• Digitally-social genre fiction: Citizen authors and the changing power dynamics of writing in digital, social spaces.

      Johnson, Miriam J.; University of Derby; College of Arts, Humanities and Education, University of Derby, Derby, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2018-08-09)
      The growth of digitally social media has given rise to the citizen author, as an author who actively chooses to forgo the traditional publishing model and seeks instead to share their works among communities on social platforms. Taking into account the nature of the medium on which they write, they use genre fiction as a means to push the boundaries of what is expected of a ‘book’ or narrative structure. This article shows that, by pushing back against the structure of the author-agent-publisher model, these authors engender communities around their writing and develop relationships directly with readers. These digital villages proliferate around genre writing in online spaces, creating a shifting power dynamic between the publishing industry and the writers who choose to work in these digital spaces, blurring the differential between ‘high’ and ‘low’ art and addressing the issues of gender in genre fiction.
    • On the water

      Cheeseman, Matthew; Cheeseman, Matthew; Southampton Solent University (Solent Press, 2017-04)
      On The Water is a collection of prose, non-fiction, performance writing and poetry, which has been written and assembled by writers from Southampton. The book is arranged to take the reader on a journey. It's not organised into sections of prose or poetry but from the feel of the pieces. We begin with the most emotional and personal pieces and end with the most universal and abstract. This is our own interpretation of being 'on the water'. I wonder what the woman whose voice is blared through loudspeakers across the country is like herself. I wonder if she's even alive, I wonder how she'd feel knowing her voice announced deaths a dozen times a day in the most loosely veiled code commuters know. I wonder how many voices break a year to her voice.
    • Primo Levi as storyteller: The uses of fiction, creative non-fiction and the hard to classify in Levi’s narrative of the Holocaust.

      McCrory, Moy; University of Derby (Intellect, 2013-04)
      The varied forms of short prose writing used by Primo Levi in his continued narrative of the Holocaust allows a reconsideration of him as not merely its witness, but also as its storyteller. Taking The Periodic Table ([1975] 1986) as a conscious shift in Levi’s writing direction this article examines where the fictional developments and memory collide, and attempts to assess if this produces a more memorable format in order to reveal a difficult history. Do we continue to read Levi because his honesty is greater than the bare facts, and is there such a thing as a Holocaust aesthetic?
    • Strange meetings: Moments of recognition and identification in short stories.

      McCrory, Moy; University of Derby (International Conference on the Short Story., 2017)
      In examining how both reader and writer interpret the ‘new’ through their previous understandings this questions how we use those recognition. Do we reinforce the idea of the self & the familiar or do we challenge this familiarity and reconsider how we approach the ‘other’ in our reading and authorship as writers? In re positioning the other we can consider both Orientalism and the different in western short fictions and early short tales as a reflection of the observer rather than the observed.