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dc.contributor.authorSpalek, Basia
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-21T14:15:04Z
dc.date.available2016-12-21T14:15:04Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-29
dc.identifier.citationSpalek, B. (2016) 'Radicalisation, de-radicalisation and counter-radicalisation in relation to families: Key challenges for research, policy and practice' Security Journal, 29 (1):39en
dc.identifier.issn09551662
dc.identifier.doi10.1057/sj.2015.43
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621210
dc.description.abstractThis article explores linkages between research, policy and practice in relation to the role of families in violent and non-violent radicalisation. The article highlights that there are many similarities between the issues highlighted within the research literature and with those highlighted in policy and practice contexts. Both view families as potentially being risky, as well as potentially being a source of protection and rehabilitation. The article also takes a critical gaze towards families, suggesting that this may detract attention away from the wider socio-political factors that also play a significant role in radicalisation. A focus upon families can also inadvertently lead to the creation and perpetuation of a ‘suspect community’. The article suggests that while families can potentially provide a supportive environment for de-radicalisation and counter-radicalisation, safeguards around human rights, information exchange, and child protection must firmly be in place.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/10.1057/sj.2015.43en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Security Journalen
dc.subjectRadicalisationen
dc.subjectCounter-radicalisationen
dc.subjectFamiliesen
dc.subjectSecurityen
dc.subjectTerrorismen
dc.subjectCounter-terrorismen
dc.titleRadicalisation, de-radicalisation and counter-radicalisation in relation to families: Key challenges for research, policy and practiceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn17434645
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalSecurity Journalen
html.description.abstractThis article explores linkages between research, policy and practice in relation to the role of families in violent and non-violent radicalisation. The article highlights that there are many similarities between the issues highlighted within the research literature and with those highlighted in policy and practice contexts. Both view families as potentially being risky, as well as potentially being a source of protection and rehabilitation. The article also takes a critical gaze towards families, suggesting that this may detract attention away from the wider socio-political factors that also play a significant role in radicalisation. A focus upon families can also inadvertently lead to the creation and perpetuation of a ‘suspect community’. The article suggests that while families can potentially provide a supportive environment for de-radicalisation and counter-radicalisation, safeguards around human rights, information exchange, and child protection must firmly be in place.


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