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dc.contributor.authorDimoudi, Argyro
dc.contributor.authorZoras, Stamatis
dc.contributor.authorKantzioura, A.
dc.contributor.authorStogiannou, X.
dc.contributor.authorKosmopoulos, Panagiotis
dc.contributor.authorPallas, C.
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-08T13:21:01Z
dc.date.available2017-02-08T13:21:01Z
dc.date.issued2014-04-23
dc.identifier.citationDimoudi, A. et al (2014) 'Use of cool materials and other bioclimatic interventions in outdoor places in order to mitigate the urban heat island in a medium size city in Greece', Sustainable Cities and Society, 13:89en
dc.identifier.issn22106707
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.scs.2014.04.003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621354
dc.description.abstractThe materials that are used in outdoor spaces are of prime importance as they modulate the air temperature of the lowest layers of the urban canopy layer, they are central to the energy balance of the surface and they form the energy exchanges that affect the comfort conditions of city people. Paved surfaces contribute to sunlight's heating of the air near the surface. Their ability to absorb, store and emit radiant energy has a substantial affect on urban microclimate. The thermal behaviour of typical construction materials in an urban center of North Greece, at Serres, was investigated. The thermal fluctuation during the day and the surface temperature differences between different materials in a selected area inside the urban centre of the city was monitored. The replacement of conventional materials with cool materials was evaluated to have significant benefits. CFD simulations showed that materials replacement, accompanied by other mitigation techniques in the area, result at reduction of the mean surface temperature in the streets of the area of 6.5 °C. The results of the measurements and the CFD simulations are presented in the paper.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S221067071400033Xen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Sustainable Cities and Societyen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectCool materialsen
dc.subjectBioclimatic designen
dc.subjectTemperature measurementen
dc.subjectComputational fluid dynamics (CFD)en
dc.titleUse of cool materials and other bioclimatic interventions in outdoor places in order to mitigate the urban heat island in a medium size city in Greeceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDemocritus University of Thraceen
dc.identifier.journalSustainable Cities and Societyen
html.description.abstractThe materials that are used in outdoor spaces are of prime importance as they modulate the air temperature of the lowest layers of the urban canopy layer, they are central to the energy balance of the surface and they form the energy exchanges that affect the comfort conditions of city people. Paved surfaces contribute to sunlight's heating of the air near the surface. Their ability to absorb, store and emit radiant energy has a substantial affect on urban microclimate. The thermal behaviour of typical construction materials in an urban center of North Greece, at Serres, was investigated. The thermal fluctuation during the day and the surface temperature differences between different materials in a selected area inside the urban centre of the city was monitored. The replacement of conventional materials with cool materials was evaluated to have significant benefits. CFD simulations showed that materials replacement, accompanied by other mitigation techniques in the area, result at reduction of the mean surface temperature in the streets of the area of 6.5 °C. The results of the measurements and the CFD simulations are presented in the paper.


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