• Patient and clinician engagement with health information in the primary care waiting room: A mixed methods case study

      Penry Williams, Cara; Elliott, Kristine; Gall, Jane; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; University of Melbourne (Victoria, Australia) (Page Press, 2019-03-11)
      Background. Primary care waiting rooms can be sites of health promotion and health literacy development through the provision of readily accessible health information. To date, few studies have considered patient engagement with televised health messages in the waiting room, nor have studies investigated whether patients ask their clinicians about this information. The aim of this study was therefore to examine patient (or accompanying person) and clinician engagement with waiting room health information, including televised health messages. Design and methods. The mixed methods case study was undertaken in a regional general practice in Victoria, Australia, utilising patient questionnaires, waiting room observations, and clinician logbooks and interviews. The qualitative data were analysed by content analysis; the questionnaire data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Results. Patients engaged with a range of health information in the waiting room and reportedly received health messages from this information. 44% of the questionnaire respondents (33 of 74) reported watching the television health program, and half of these reported receiving a take home health message from this source. Only one of the clinicians (N=9) recalled a patient asking about the televised health program. Conclusions. The general practice waiting room remains a site where people engage with the available health information, with a televised health ‘infotainment’ program receiving most attention from patients. Our study showed that consumption of health information was primarily passive and tended not to activate patient discussions with clinicians. Future studies could investigate any link between the health infotainment program and behaviour change.
    • Addressing Ill Health: Sickness and Retirement in the Victorian Post Office.

      Green, David R; Brown, Douglas H L; McIlvenna, Kathleen; University of Derby (Oxford Academic., 2018-11-15)
      This article explores ill health and retirement in the Victorian Post Office. Compared to other branches of the Civil Service, ill health was of greater importance as a cause of retirement. Post Office doctors kept careful records of sickness absence, which rose over the period for all workers. These records were also used to determine if employees should be pensioned off on grounds of ill health. Employees in different sections of the Post Office experienced varying levels of sickness depending on their place of employment and the type of work undertaken. Feminisation of the workforce also affected the prevalence of sickness absences, especially in London. Place of work was an important influence on the pattern of sickness with urban areas having higher levels of sickness than rural districts, with distinct sets of conditions linked to each.
    • Literature 1780–1830: the Romantic Period.

      Branagh-Miscampbell, Maxine; Leonardi, Barbara; Whickman, Paul; Ward, Matthew; Halsey, Katie; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2018-10-29)
    • Laon and Cythna and The Revolt of Islam: revisions as transition.

      Whickman, Paul; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2018-10-16)
      The enforced amendments made to Laon and Cythna following its withdrawal from publication in December 1817 are generally regarded as workmanlike and prudent, sacrificing aesthetic merit in the name of compromise and self-censorship. There remain, however, few detailed readings of these modifications that go beyond subjective responses. To this end, this article offers a reading of these revisions arguing that although some are indeed functional alterations, other amendments serve thematic and aesthetic ends. One of Shelley’s most common changes, that of changing the word ‘God’ to ‘Power’, is a case in point. Since a key theme of the poem is of the collusion between political and religious tyranny, Shelley’s alteration of ‘God’ to ‘Power’ makes this connection more explicit. From this, this article concludes that these revisions signal, analogously at the very least, a transitioning point in Shelley’s thought and career. Whereas Queen Mab (1813) refers explicitly to ‘God’, later works such as Prometheus Unbound (1820) settle upon the term ‘Power’. The fact that we see Shelley move from one to the other between Laon and Cythna and The Revolt of Islam is therefore significant.
    • Re-odorization, disease and emotion in mid-nineteenth century England

      Tullett, William; University of Derby (Cambridge University Press, 2018-10)
      This article argues that smell’s place in nineteenth-century medicine and public health was distinctly ambiguous. Standard narratives in the history of smell argue that smell became less important in this period whilst also arguing that urban spaces were deodorized. The causal motor for the latter shift is medical theories about odour and miasma. By contrast, this article argues that sanitary practices of circulation, ventilation, and disinfection proceeded despite, not because of, medical attitudes to smell. Surgeons and physicians argued that odours were no indicator of disease causing matter and distrusted the use of smell because of its subjective qualities and resistance to linguistic definition. Yet these qualities made smell all the more powerful in sanitary literature, where it was used to generate a powerful emotional effect on readers. Histories of smell need to attend not just to deodorization but re-odorization; the disjuncture between practices of smelling and their textual or visual representation; and chronologies that track the shelving and re-deploying of ways of sensing in different times, places, and communities rather than tracking the de novo emergence of a modern western sensorium. In mid nineteenth-century England smell retained its power, but that power now came from its rhetorical rather than epistemological force.
    • Digitally-social genre fiction: Citizen authors and the changing power dynamics of writing in digital, social spaces.

      Johnson, Miriam J.; University of Derby; College of Arts, Humanities and Education, University of Derby, Derby, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2018-08-09)
      The growth of digitally social media has given rise to the citizen author, as an author who actively chooses to forgo the traditional publishing model and seeks instead to share their works among communities on social platforms. Taking into account the nature of the medium on which they write, they use genre fiction as a means to push the boundaries of what is expected of a ‘book’ or narrative structure. This article shows that, by pushing back against the structure of the author-agent-publisher model, these authors engender communities around their writing and develop relationships directly with readers. These digital villages proliferate around genre writing in online spaces, creating a shifting power dynamic between the publishing industry and the writers who choose to work in these digital spaces, blurring the differential between ‘high’ and ‘low’ art and addressing the issues of gender in genre fiction.
    • Bruno Schulz.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Boiler House Press, 2018-07)
      A creative non-fiction memoir of a lost friend who introduced me to Bruno Schulz. This is a chapter in a pro-EU anthology which was published on the anniversary of Brexit in response to surges of violent British nationalism and political paranoia. Edited by JT Welsch and Ágnes Lehóczky the anthology marks the vital contribution of non-UK-born writers to the UK's poetry culture. Wretched Strangers brings together innovative writing from around the globe, celebrating the irreducible diversity such work brings to ‘British’ poetry. While documenting the challenges faced by writers from elsewhere, these pieces offer hopeful re-conceptions of ‘shared foreignness’ as Lila Matsumoto describes it, and the ‘peculiar state of exiled human,’ in Fawzi Karim’s words.
    • Pauper inventories, social relations, and the nature of poor relief under the old poor law, England, c. 1601–1834.

      Harley, Joseph; University of Derby (Cambridge University Press, 2018-06-13)
      ABSTRACT During the old poor law, many paupers had their possessions inventoried and later taken by authorities as part of the process of obtaining poor relief. Historians have known about this for decades, yet little research has been conducted to establish how widespread the system was, what types of parishioners had their belongings inventoried and why, what the legal status of the practice was, and how it affected social relations in the parish. Using nearly 450 pauper inventories, this article examines these historiographical lacunae. It is argued that the policy had no legal basis and came from local practices and policies. The system is found to be more common in the south and east of England than in the north, and it is argued that the practice gradually became less common from the late eighteenth century. The inventorying of paupers’ goods often formed one of the many creative ways in which parishes helped the poor before 1770, as it guaranteed many paupers assistance until death. However, by the late eighteenth century the appraising of paupers’ goods was closely tied to a negative shift in the attitudes of larger ratepayers and officials, who increasingly wanted to dissuade people from applying for assistance and reduce expenditure.
    • Like a ghost out of nowhere.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Spirit Duplicator, 2018-06)
      This chapter questions disciplinary voices and explores how researchers have worked with power differentials. The whole book features researchers working across art, architecture, ethnography and creative writing discussing how multiple voices are activated and hosted in their work. Edited by Jon Orlek and designed by Jon Cannon, each copy is unique and contains a performance by Vulpes Vulpes.
    • 'But now we float': Cowper, air-balloons, and the poetics of flight

      Lafford, Erin; University of Oxford (The Cowper and Newton Museum, 2018-06)
    • The narrative nightclub.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (2018-05-04)
      This chapter brings together expertise in film and cultural studies to analyse representations of nightclub dancefloors in British films from the 1990s onwards: Human Traffic (Justin Kerrigan, 1999), Sorted (Alexander Jovy, 2000), Soul Boy (Shimmy Marcus, 2010), Everywhere and Nowhere (Menhaj Huda, 2011) and Northern Soul (Elaine Constantine, 2014). We use these films to identify persistent visual iconographies and accompanying ideological underpinnings within the British dancefloor film. To understand what these lms do not do, we also look by way of contrast to a film from France, Eden (Mia Hansen-Løve, 2014). Our approach links academic writing on dance music and nightclub cultures with analysis of filmic texts, and in doing so the chapter captures a sense of the wider discourse surrounding nightclubs and especially the dancefloors that often form their focus, on- and off-screen.
    • Telephone-supported computerised cognitive–behavioural therapy: REEACT-2 large-scale pragmatic randomised controlled trial.

      Gilbody, Simon; Brabyn, Sally; Lovell, Karina; Kessler, David; Devlin, Thomas; Smith, Lucy; Araya, Ricardo; Barkham, Michael; Bower, Peter; Cooper, Cindy; Knowles, Sarah; Littlewood, Elizabeth; Richards, David A.; Tallon, Debbie; White, David; Worthy, Gillian; University of York; University of Manchester; University of Bristol; London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; University of Sheffield; University of Exeter (Cambridge University Press, 2018-01-02)
      Background Computerised cognitive–behavioural therapy (cCBT) for depression has the potential to be efficient therapy but engagement is poor in primary care trials. Aims We tested the benefits of adding telephone support to cCBT. Method We compared telephone-facilitated cCBT (MoodGYM) ( n = 187) to minimally supported cCBT (MoodGYM) ( n = 182) in a pragmatic randomised trial (trial registration: ISRCTN55310481). Outcomes were depression severity (Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire (GAD)-7) and somatoform complaints (PHQ-15) at 4 and 12 months. Results Use of cCBT increased by a factor of between 1.5 and 2 with telephone facilitation. At 4 months PHQ-9 scores were 1.9 points lower (95% CI 0.5–3.3) for telephone-supported cCBT. At 12 months, the results were no longer statistically significant (0.9 PHQ-9 points, 95% CI –0.5 to 2.3). There was improvement in anxiety scores and for somatic complaints. Conclusions Telephone facilitation of cCBT improves engagement and expedites depression improvement. The effect was small to moderate and comparable with other low-intensity psychological interventions.
    • The British Espernatist 10.

      Bareham, Paul; Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Spirit Duplicator, 2018)
    • The journal of imaginary research. Volume 3.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; Guccione, Kay; University of Derby (NATCECT, 2018)
    • On going out and the experience of students.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018)
      Proposes a model for undergraduate culture in the night-time economy, mapping three stages from an HEI-centric culture into a heterogeneous culture and finally a homogenous culture, as youth culture and the night-time economy develop through the twentieth century.
    • Criminal Lives 1780-1925: Punishing Old Bailey Convicts

      Larissa Allwork; Robert Shoemaker; Tim Hitchcock; AHRC Digital Panopticon (London Metropolitan Archives, 2017-12-11)
      Between 1700 and 1900 the British government stopped punishing the bodies of London’s convicts and increasingly sought to exile them and/or reform their minds. From hanging, branding and whipping the response to crime shifted to transportation and imprisonment. By the nineteenth century, judges chose between two contrasting forms of punishments: exile and forced labour in Australia, or incarceration in strictly controlled ‘reformatory’ prisons at home. This exhibition, based on material from London Metropolitan Archives and the AHRC funded Digital Panopticon research project, traces the impact of punishments on individual lives. It follows the men, women and children convicted in London from their crimes and trials through to their experiences of punishment and their subsequent lives.
    • Changing geographies and tourist scholarship.

      Crouch, David; University of Derby; Humanities, University of Derby, Derby, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (Taylor and Francis, 2017-12)
    • bricolage, poetics, spacing

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI), 2017-11-28)
      Contemporary concern for bricolage both transcends and supersedes de Certeau’s important intervention that resituated the term as actions undertaken in everyday life. In particular, he engaged the notion of bricolage in ways that presented tactics, evasions, resistances, ruses and even tricks in his consideration of everyday life as practiced. Whilst these considerations may be read, as indeed he asserted, as ‘making do’, there are further possibilities of this term. For example, bricolage may be considered to ‘occur’. In this we may take the anthropologist Hallam and Ingold’s grasp of creativity as something in our bodily and mental response to situations, calm, anxious and otherwise; responding to the detail of a situation, a required or desired action.
    • Nineteenth-Century letters as a resource: Midlands women as a case study.

      Flint, Alison Claire; University of Derby (Centre for West Midlands History, 2017-11)
      This paper argues that a letter’s physicality is as important to the twenty-first century social historian as the written word. It is not enough to interpret the letter as a literary document nor is it intelligible to take the letter simply as an historical artefact for both lines of enquiry will result in the recounting of one half of the complete whole. A critical evaluation of the archival collection of the Ogston Estate in the heart of the Midlands, indicated that this group of records can deliver more than a concise male orientated genealogical record or history of a Midlands country estate. It has shown that, and most importantly to this study, the majority of the surviving familiar letters from one Midlands family, were written by women, principally the wives, mothers and daughters of the Turbutt/Gladwin family. This offers a unique insight into the personal preoccupations of gentry women in the Midlands, their economic roles and social lives not only from a gentry family focus but also as a vehicle from which to investigate the extent to which the letter and letter writing in the Midlands in the 1800s played a key role in feminine polite society.
    • Lived spaces and planning anarchy: Theory and practice of Colin Ward.

      Crouch, David; University of Derby; Humanities Department, University of Derby, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2017-10-11)