• Addressing Ill Health: Sickness and Retirement in the Victorian Post Office.

      Green, David R; Brown, Douglas H L; McIlvenna, Kathleen; University of Derby (Oxford Academic., 2018-11-15)
      This article explores ill health and retirement in the Victorian Post Office. Compared to other branches of the Civil Service, ill health was of greater importance as a cause of retirement. Post Office doctors kept careful records of sickness absence, which rose over the period for all workers. These records were also used to determine if employees should be pensioned off on grounds of ill health. Employees in different sections of the Post Office experienced varying levels of sickness depending on their place of employment and the type of work undertaken. Feminisation of the workforce also affected the prevalence of sickness absences, especially in London. Place of work was an important influence on the pattern of sickness with urban areas having higher levels of sickness than rural districts, with distinct sets of conditions linked to each.
    • Afterword: from affect to landscape and back

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Ashgate Publishing Ltd., 2015)
    • Alternative schooling

      Flower, Annie; Cottle, Vanessa; University of Derby (Pearson Education Limited, 2011)
      This chapter provides you with a general introduction to approaches to education and school curricula by considering examples of schools from Europe and the USA, which have a role in providing alternative curricula to the English National Curriculum and also considers educational policy.
    • Amongst Barbarian: Ovid, the Classics and creative writing

      McCrory, Moy; University of Derby (Routledge, 2010-09)
      Despite still being viewed as a non-legitimate subject, Creative Writing has injected life into areas once considered essential to an education, but now under threat in many universities. At degree level it has created an opportunity to re-engage with the classics by its insistence on its own history, while its non-traditional methodologies provide a different way for students to engage with early texts. Ovid's Metamorphoses lends itself to Creative Writing development. Such students, who are used to engaging with a subject practically, will have been equipped with the tools necessary to work with this. Their creative mindset allows the main work of reinterpretation necessary for the study of such early stories. The study for clues which point towards earlier methods (repetition, formal patterns, framework structures) which occur in such primary literature allows students to realise the evolution of a story, and understand that this is never a static process, but one of continuous engagement which the Metamorphoses above all others, seems to welcome.
    • Archivist, cataloguer, historian.

      Flint, Alison Claire; University of Derby (Women's History Network, 2015-09)
      This paper investigates the interrelationships between the nineteenth-century cataloguer, the twenty-first-century archivist and the historian, by focusing on the letter. Taking up Steven Fischer’s maxim to look beyond the obvious the paper considers the little used and un-investigated correspondence of the Ogston Estate families. A critical evaluation of the collection has indicated that this group of records can deliver more than a concise male orientated genealogical record or history of a Derbyshire country estate. The analysis questions why the majority of the surviving familiar letters in the Ogston collection were written by women, principally the wives, mothers and daughters of the Turbutt family. However, what makes this collection ever more interesting for the historian and most importantly to this study is it offers a unique insight into the methodologies adopted by one nineteenth-century family archivist, Edith Sophia Turbutt. Edith Sophia Hall married into the Turbutt family in 1879; twenty-five years later in 1904 Edith Sophia began to catalogue and record the history of her adopted family, the Turbutt family. The paper questions the nature and purpose behind Edith Sophia Turbutt’s agenda in cataloguing the ancestral correspondence of the Turbutt family line and asks was it a gender related pastime. It explores both the negative and positive impact of the methodologies used by Edith Sophia Turbutt in cataloguing the letters into bundles comprising individual family members rather than chronologically as a whole and asks what as a result is lost or gained. The paper investigates whether letter questions remain unanswered or replies appear as simple unrelated fact or if the continuity through the generations and extended family connections becomes distorted or indeed lost. In addition it inquires if Edith Sophia’s methods were the fashionable norm and further explores how and why gentry families were managing their own histories. The paper further argues that the modern archivist who accepts the early nineteenth-century cataloguing without attesting the dates or contents is not only compounding any past inaccuracies but adds further to the distortion of the evidence as whole, and as such, it considers the impact of such action on future generations of the family, and the historian; it goes on to question whether in recreating an/the imagined past the family historian or archivist past, present and future is guilty of misrepresenting the true nature of the facts.
    • "An assemblage of habits": D. J. Waldie and Neil Campbell—a suburban conversation

      Waldie, D. J.; Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (Utah State, 2011)
    • Atlantis.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Sheffield; Go! Grafik; Pringle, Mat (Spirit Duplicator, 2015)
      An edited volume of eighteen pairs of artists and writers collaborating on illustrated creative work on the theme of Atlantis. I included a range of writers at different stages of their careers, from the public philosopher Angie Hobbs to undergraduate students. Cathy Shrank, Adam Piette, John Miller, Fabienne Collignon, Astrid Alben and Ágnes Lehóczky all contribute. The book is a two colour risograph print.
    • bricolage, poetics, spacing

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI), 2017-11-28)
      Contemporary concern for bricolage both transcends and supersedes de Certeau’s important intervention that resituated the term as actions undertaken in everyday life. In particular, he engaged the notion of bricolage in ways that presented tactics, evasions, resistances, ruses and even tricks in his consideration of everyday life as practiced. Whilst these considerations may be read, as indeed he asserted, as ‘making do’, there are further possibilities of this term. For example, bricolage may be considered to ‘occur’. In this we may take the anthropologist Hallam and Ingold’s grasp of creativity as something in our bodily and mental response to situations, calm, anxious and otherwise; responding to the detail of a situation, a required or desired action.
    • The British Espernatist 10.

      Bareham, Paul; Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Spirit Duplicator, 2018)
    • British invasion: The crosscurrents of musical influence

      Philo, Simon; University of Derby (Rowman and Littlefield, 2014-11)
      Before The Beatles landed on American shores in February 1964 only two British acts had topped the Billboard singles chart. In the first quarter of 1964, however, the Beatles alone accounted for sixty percent of all recorded music sold in the United States; in 1964 and 1965 British acts occupied the number one position for 52 of the 104 weeks; and from 1964 through to 1970, the Rolling Stones, Herman’s Hermits, the Dave Clark Five, the Animals, the Kinks, the Hollies, the Yardbirds and the Who placed more than one hundred and thirty songs on the American Top Forty. In The British Invasion: The Crosscurrents of Musical Influence, Simon Philo illustrates how this remarkable event in cultural history disrupted and even reversed pop culture’s flow of influence, goods, and ideas—orchestrating a dramatic turn-around in the commercial fortunes of British pop in North America that turned the 1960s into “The Sixties.” Focusing on key works and performers, The British Invasion tracks the journey of this musical phenomenon from peripheral irrelevance through exotic novelty into the heart of mainstream rock. Throughout, Philo explores how and why British music from the period came to achieve such unprecedented heights of commercial, artistic, and cultural dominance. The British Invasion: The Crosscurrents of Musical Influence will appeal to fans, students and scholars of popular music history—indeed anyone interested in understanding the fascinating relationship between popular music and culture.
    • British urban trees: A social and cultural history, 1800-1914

      Elliott, Paul A.; University of Derby (White Horse Press, 2016)
      Whether we consider the great London Planes which are now the largest trees in many British urban streets, the exotic ornamentals from across the globe flourishing in numerous private gardens, the stately trees of public parks and squares or the dense colourful foliage of suburbia, the impact of trees and arboriculture upon modern towns and their ecosystems is clear. From the formal walks and squares of the Georgian town to Victorian tree-lined boulevards and commemorative oaks, trees are the organic statuary of modern urban society, providing continuity yet constantly changing through the day and over the seasons. Interfacing between humans and nature, connecting the continents and reaching back and forward through time to past and future generations, they have come to define urbanity while simultaneously evoking nature and the countryside. This book is the first major study of British urban arboriculture between 1800 and 1914 and draws upon fresh approaches in geographical, urban and environmental history. It makes a major contribution to our understanding of where, how and why trees grew in British towns in the period, the social and cultural impact of these and the attitudes taken towards them. CONTENTS Chapter One. Private Urban Garden Trees Chapter Two. Trees in Public Parks and Gardens Chapter Three. Trees in the Victorian Cemetery Chapter Four. Trees in Victorian Nottingham c. 1840–1880 Chapter Five. Victorian and Edwardian Glasgow Chapter Six. Towards a National Capital: Cardiff Chapter Seven. Urban Trees and Smoke Pollution Chapter Eight. Trees for Heath and Pleasure: Spa and Resort Towns
    • Bruno Schulz.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Boiler House Press, 2018-07)
      A creative non-fiction memoir of a lost friend who introduced me to Bruno Schulz. This is a chapter in a pro-EU anthology which was published on the anniversary of Brexit in response to surges of violent British nationalism and political paranoia. Edited by JT Welsch and Ágnes Lehóczky the anthology marks the vital contribution of non-UK-born writers to the UK's poetry culture. Wretched Strangers brings together innovative writing from around the globe, celebrating the irreducible diversity such work brings to ‘British’ poetry. While documenting the challenges faced by writers from elsewhere, these pieces offer hopeful re-conceptions of ‘shared foreignness’ as Lila Matsumoto describes it, and the ‘peculiar state of exiled human,’ in Fawzi Karim’s words.
    • Burning Worm

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (IMPress, 2001)
      a novel
    • 'But now we float': Cowper, air-balloons, and the poetics of flight

      Lafford, Erin; University of Oxford (The Cowper and Newton Museum, 2018-06)
    • Changing geographies and tourist scholarship.

      Crouch, David; University of Derby; Humanities, University of Derby, Derby, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (Taylor and Francis, 2017-12)
    • Clare's mutterings, murmurings, and ramblings: the sounds of health

      Lafford, Erin; University of Oxford (The John Clare Society, 2014-07)
      Clare is valued as a poet of direct communication. His poems are filled with Northamptonshire dialect that fosters an instantaneous connection to his local environment, creating an immediate sense of place though sound. Likewise, Clare’s representations of natural sounds, such as the ‘whewing’ of the pewit, the ‘swop’ of the jay bird as it flies, and the ‘chickering crickets’, have a mimetic quality that creates a direct experience of what he hears.1 Seamus Heaney grouped Clare with what he called ‘monoglot geniuses’, meaning that he had a gift for conveying through poetry a ‘univocal homeplace’ that his readers could understand without necessarily belonging to that place themselves.2 However, this idea of Clare as a poet of such direct coherency is complicated by his madness or, specifically, by his repeated usage of a vocalisation which carries connotations of madness. This essay will consider the ways that Clare represents health and madness at the level of sound, by bringing them into relationship with a mode of speaking that recurs throughout his poetry and prose: his use of muttering. It will suggest that Clare’s poetic investment in muttering and the sub-vocal register as both a personalised, therapeutic mode of self-address, and a way to foster a deep poetic relationship with his natural surroundings, comes to complicate his formal representation of health as a clear ‘strong voice’.
    • The compass of possibilities: re-mapping the suburbs of Los Angeles in the writings of D.J. Waldie

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (European Journal of American Studies, 2011-10)
      This article uses the works of the writer, memoirist, and Lakewood, California public official, D. J. Waldie to deepen our concept of “region” and to re-assess many of the stereotypical discourses associated with the American suburbs. In the fashionable parlance of Mike Davis’ City of Quartz, Los Angeles has become defined by its “suburban badlands”; however, Waldie‘s work takes a different view in which his suburban home in LA is the focus for a more complex, multi-faceted approach to post-war suburbia. Typified by his re-assessment of the suburban grid as a “compass of possibilities,” his writings encourage a more nuanced and layered view of the communities and cultures fostered in such places. His key work Holy Land is an argument about why a disregarded place, an ordinary place like suburbia, can in fact contain qualities of life that are profound and reassuring. Through examining his work in its cultural and theoretical context this article looks below the expected “grid” of suburbia to demonstrate the rich life beyond its apparent anonymity.
    • Conflict, identity and the role of the internet: the use of the internet by the Serbian intelligentsia in the 1999 conflict over Kosovo

      Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (Delta State University, 2010-04)
      This article investigates the role of the nature of electronic communications in what has been recognised as being the first Internet war. It builds upon Regis Debray's theory on the three stages of the intellectual (university, print media and television) by advocating that the Internet has become the fourth stage for the intellectual in speaking truth to power (Said).
    • Contexts, identities and consumption: Britain 1688-1815

      Larsen, Ruth M.; University of Derby (Continuum, 2009)
    • Cosmopolitan highlanders: Region and nation in Anglo-German encounters in the Himalayas, 1903-1945

      Neuhaus, Tom; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)
      Studies of national and regional identity have long been a staple of British and European historiography. In German historiography, the development of nationalism and national unification is well-charted territory, as is the importance of discourses of Heimat and Volk. The persistence of strong local and regional allegiances, particularly in the Southern German states, is equally well-known. A similar trajectory can be found in British historiography. While historians such as Linda Colley have explored the creation of a common British identity and a sense of Britishness during the eighteenth and nineteenth century, the emergence of particular notions of Englishness has attracted the attention of scholars such as Peter Mandler. All this relates to wider discussions concerning the role of the nation-state in modern history. In many ways, however, the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries were also periods of globalization with an increase in international and intercontinental travel, as well as a significant degree of mobility of ideas and goods. While this perhaps never came as a surprise to historians of Britain, who have long dealt with Britain’s engagement with the rest of the world, historians of Germany have only begun to embrace this new global history more recently. The past two decades have witnessed an increasing proliferation of studies that seek to place German history in its global context. This has left us with a picture where globalization and the ‘rise’ of the nation-state existed in tandem – a picture that at first sight can often be paradoxical, but which has also endowed us a with a more nuanced understanding of the interplay between regional, national and transnational histories. This chapter will explore this interplay by examining British and German accounts of travel to Tibet and the Himalayas, showing that allegiances to both nation and region could co-exist quite easily, and could indeed be complemented by a sense of belonging to a common humanity across regional and national boundaries. The example of British and German travellers to Tibet and the Himalayas demonstrates that interwar Europeans could at once be fiercely nationalistic, proud of their local and regional heritage, and aware of what united them with travellers from other parts of Europe and, at times, the entire world. In fact, strong regional allegiances could serve, in some cases, to enhance a feeling of connectedness across national borders.