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dc.contributor.authorBarnes, Kate M.
dc.contributor.authorGennard, Dorothy E.
dc.contributor.authorDixon, Ron A.
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-13T09:13:35Z
dc.date.available2017-01-13T09:13:35Z
dc.date.issued2010-03-22
dc.identifier.citationBarnes, K. M. et al (2010) 'An assessment of the antibacterial activity in larval excretion/secretion of four species of insects recorded in association with corpses, using Lucilia sericata Meigen as the marker species', Bulletin of Entomological Research, 100 (06):635en
dc.identifier.issn00074853
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S000748530999071X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621246
dc.description.abstractThe relative antibacterial activities of excretion/secretion (ES) from two carrion-feeding insects, Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy and Dermestes maculatus DeGeer, and a detritivore, Tenebrio molitor Linnaeus, were compared to that of Lucilia sericata Meigen, a species with ES of known antibacterial capacity, in order to explore the antimicrobial potential of other carrion and detritivore species. Viable counts were used to assess time-kill of ES against five bacterial species, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis. Antibacterial activity was recorded in all four insect species although T. molitor and D. maculatus were the most effective in controlling growth of P. mirabilis. The blowflies were more effective in controlling a wider range of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The larval ES from all species was shown to reduce bacterial growth rate although differences in antibacterial spectrum were noted and the degree of potency varied between the four species. These differences may be explained ecologically by the different colonisation times of each insect species on the corpse. Overall, this study demonstrates that research into other carrion-feeding insect species has potential to provide an increased source of antimicrobial chemicals to broaden the range of bacterial species beyond that currently controlled using L. sericata.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S000748530999071Xen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Bulletin of Entomological Researchen
dc.subjectCalliphoraen
dc.subjectTenebrioen
dc.subjectDermestesen
dc.subjectAntibacterial activityen
dc.subjectInsectsen
dc.titleAn assessment of the antibacterial activity in larval excretion/secretion of four species of insects recorded in association with corpses, using Lucilia sericata Meigen as the marker speciesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn14752670
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Lincolnen
dc.identifier.journalBulletin of Entomological Researchen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T15:18:59Z
html.description.abstractThe relative antibacterial activities of excretion/secretion (ES) from two carrion-feeding insects, Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy and Dermestes maculatus DeGeer, and a detritivore, Tenebrio molitor Linnaeus, were compared to that of Lucilia sericata Meigen, a species with ES of known antibacterial capacity, in order to explore the antimicrobial potential of other carrion and detritivore species. Viable counts were used to assess time-kill of ES against five bacterial species, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis. Antibacterial activity was recorded in all four insect species although T. molitor and D. maculatus were the most effective in controlling growth of P. mirabilis. The blowflies were more effective in controlling a wider range of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The larval ES from all species was shown to reduce bacterial growth rate although differences in antibacterial spectrum were noted and the degree of potency varied between the four species. These differences may be explained ecologically by the different colonisation times of each insect species on the corpse. Overall, this study demonstrates that research into other carrion-feeding insect species has potential to provide an increased source of antimicrobial chemicals to broaden the range of bacterial species beyond that currently controlled using L. sericata.


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