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dc.contributor.authorHoward, Chris
dc.contributor.authorHallam, Jenny
dc.contributor.authorBrady, Katie
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-20T09:05:17Z
dc.date.available2016-12-20T09:05:17Z
dc.date.issued2014-09-15
dc.identifier.citationChris Howard, Jenny Hallam & Katie Brady (2016) Governing the souls of young women: exploring the perspectives of mothers on parenting in the age of sexualisation, Journal of Gender Studies, 25:3, 254-268, DOI: 10.1080/09589236.2014.952714en
dc.identifier.issn9589236
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09589236.2014.952714
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621195
dc.description.abstractThe sexualisation of young women has emerged as a growing concern within contemporary western cultures. This has provoked adult anxieties that young women are growing up too fast by adopting inappropriate sexual practices and subjectivies. Psychological discourses have dominated which position sexualisation as a corrupting force that infects the ‘true self’ of young women, so they develop in abnormal ways. This in turn allows psychological practices to govern how to parent against sexualisation within families. To explore this further, six mothers each with daughters aged between eight and twelve years old took part in one to one semi-structured interviews designed to explore how they conceptualised and parented against the early sexualisation of young women. A Foucauldian inspired discourse analysis was employed, which suggested that the mothers talk was situated within a psychological discourse. This enabled sexualisation to be positioned as a corrupting force that disrupted the natural development of young women through deviant bodily practices (e.g. consuming sexualised goods), which prevented them from becoming their ‘true self’. Through the disciplinary gaze of psychology, class inequalities were reproduced where working class families were construed as ‘chavs’ who were bad parents and a site of contagion for sexualisation
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09589236.2014.952714en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Gender Studiesen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectChaven
dc.subjectPsychologyen
dc.subjectPoweren
dc.subjectMothersen
dc.subjectFoucauldian discourse analysisen
dc.subjectSexualisationen
dc.titleGoverning the souls of young women: exploring the perspectives of mothers on parenting in the age of sexualisationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn14653869
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Gender Studiesen
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-07-30
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T15:12:30Z
html.description.abstractThe sexualisation of young women has emerged as a growing concern within contemporary western cultures. This has provoked adult anxieties that young women are growing up too fast by adopting inappropriate sexual practices and subjectivies. Psychological discourses have dominated which position sexualisation as a corrupting force that infects the ‘true self’ of young women, so they develop in abnormal ways. This in turn allows psychological practices to govern how to parent against sexualisation within families. To explore this further, six mothers each with daughters aged between eight and twelve years old took part in one to one semi-structured interviews designed to explore how they conceptualised and parented against the early sexualisation of young women. A Foucauldian inspired discourse analysis was employed, which suggested that the mothers talk was situated within a psychological discourse. This enabled sexualisation to be positioned as a corrupting force that disrupted the natural development of young women through deviant bodily practices (e.g. consuming sexualised goods), which prevented them from becoming their ‘true self’. Through the disciplinary gaze of psychology, class inequalities were reproduced where working class families were construed as ‘chavs’ who were bad parents and a site of contagion for sexualisation


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