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dc.contributor.authorPanáčková, Michaela
dc.contributor.authorBaláš, Jiří
dc.contributor.authorBunc, Václav
dc.contributor.authorGiles, David
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-09T10:13:04Z
dc.date.available2016-12-09T10:13:04Z
dc.date.issued2015-05-08
dc.identifier.citationPanáčková, M. et al (2015) 'Physiological demands of indoor wall climbing in children', Sports Technology, 7 (3-4):183en
dc.identifier.issn1934-6182
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/19346182.2014.968251
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621134
dc.description.abstractThe study aimed to assess the physiological demands of indoor wall climbing in children. Twenty five children (aged 8–12 years) from a climbing school, with a performance RP (red point) of IV to V+ UIAA (Union Internationale des Associations d’Alpinisme) scale, (5.4 to 5.7 YDS, Yosemite Decimal System and 4a to 5a Sport/French scale), participated in the study. All 25 children climbed the first vertical route (IV UIAA, 5.4 YDS, 4a Sport/French) and ten went on to complete the 110° overhanging route (IV+ UIAA, 5.5 YDS, 4b Sport/French). Both routes were climbed in a top rope style, at a self-selected pace. A portable gas analyser was used to assess the physiological response to the climbs. In addition, the time spent climbing by the children was recorded during the subsequent eight-week period. There were no significant differences found in the peak oxygen consumption between boys and girls, or for the route inclinations, with mean values of around 40 ml·kg-1·min-1. The children also achieved similarly high mean % values of HRmax, of between approximately 81 – 90%. To conclude, a typical children’s climbing session involves short intermittent high intensity climbing, interspersed with longer periods of rest. It is possible that climbing in short intermittent bursts, as seen in the present research, may be considered high-intensity-training (HIT), with sufficient intensity to influence aerobic fitness in children.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19346182.2014.968251en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Sports Technologyen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectClimbingen
dc.subjectOxygen Consumptionen
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.subjectEnergy expenditureen
dc.titlePhysiological demands of indoor wall climbing in childrenen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1934-6190
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalSports Technologyen
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-09-18
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T15:10:25Z
html.description.abstractThe study aimed to assess the physiological demands of indoor wall climbing in children. Twenty five children (aged 8–12 years) from a climbing school, with a performance RP (red point) of IV to V+ UIAA (Union Internationale des Associations d’Alpinisme) scale, (5.4 to 5.7 YDS, Yosemite Decimal System and 4a to 5a Sport/French scale), participated in the study. All 25 children climbed the first vertical route (IV UIAA, 5.4 YDS, 4a Sport/French) and ten went on to complete the 110° overhanging route (IV+ UIAA, 5.5 YDS, 4b Sport/French). Both routes were climbed in a top rope style, at a self-selected pace. A portable gas analyser was used to assess the physiological response to the climbs. In addition, the time spent climbing by the children was recorded during the subsequent eight-week period. There were no significant differences found in the peak oxygen consumption between boys and girls, or for the route inclinations, with mean values of around 40 ml·kg-1·min-1. The children also achieved similarly high mean % values of HRmax, of between approximately 81 – 90%. To conclude, a typical children’s climbing session involves short intermittent high intensity climbing, interspersed with longer periods of rest. It is possible that climbing in short intermittent bursts, as seen in the present research, may be considered high-intensity-training (HIT), with sufficient intensity to influence aerobic fitness in children.


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