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dc.contributor.authorBarlow, Claire
dc.contributor.authorJolley, Richard P.
dc.contributor.authorHallam, Jenny
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-20T09:14:55Z
dc.date.available2016-12-20T09:14:55Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationBarlow, C. M. and Jolley, R. P. and Hallam, J. L. (2011) 'Drawings as memory aids: optimising the drawing method to facilitate young children’s recall'. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 25 (3). pp. 480-487. DOI: 10.1002/acp.1716en
dc.identifier.issn10990720
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/acp.1716
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621196
dc.description.abstractThere has been supportive evidence of drawing facilitating young children’s event recall. The present study investigated whether additional event details are recalled if the interviewer uses interactive questions in response to information children have spontaneously drawn or verbally reported. Eighty 5- to 6-year-olds were shown a video clip of a novel event and were interviewed the following day. The children were randomly allocated to one of four recall conditions: tell-only, draw-and-tell, interactive draw-and-tell, and interactive tell-only. The children’s verbal reports were transcribed and scored on four different categories of recall: items (objects and people), actions, colours and sayings. The interactive draw-and-tell group recalled more correct information for items compared to the other three recall groups, without any accompanying increase in errors. We propose that drawing increases the opportunity for the interviewer to ask interactive questions, which in turn facilitates children’s accurate recall of item information.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/acp.1716/fullen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectDrawingen
dc.subjectMemoryen
dc.subjectCognitive psychologyen
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.titleDrawings as memory aids: optimising the drawing method to facilitate young children’s recallen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentStaffordshire Universityen
dc.identifier.journalApplied Cognitive Psychologyen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T15:12:36Z
html.description.abstractThere has been supportive evidence of drawing facilitating young children’s event recall. The present study investigated whether additional event details are recalled if the interviewer uses interactive questions in response to information children have spontaneously drawn or verbally reported. Eighty 5- to 6-year-olds were shown a video clip of a novel event and were interviewed the following day. The children were randomly allocated to one of four recall conditions: tell-only, draw-and-tell, interactive draw-and-tell, and interactive tell-only. The children’s verbal reports were transcribed and scored on four different categories of recall: items (objects and people), actions, colours and sayings. The interactive draw-and-tell group recalled more correct information for items compared to the other three recall groups, without any accompanying increase in errors. We propose that drawing increases the opportunity for the interviewer to ask interactive questions, which in turn facilitates children’s accurate recall of item information.


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