topics in Clare studies.
    • Past and future of science fiction theatre

      Callow, Christos Jr; Gray, Susan; Birkbeck, University of London (2014)
      The article focuses on the past history and future developments of science fiction theatre. It reports that science fiction theatre has existed unofficially since the 19th century and discusses several theatrical plays including "R.U.R," "Back to Methuselah," and "Endgame". It further mentions that science fiction theatre concerns with the impact of technology on our lives and is also capable of providing importance to theatre and science fictional culture in future.
    • Patient and clinician engagement with health information in the primary care waiting room: A mixed methods case study

      Penry Williams, Cara; Elliott, Kristine; Gall, Jane; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; University of Melbourne (Victoria, Australia) (Page Press, 2019-03-11)
      Background. Primary care waiting rooms can be sites of health promotion and health literacy development through the provision of readily accessible health information. To date, few studies have considered patient engagement with televised health messages in the waiting room, nor have studies investigated whether patients ask their clinicians about this information. The aim of this study was therefore to examine patient (or accompanying person) and clinician engagement with waiting room health information, including televised health messages. Design and methods. The mixed methods case study was undertaken in a regional general practice in Victoria, Australia, utilising patient questionnaires, waiting room observations, and clinician logbooks and interviews. The qualitative data were analysed by content analysis; the questionnaire data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Results. Patients engaged with a range of health information in the waiting room and reportedly received health messages from this information. 44% of the questionnaire respondents (33 of 74) reported watching the television health program, and half of these reported receiving a take home health message from this source. Only one of the clinicians (N=9) recalled a patient asking about the televised health program. Conclusions. The general practice waiting room remains a site where people engage with the available health information, with a televised health ‘infotainment’ program receiving most attention from patients. Our study showed that consumption of health information was primarily passive and tended not to activate patient discussions with clinicians. Future studies could investigate any link between the health infotainment program and behaviour change.
    • Pauper inventories, social relations, and the nature of poor relief under the old poor law, England, c. 1601–1834.

      Harley, Joseph; University of Derby (Cambridge University Press, 2018-06-13)
      ABSTRACT During the old poor law, many paupers had their possessions inventoried and later taken by authorities as part of the process of obtaining poor relief. Historians have known about this for decades, yet little research has been conducted to establish how widespread the system was, what types of parishioners had their belongings inventoried and why, what the legal status of the practice was, and how it affected social relations in the parish. Using nearly 450 pauper inventories, this article examines these historiographical lacunae. It is argued that the policy had no legal basis and came from local practices and policies. The system is found to be more common in the south and east of England than in the north, and it is argued that the practice gradually became less common from the late eighteenth century. The inventorying of paupers’ goods often formed one of the many creative ways in which parishes helped the poor before 1770, as it guaranteed many paupers assistance until death. However, by the late eighteenth century the appraising of paupers’ goods was closely tied to a negative shift in the attitudes of larger ratepayers and officials, who increasingly wanted to dissuade people from applying for assistance and reduce expenditure.
    • Pax: variations

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (IMPress, 2000)
      a novel
    • Photocinema:the creative edges of photography and film

      Campbell, Neil; Cramerotti, Alfredo; University of Derby (Intellect Books, 2013)
      Taking as its starting point the notion of photocinema—or the interplay of the still and moving image—the photographs, interviews, and critical essays in this volume explore the ways in which the two media converge and diverge, expanding the boundaries of each in interesting and unexpected ways. The book’s innovative approach to film and photography produces a hybrid “third space,” where the whole becomes much more than the sum of its individual parts, encouraging viewers to expand their perceptions to begin to understand the bigger picture. Photocinema represents a nuanced theoretical and practical exploration of the experimental cinematic techniques exemplified by artists like Wim Wenders and Hollis Frampton. In addition to new critical essays by Victor Burgin and David Campany, the book includes interviews with Martin Parr, Hannah Starkey, and Aaron Schuman and a portfolio of photographs from various new and established artists.
    • Playing and performance in Uganda: A conversation with Professor Justinian Ssalongo Tamusuza

      Kasule, Samuel; University of Derby (Adonis & Abbey Publishers Ltd., 2013-11)
    • The Playwrights’ Register

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (Yr Academi Gymreig, 1984)
    • The poet as sage, sage as poet in 1816: Aesthetics and epistemology in Percy Bysshe Shelley’s ‘Hymn to Intellectual Beauty’

      Whickman, Paul; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2016-09-02)
      Philosophy and poetry for Shelley are considered as inter-related or even interchangeable. Nevertheless, critics have often struggled to reconcile the two sides of the figure of Shelley; the Romantic poet and the Enlightenment-inspired sceptical philosopher. If, in a Lockean sense, language is both an imperfect conveyor of knowledge and, as for Thomas Paine, the tool of tyranny, then this raises the question of how Shelley is to operate as a poet. Focusing on ‘Hymn to Intellectual Beauty’, this essay considers not only how Shelley’s philosophy is thematically an aspect of the poem but also how this manifests itself aesthetically. The philosophical problem of the relationship between language and knowledge, this essay contends, is an aesthetic one. Aesthetics and epistemology therefore intersect in the poem, overcoming the perceived tension between Shelley as poet and Shelley as philosopher.
    • Poland translated: post-Communist writing in Poland: a survey

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (Springer Verlag, 2010)
    • The Politics of literature: Poland 1945-89

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (University of Wales Press, 1989)
      This study explores the relationship between literature and politics. It asks what literature can tell us about politics, and it does so by exploring Polish literary-political culture in the years 1945-89. During these years the Communist Party, for all its opposite intent, preserved the power of the word and the moral and political position of writers at a time when in western Europe and America writers were no longer taken very seriously as political commentators. This was a period when writers in Poland occupied a position of great moral authority. Many believed that, in spite of Soviet power, an independent Polish socialism was a possibility, and that even if they were not able to shake off the power of Moscow they might still be able to turn communism into a force for good.
    • Popular experience and cultural representation of the Great War, 1914-1918

      Larsen, Ruth M.; Whitehead, Ian; University of Derby (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2017-09-01)
      This book considers the diversity of the experiences and legacies of the First World War, looking at the actions of those who fought, those who remained at home and those who returned from the arena of war. It examines Edwardian ideals of gender and how these shaped social expectations of the roles to be played by men and women with regards to the national cause. It looks at men’s experiences of combat and killing on the Western Front, exploring the ways in which masculine gender ideals and male social relationships moulded their experience of battle. It shows how the women of the controversial White Feather campaign exploited traditional ideas of heroism and male duty in war to embarrass men into volunteering for military service. The book also examines children’s toys and recreation, underlining how play helped to promote patriotic values in children and thus prepared boys and girls for the respective roles they might be called upon to make in war. A strong sense of British identity and a faith in the superiority of British values, customs and institutions underpinned the collective war effort. The book looks at how, even in captivity at the Ruhleben internment camp, the British gave expression to this identity. The book emphasises the extent to which this was a conflict in which Britain sought to defend and even extend its imperial dominion. It also discusses how different political and cultural agendas have shaped the way in which Britain has remembered the War. As such, the book reflects the diversity of popular experience in the War, both at home and in the empire. Britain’s entry into the War in 1914 helped to ensure that it became a truly global conflict. The contributors here draw attention to the significant social, cultural and political legacies for Britain and her empire of a conflict which, one hundred years later, continues to be the subject of considerable controversy.
    • Popular music and the breast.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Sheffield (Rowman and Littlefield, 2014-09)
      This A-to-Z encyclopedia explores the historical magnitude and cultural significance of the breast over time and around the world. My entry looks at how the breast is mediated on LP covers.