• ‘I didn’t know you could read': questioning the legitimacy of Kim Kardashian-West’s status as a cultural and literary intermediary

      Marsden, Stevie; University of Leicester (Brill, 2018-11-17)
      This paper considers the reactions to the announcement of the Kim Kardashian-West Book Klub and explores how this episode illustrated the perceived illegitimacy of celebrities like Kardashian-West, who are commonly associated with ‘lowbrow culture’, engaging with and discussing literature, an activity that has traditionally been seen as a middlebrow endeavour. The reactions to the Kardashian-West Book Klub not only reflect issues around the status of celebrities as cultural intermediaries but also bring to the fore historical principles that have questioned the intelligence and capabilities of women readers. This paper positions the Kim Kardashian-West Book Klub within the wider historical context of women readers and book clubs and considers the prestige, or lack thereof, of celebrities who try to be cultural and literary intermediaries. The paper also considers the Kardashian-West Book Klub in relation to other major celebrity book clubs and argues that such forays into literary culture are used by some celebrities to bolster their social and cultural capital, acting first and foremost as a branch of their personal brand identity, rather than as altruistic enterprises.
    • The idea is slavery.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; Blanchard, Jake; University of Sheffield (Spirit Duplicator, 2015)
    • In absence of the smoky god.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (2014)
      Essay to accompany Matt Stokes' solo show at Site.
    • In advance of the broken image: Gerhard Richter and Gustav Metzger’s confrontations with Nazi criminality

      Allwork Larissa; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019-11-25)
      This chapter focuses on Gerhard Richter’s Uncle Rudi (1965) and Mr Heyde (1965) and Gustav Metzger’s Historic Photographs series (1995–1998) in order to present a new interpretation of how these artists perform the photograph in order to provoke cultural rather than legal confrontations with Nazi criminality. Rejecting Holocaust representational pieties in favour of the reinterpretation of the Duchampian ‘Readymade’ in the case of Richter, and Dada’s anti-aesthetics of destruction and revulsion in Metzger’s, this chapter will argue that Richter’s oblique pose of the ‘anti-ideological artist’ and Metzger’s more overt performance of the ‘subversive social activist’ are part of important social and cultural processes of confronting Nazi criminality. These types of cultural reckonings were recognized as important in David Cesarani’s edited collection, After Eichmann: Collective Memory and the Holocaust after 1961 (2005).
    • In the dead of the night.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Sheffield (Lawrence and Wishart, 2012-02)
      A creative non-fiction essay on the role of the night-time economy in youth culture. There have been over 150,000 downloads of this book.
    • The internet science fiction theatre database

      Callow, Christos Jr; University of Derby (2018)
      The Internet Science Fiction Theatre Database (ISFTDB) of Cyborphic primarily consists of contemporary plays, i.e. published and/or produced in the 21st Century. Some key texts of sci-fi theatre from the 20th Century are included in a separate section. For a more complete list of 20th Century science fiction plays, see Ralph Willingham’s appendix in his 1993 book Science Fiction and the Theatre. The database is created by Christos Callow Jr, playwright and lecturer at the University of Derby.
    • Interrogating Europe's voids of memory: trauma theory and Holocaust remembrance between the national and the transnational.

      Allwork Larissa; University of Derby (Journal of Fondazione CDEC, 2016-12-16)
      Reflecting on the research process for 'Holocaust Remembrance between the National and the Transnational' (HRNT), which explores and analyzes the significance of the European and global politics of the commemoration of the Holocaust and Nazi-era crimes in the late 1990s and 2000s, this article will consider the influence of the intellectual context of trauma theory for this book. It will offer a response to the increasing critique of Eurocentric trauma theory which developed during the period spent researching the Stockholm International Forum (SIF 2000) and the first decade of the Task Force for International Co-operation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research (ITF, now the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance, IHRA). This article will discuss how a revised trauma theory, along the lines suggested by scholars such as Joshua Pederson, continues to offer important possibilities for European studies of the histories and memories of the Holocaust in singular and comparative terms.
    • Introduction

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Flowers, 2003)
    • Introduction to John Gibbons

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Czech Museum of Fine Art, 2003)
    • Introduction.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Flowers, 2016-02)
      Catalogue introduction.
    • Introduction: the lives and legacies of David Cesarani

      Allwork Larissa; Pistol, Rachel; University of Derby; Kings College London (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019-11-25)
      This introduction to the edited collection ‘The Jews, the Holocaust and the Public’ focuses on David Cesarani as autobiographer and biographer. It comprises a brief introduction to Cesarani’s life in academia, his own autobiographical essay and his interest in biography as an academic form, via his studies of Benjamin Disraeli, Arthur Koestler and Adolf Eichmann. This chapter will present the new argument that these three figures can be interpreted as emblematic of three key overlapping themes in Cesarani’s broader research interests: Anglo-Jewish history; migration, minorities and nationalisms; and the Holocaust its history, the prosecution of the perpetrators and its ongoing legacies. It is these themes that comprise a uniquely ‘Cesaranian’ interdisciplinary approach to the Holocaust. It is also these themes, sometimes separately, and at other times in combination, that will animate the considerations of the chapters in this volume for the ‘Holocaust and its Contexts’.
    • Jan Kochanowski: Polish poet

      Tighe, Carl (2012-09)
    • Jane Austen free indirect style, gender and interiority in literary fiction

      MacMahon, Barbara; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018-05-21)
      In this chapter I suggest that Jane Austen’s use of free indirect style has a far-reaching legacy in terms of establishing the form as central to a sense of literariness in prose fiction. More particularly, I argue that Austen’s use of language metarepresents the thoughts of female characters as a dynamic process of understanding themselves and their worlds. This coincides with a more general perception, construction and performance of ‘feminine’ thought and language use as hesitant, equivocal and spontaneous. I explore the influence of Austen’s style with close analysis and comparison of passages of interiority in Austen’s Mansfield Park, Katherine Mansfield’s short story ‘Millie’ and Monica Ali’s novel Brick Lane.
    • Jane Austen, free indirect style, gender and interiority in literary fiction.

      MacMahon, Barbara; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018-11-12)
      Austen is known for her development of free indirect style as a narrative form. Free indirect style is a fusion of narrator and character perspectives, a peculiar linguistic manipulation of deictic centres which allows for a semi-experiential representation of a character’s perceptions, thoughts and experiences. The style does not tell, it shows, and in doing so it invites close engagement with and empathetic reading of character, at the same time as maintaining the distance of a third-person narrative. This can be a powerful narrative device with complex effects.
    • The Jews, the Holocaust and the public: the legacies of David Cesarani

      Allwork Larissa; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019-11-25)
      This book explores the work and legacy of Professor David Cesarani OBE, a leading British scholar and expert on Jewish history who helped to shape Holocaust research, remembrance and education in the UK. It is a unique combination of chapters produced by researchers, curators and commemoration activists who either worked with and/or were taught by the late Cesarani. The chapters in this collection consider the legacies of Cesarani’s contribution to the discipline of history and the practice of public history. The contributors offer reflections on Cesarani’s approach and provide new insights into the study of Anglo-Jewish history, minorities and nationalisms, Nazi war crimes and their legacies and the history and public legacies of the Holocaust. This edited collection comprises 17 chapters (approx' 365 pages) that have been curated by Dr Larissa Allwork and Dr Rachel Pistol. As well as working with Pistol to select and copy edit all the chapters, Allwork co-wrote the 'introduction' with Pistol (c. 6000 words), proposing that there is a distinctly 'Cesaranian' interdisciplinary approach to the study of the Holocaust. Allwork also submitted two further chapters to the collection. The first, a sole authored chapter offering an original interpretation of Gerhard Richter and Gustav Metzger's artistic confrontations with Nazi criminality (c. 10,000). The second, a transcript of an interview conducted with Cesarani in 2009 (c. 7,500 words). This includes an introductory section which self-reflexively grounds the interview and is fully footnoted and referenced.
    • John Clare, herbalism, and elegy

      Lafford, Erin; University of Derby (Edinburgh University Press, 2020)
      Discussions of Clare’s engagement with botany often trace his fraught relationship with taxonomy, exploring his admiration for common names over the ‘dark system’ of Linnaean classification. This essay expands understanding of Clare’s botanical imagination by considering how he brings his botanical ‘taste’ to bear on the flower as a key figure of elegiac consolation. I refocus attention on his formative preference for pre-Linnaean herbalism and explore how it informs his engagement with elegiac tradition and imagery, especially in relation to Gray’s ‘Elegy’. I attend to how herbalism is brought into relationship with poetic representations of the floral, focussing especially on the connection between Clare’s preference for herbals and Elizabeth Kent’s Flora Domestica. I then discuss ‘Cauper Green’ and ‘The Village Doctress’ (Clare’s most sustained poetic discussions of herbalism) as elegies that try to reconcile the finite temporality of human life with the regenerative life cycles of plants and their flowers.
    • The journal of imaginary research. Volume 3.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; Guccione, Kay; University of Derby (NATCECT, 2018)
    • Karl Marx's Capital and transatlantic radical book-trade networks in the early twentieth century

      Feely, Catherine; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017)
      The book trade historically tended to operate in a spirit of co-operation as well as competition. Networks between printers, publishers, booksellers and related trades existed at local, regional, national and international levels and were a vital part of the business of books for several centuries. This collection of essays examines many aspects of the history of book-trade networks, in response to the recent ‘spatial turn’ in history and other disciplines. Contributors come from various backgrounds including history, sociology, business studies and English literature.