• Amongst Barbarian: Ovid, the Classics and creative writing

      McCrory, Moy; University of Derby (Routledge, 2010-09)
      Despite still being viewed as a non-legitimate subject, Creative Writing has injected life into areas once considered essential to an education, but now under threat in many universities. At degree level it has created an opportunity to re-engage with the classics by its insistence on its own history, while its non-traditional methodologies provide a different way for students to engage with early texts. Ovid's Metamorphoses lends itself to Creative Writing development. Such students, who are used to engaging with a subject practically, will have been equipped with the tools necessary to work with this. Their creative mindset allows the main work of reinterpretation necessary for the study of such early stories. The study for clues which point towards earlier methods (repetition, formal patterns, framework structures) which occur in such primary literature allows students to realise the evolution of a story, and understand that this is never a static process, but one of continuous engagement which the Metamorphoses above all others, seems to welcome.
    • Primo Levi as storyteller: The uses of fiction, creative non-fiction and the hard to classify in Levi’s narrative of the Holocaust.

      McCrory, Moy; University of Derby (Intellect, 2013-04)
      The varied forms of short prose writing used by Primo Levi in his continued narrative of the Holocaust allows a reconsideration of him as not merely its witness, but also as its storyteller. Taking The Periodic Table ([1975] 1986) as a conscious shift in Levi’s writing direction this article examines where the fictional developments and memory collide, and attempts to assess if this produces a more memorable format in order to reveal a difficult history. Do we continue to read Levi because his honesty is greater than the bare facts, and is there such a thing as a Holocaust aesthetic?